Visual dyslexia Watch

Franshan2001
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I know this is a stupid question but if you have visual dyslexia do you have an overlay?
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Franshan2001)
I know this is a stupid question but if you have visual dyslexia do you have an overlay?
If you have visual stress it might help but overlays don't work for everybody, they re no help for me
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Franshan2001
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Okay thanks

(Original post by claireestelle)
If you have visual stress it might help but overlays don't work for everybody, they re no help for me
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Tiger Rag
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Sometimes, yes.

(for anyone wondering, visual dyslexia is also known as Irlens Syndrome)
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Kindred
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(Original post by Franshan2001)
I know this is a stupid question but if you have visual dyslexia do you have an overlay?
There are a few things that can help with the visual side of dyslexia and I've tried a few of them so here goes:

Overlays: I had a play around with this when I had just found out about my dyslexia. All I did was put a coloured folder over some reading. I only had a textured one to hand, but even then I noticed a difference.
Different colours can make all the difference. I tried a couple and found that green or pink worked, but that yellow just irritated me more.
Basic concept behind overlays is to reduce pattern glare. Pattern glare is where contrasting colours or brightnesses irritate your eyes and is one of the big causes of visual dyslexic issues. Things like black on white can trigger pattern glare and hurt your eyes. The overlay reduces that contrast and helps your eyes cope.

Glasses: Same concept as overlays, but you don't need to put something on the paper and carry around an overlay. One great thing about it is that it works for computers.
I have some coloured glasses in a dark purple. They do help me, but a lot of the time they annoy me because I couldn't get an anti reflective coating and can see a reflection in them. I've now lost them in a box somewhere after moving house so I'm not using them.
I even found that wearing sunglasses or cheap coloured lenses can help.

Brightness balance: Again, it's all about your eyes getting tired out. Too much contrast or brightness isn't good for eyes and can be an especially big deal with already iffy vision. A well lit room is usually good for work, but too much light can cause strain. I find I need a careful balance between enough light to see and not so much that it glares at me. I also find it helps to match my laptop screen brightness to the room as much as possible.
If you don't have one already I would suggest you consider a dimmable light. It helps me so much being able to carefully control the light of the room.

Eye exercises: Here's where things get interesting. Apparently (according to my optometrist) a big issue with dyslexia is your eyes not being in sync. Basically your eyes each take in a single image and a lot of that is of the same thing. Your brain them lays them over the top of each other to make a whole image. Problem is, they can get layed over just a tiny bit off and that can make things look all messy and tire out your eyes.
This all sounds a little crazy, but he got me to wear old-style 3D glasses with the two colours and made me stare up at the ceiling to show me how it works. Because the two images are meant to mix, the colours should too and you should end up with a mucky brown colour. When they don't mix though you end up with a big block of one and a big block of the other.
Sure enough I had two big blocks, with just a little bit of brown. So after he proved his point he got me to do some exercises to train my eyes.
Things like putting beads at different lengths on a string then looking down at each of them. Following a finger puppet side to side at different distances. Basically stuff that involves shifting focus.
After a good while of that I honestly did notice a difference.

For me employing a mix of those things has really helped. That and being a bit more understanding of myself and not pushing myself too much.
Hope that helps.

Oh and btw your school, college or uni should be able to help you with overlays and stuff.
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Franshan2001
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okay thanks so much
(Original post by Kindred)
There are a few things that can help with the visual side of dyslexia and I've tried a few of them so here goes:

Overlays: I had a play around with this when I had just found out about my dyslexia. All I did was put a coloured folder over some reading. I only had a textured one to hand, but even then I noticed a difference.
Different colours can make all the difference. I tried a couple and found that green or pink worked, but that yellow just irritated me more.
Basic concept behind overlays is to reduce pattern glare. Pattern glare is where contrasting colours or brightnesses irritate your eyes and is one of the big causes of visual dyslexic issues. Things like black on white can trigger pattern glare and hurt your eyes. The overlay reduces that contrast and helps your eyes cope.

Glasses: Same concept as overlays, but you don't need to put something on the paper and carry around an overlay. One great thing about it is that it works for computers.
I have some coloured glasses in a dark purple. They do help me, but a lot of the time they annoy me because I couldn't get an anti reflective coating and can see a reflection in them. I've now lost them in a box somewhere after moving house so I'm not using them.
I even found that wearing sunglasses or cheap coloured lenses can help.

Brightness balance: Again, it's all about your eyes getting tired out. Too much contrast or brightness isn't good for eyes and can be an especially big deal with already iffy vision. A well lit room is usually good for work, but too much light can cause strain. I find I need a careful balance between enough light to see and not so much that it glares at me. I also find it helps to match my laptop screen brightness to the room as much as possible.
If you don't have one already I would suggest you consider a dimmable light. It helps me so much being able to carefully control the light of the room.

