WhichDegree?
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So basically i can either choose to do an electrical and electronic engineering degree.
Or a Computer science degree.

Which one should i do?
What would be better in terms of career (salary in the future after graduating)?
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uberteknik
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(Original post by WhichDegree?)
So basically i can either choose to do an electrical and electronic engineering degree.
Or a Computer science degree.

Which one should i do?
What would be better in terms of career (salary in the future after graduating)?
To do well at university, you need to have a passion for the subject you are studying. EE Engineering and CS have overlaps but are very different in overall content. So you need to have a focus on the career you would eventually like to pursue.

Speaking as an engineer, if you are thinking of doing engineering as simply a means to earn a high salary, you are setting yourself up for misery.

Electrical and Electronic Engineering is not for the faint hearted. It is both work heavy and intensive and you had better love what you study and love your job/career or it will be a nightmare. For example, my degree started with 100+ students in the first year. Sixteen people graduated with honours.

The maths content of the engineering course will inevitably outstrip that of the computer science course (I'd say by a fair margin) and is heavily biased towards real-world applications.

Of which a major part throughout the course will be projects culminating in a major project for your honours part which requires problem definition, analysis, design, construction, testing, writing your dissertation and a final presentation of your work with critique by an exam panel.

Programming and coding will inevitably form a large part of that project if you choose to base it around say a microcontroller application.

You will also be exposed to things like behavioural science, project management, finance, corporate structures, presentation delivery, production engineering as well as the full range of technologies, standards, legislation etc.

Computer Science is much more abstract.

As far as careers are concerned, both are in demand. How much you earn depends on your aptitude and performance in your job. Salary is dependent on how good you are at doing your job, your flair, personality, man-management skills etc. and not on how well you did in your exams.
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Azeem Shah
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^Spot on mate. Like he said, don't favor one over the other only in terms of salary because you'll have a miserable life ahead of you. Choose whatever you're passionate about and I'm sure success will follow
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WhichDegree?
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(Original post by uberteknik)
To do well at university, you need to have a passion for the subject you are studying. EE Engineering and CS have overlaps but are very different in overall content. So you need to have a focus on the career you would eventually like to pursue.

Speaking as an engineer, if you are thinking of doing engineering as simply a means to earn a high salary, you are setting yourself up for misery.

Electrical and Electronic Engineering is not for the faint hearted. It is both work heavy and intensive and you had better love what you study and love your job/career or it will be a nightmare. For example, my degree started with 100+ students in the first year. Sixteen people graduated with honours.

The maths content of the engineering course will inevitably outstrip that of the computer science course (I'd say by a fair margin) and is heavily biased towards real-world applications.

Of which a major part throughout the course will be projects culminating in a major project for your honours part which requires problem definition, analysis, design, construction, testing, writing your dissertation and a final presentation of your work with critique by an exam panel.

Programming and coding will inevitably form a large part of that project if you choose to base it around say a microcontroller application.

You will also be exposed to things like behavioural science, project management, finance, corporate structures, presentation delivery, production engineering as well as the full range of technologies, standards, legislation etc.

Computer Science is much more abstract.

As far as careers are concerned, both are in demand. How much you earn depends on your aptitude and performance in your job. Salary is dependent on how good you are at doing your job, your flair, personality, man-management skills etc. and not on how well you did in your exams.

Thanks for the advice.

I can see that your a Principal Aerospace Systems Design Engineer
Can i ask how many years of experience you had from the time of completing your masters degree till you got that job?
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uberteknik
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(Original post by WhichDegree?)
Thanks for the advice.

I can see that your a Principal Aerospace Systems Design Engineer
Can i ask how many years of experience you had from the time of completing your masters degree till you got that job?
That's not as straightforward to answer. My masters was a company sponsored course on full pay for the taught part (six months residential full time six days a week intensive). Then a further eighteen months on-the-job development project culminating in submission of a thesis which in practice turned out to be part dissertation.

From completing my degree and promotion from engineer, then senior engineer to principal took around ten years. (Five job grade increments).

It all depends on ability, performance and opportunity o determine how fast someone progresses. Most don't make it past senior. (I'm now senior principal btw.)

The next promotion carries the title Technology Expert and is considered an executive level grade on par with senior managers. (Hays management grade M5/M4)
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