Jang Gwangnam
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Title.

EDIT: Summary of replies.
- Too much Content
- Too little Time to go over that Content
- Need to Understand that Content as questions worded in a very content-has-to-be-understood way otherwise you don't understand
- Need to have a good Short term memory or less I can keep dreaming about that BBB

Okay, Thanks the information Everybody.
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sulaimanali
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Well, what do you think?

What does cramming mean? What does 'A' level mean?
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Den987
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(Original post by anon157)
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Cramming works for some people. However, not for the majority because whilst you might have a big list with everything you want to revise, you will find that with so much you will have forgotten some of the stuff you have already looked through. That's why you have to go through it as a reasonable pace, so it all sets in.
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S.G.
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Cramming failed for me at AS for biology.

There's too much content
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mbatshuayi
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Cramming (AS) was perfectly fine for me in maths economics and geography. Sacrificed physics cos if it though and got a D 😂
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math42
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It doesn't necessarily, for the right type of person with a sufficient grasp prior to revision of the right module of the right subject. But in general, there's a lot of content and it's very difficult to both retain it and become good at answering questions on it when you have a very short space of time available to you.
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Meu
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It all depends on the persons memory, however for cramming good short term memory is ideal, and long term memory will benefit if you can recall moments from when you were in your classroom.
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Ed5
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(Original post by anon157)
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It's because of the new reformed A Levels - at least in terms of the sciences, the new papers follow a less predictable structure and rely much more on application of knowledge than ability to recite facts.

To give you an idea of the unpredictability, AQA physics paper 3 is about practical skills and we expected it to be based on the 12 assessed practicals we did throughout the course: the actual paper did not refer to a single one.

The questions were also worded to the point where it was difficult to know what they were asking for, and would be impossible to answer without an actual understanding of the topic.

Aside from this, there is also just a lot more content than at GCSE which simply can't be covered in a couple of nights, not to any useful degree.
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Hildi
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There's way too much content at A level (at least from what I've seen) for most people to do this successfully. It also teaches you nothing about essay or exam technique
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confusedlikeme
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YES, this isn't GCSE, you'll fail if you cram the night before the exam. A-levels are now linear, if you don't keep up with the work it will bite you in the ass. Some people have managed to get good grades by cramming however that was the old spec.
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maroumarou
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I didn't really set out intending to cram, but it worked fine for me at A Level. I jsut struggled to motivate myself until the exams begun. My exams were also really spread out- mostly had 1/2 days between each exam- so was able to do loads of memorising
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IrrationalRoot
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It doesn't necessarily fail, it's perfectly possible for someone to cram and still get 95+% in all their exams. Contrary to what many others say it's not a case of 'cramming works at GCSE but not at A Level'. You need to use the right revision method. That is, not wasting any time - reading a good set of notes (from a good textbook for example) thoroughly and then doing all of the papers. Then it just comes down to how good your memory is.
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Kiimii
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because for a lot of subjects you need to understand the content, not just memorise it
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2025
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(Original post by anon157)
Title.
I did the new spec for my A levels and got BCC in Psychology, Law, and Sociology respectively revising the day before, an hour before and for one subject even 2 minutes before the exam (it was sociology which was easy though tbh but to boring to revise). I was also out of college for 4 months and didn't do any work but knuckled down with cramming at the latest possible moment-i wouldn't advise this at all though as it's very stressful and your better trying for higher grades.
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bones-mccoy
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A lot of A Levels are content heavy so there's just too much to remember. I also took subjects that were similar so didn't have a lot of time between exams to revise properly - I once had 2 A2 Maths exams on the same afternoon.
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Kira Yagami
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A level requires a lot of UNDERSTANDING, especially for tougher subjects like Maths and Chemistry. Cramming a few days before might get you a C or something at most (for most people). With GCSE's it's just memorising with learning a bit of technique.
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