Eye exercises: Here's where things get interesting. Apparently (according to my optometrist) a big issue with dyslexia is your eyes not being in sync. Basically your eyes each take in a single image and a lot of that is of the same thing. Your brain them lays them over the top of each other to make a whole image. Problem is, they can get layed over just a tiny bit off and that can make things look all messy and tire out your eyes.
This all sounds a little crazy, but he got me to wear old-style 3D glasses with the two colours and made me stare up at the ceiling to show me how it works. Because the two images are meant to mix, the colours should too and you should end up with a mucky brown colour. When they don't mix though you end up with a big block of one and a big block of the other.
Sure enough I had two big blocks, with just a little bit of brown. So after he proved his point he got me to do some exercises to train my eyes.
Things like putting beads at different lengths on a string then looking down at each of them. Following a finger puppet side to side at different distances. Basically stuff that involves shifting focus.
After a good while of that I honestly did notice a difference.

For me employing a mix of those things has really helped. That and being a bit more understanding of myself and not pushing myself too much.
Hope that helps.

Oh and btw your school, college or uni should be able to help you with overlays and stuff.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by Franshan2001)
I know this is a stupid question but if you have visual dyslexia do you have an overlay?
Is it irlen that you have?
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Headingtonian
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(Original post by Franshan2001)
I know this is a stupid question but if you have visual dyslexia do you have an overlay?
I have Irlen's syndrome and have green lensed glasses which i wear rather than using an overlay because I had to stick different overlays together to get the right colour. I had colorimetry testing by a behavioural optometrist to get the right colour, and use my glasses in conjunction with coloured paper (which works like an overlay but allows you to write on the page) as if my glasses were the perfect shade they would be too dark to use. I find it especially important to use them when reading text which is small or reading on a screen.

I also had eye exercises to do (similar to Kindred's), as I had problems changing the focus of my eyes for example when looking from the board to my book. I can't use a binocular microscope as my eyes don't work together properly, so have it projected on a screen, but this was something that the exercises didn't really improve.
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Elisha.l
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(Original post by Kindred)
There are a few things that can help with the visual side of dyslexia and I've tried a few of them so here goes:

Overlays: I had a play around with this when I had just found out about my dyslexia. All I did was put a coloured folder over some reading. I only had a textured one to hand, but even then I noticed a difference.
Different colours can make all the difference. I tried a couple and found that green or pink worked, but that yellow just irritated me more.
Basic concept behind overlays is to reduce pattern glare. Pattern glare is where contrasting colours or brightnesses irritate your eyes and is one of the big causes of visual dyslexic issues. Things like black on white can trigger pattern glare and hurt your eyes. The overlay reduces that contrast and helps your eyes cope.

Glasses: Same concept as overlays, but you don't need to put something on the paper and carry around an overlay. One great thing about it is that it works for computers.
I have some coloured glasses in a dark purple. They do help me, but a lot of the time they annoy me because I couldn't get an anti reflective coating and can see a reflection in them. I've now lost them in a box somewhere after moving house so I'm not using them.
I even found that wearing sunglasses or cheap coloured lenses can help.

Brightness balance: Again, it's all about your eyes getting tired out. Too much contrast or brightness isn't good for eyes and can be an especially big deal with already iffy vision. A well lit room is usually good for work, but too much light can cause strain. I find I need a careful balance between enough light to see and not so much that it glares at me. I also find it helps to match my laptop screen brightness to the room as much as possible.
If you don't have one already I would suggest you consider a dimmable light. It helps me so much being able to carefully control the light of the room.

Eye exercises: Here's where things get interesting. Apparently (according to my optometrist) a big issue with dyslexia is your eyes not being in sync. Basically your eyes each take in a single image and a lot of that is of the same thing. Your brain them lays them over the top of each other to make a whole image. Problem is, they can get layed over just a tiny bit off and that can make things look all messy and tire out your eyes.
This all sounds a little crazy, but he got me to wear old-style 3D glasses with the two colours and made me stare up at the ceiling to show me how it works. Because the two images are meant to mix, the colours should too and you should end up with a mucky brown colour. When they don't mix though you end up with a big block of one and a big block of the other.
Sure enough I had two big blocks, with just a little bit of brown. So after he proved his point he got me to do some exercises to train my eyes.
Things like putting beads at different lengths on a string then looking down at each of them. Following a finger puppet side to side at different distances. Basically stuff that involves shifting focus.
After a good while of that I honestly did notice a difference.

For me employing a mix of those things has really helped. That and being a bit more understanding of myself and not pushing myself too much.
Hope that helps.

Oh and btw your school, college or uni should be able to help you with overlays and stuff.
I fount the same thing that pink overlays help but the yellow make it worse
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Franshan2001
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Okay thanks
(Original post by Elisha.l)
I fount the same thing that pink overlays help but the yellow make it worse
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chelseadagg3r
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Hi I have Irlen syndrome and have an orange overlay. It doesn't really do anything for me though, so I don't use it because of the faff. They do work for some people, but not for myself personally
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