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    A recent report from the University Partnership Programme (UPP) has shown that first year uni students and applicants would feel disappointed if significantly fewer EU and international students were at their universities...

    "As 2 in 5 first year students/applicants feel that meeting a variety of different people is an important part of their student experience, missing out on the chance to meet people from different countries will certainly impact this. Almost half of first year students/applicants would feel disappointed if there were to be fewer EU students at their university."
    Do you think it's important to have a diverse mix of students at university? :hmmmm:

    Would you be disappointed if there were fewer international students at your university? :sad:

    Also, if you're a UK student who has a strong opinion on why diversity is important at uni, send me a PM and I can put you in touch with a journalist writing about this topic
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    I think it's always good to have a mix of all sorts of people, international students included; so long as they aren't prioritised over national students and vice versa. It's enriching to get to know people who are different from you in various ways. It would be pretty dull if everyone at university was British.
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    I don't think a lack of diversity, in any sense, is a problem at all provided that there's no unjust barriers within the application processes.
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    I prefer diversity in all areas, because I enjoy having the opportunity to meet people and I think others should have the same opportunities regardless of background.

    Homogeneity is boring as ****.
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    (Original post by discobish)
    A recent report from the University Partnership Programme (UPP) has shown that first year uni students and applicants would feel disappointed if significantly fewer EU and international students were at their universities...



    Do you think it's important to have a diverse mix of students at university? :hmmmm:

    Would you be disappointed if there were fewer international students at your university? :sad:

    Also, if you're a UK student who has a strong opinion on why diversity is important at uni, send me a PM and I can put you in touch with a journalist writing about this topic
    for me its more about racial diversity tbh, i dont really care if there will or wont be international students but those are just my thoughts don't know how others would feel though
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    I'd prefer that students at University come from many, many different Nationalities, Ethnicities, Religions, Culture and Races, but I would want the vast majority of those people to also be British Citizens. It prioritises our own labour force, unemployment rate, taxes, educational system, skill capacity, households, and pretty much our own economy. Its not like we need international students to take places in our elite universities on high-demand courses, we could easily fill up 3x the number of availble places on courses with capable, appropriate students from among the wide variety of choices of our own citizens. Why give an elite, high-demand degree to someone from China, India or Russia who'll just go back to their country after utilising our resources for a few years? Why prioritise someone who hasn't helped to build the country or is a part of it in some way or another? I personally think we accept way too many international students. Besides, if we did, other countries would be pressured to build their own elite universities. For example, India has 1,300,000,00 people, with "armies" amazing students. However, its top university, The University of Delhi, ranks anywhere from 601th-800th according to the gaurdian. Thats crazy. We really do need to encourage educational growth in other countries, but more importantly, our own.
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    (Original post by HabibSyed)
    I'd prefer that students at University come from many, many different Nationalities, Ethnicities, Religions, Culture and Races, but I would want the vast majority of those people to also be British Citizens. It prioritises our own labour force, unemployment rate, taxes, educational system, skill capacity, households, and pretty much our own economy. Its not like we need international students to take places in our elite universities on high-demand courses, we could easily fill up 3x the number of availble places on courses with capable, appropriate students from among the wide variety of choices of our own citizens. Why give an elite, high-demand degree to someone from China, India or Russia who'll just go back to their country after utilising our resources for a few years? Why prioritise someone who hasn't helped to build the country or is a part of it in some way or another? I personally think we accept way too many international students. Besides, if we did, other countries would be pressured to build their own elite universities. For example, India has 1,300,000,00 people, with "armies" amazing students. However, its top university, The University of Delhi, ranks anywhere from 601th-800th according to the gaurdian. Thats crazy. We really do need to encourage educational growth in other countries, but more importantly, our own.
    Someone's place of birth shouldn't affect their chances of studying at any establishment.
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    "As 2 in 5 first year students/applicants feel that meeting a variety of different people is an important part of their student experience, "

    Considering a huge proportion of university students are international students, I wonder how many people said yes but were international.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Someone's place of birth shouldn't affect their chances of studying at any establishment.
    No, not at all!

    Where they are citizens how ever should have an affect however, I was born in Canada, but am a British Citizen by desent. I'm a dual-national but still a British Citizen. Many people were born in other countries and have British citizenship, I never said thay had to be born in Britain. They should be British citizens however. They can originaly come from Pakistan, Russia, China, Japan, Nigeria, Mexico, India or any other country, but if they are citizens, they have the right to an equal opportunity just like someone who's been born in a British bloodline since the beggining of time. Espeacially since, there is no such thing as second class citizens.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Someone's place of birth shouldn't affect their chances of studying at any establishment.
    Yes, it absolutely should.
    Any self respecting country should be prioritizing its own children ahead of other countries. As another user here correctly said, they will simply bring their knowledge back to their own country and contribute little here. Alternatively, they stay here and have deprived a native kid of going to a prestigious school. In the same way it would be unfair if a British kid was accepted into a Ugandan university ahead of a similarly able native Ugandan, the same applies here. The only reason that is not so is because Uganda is not famed for its universities, but the UK most definitely is. So there is a lot of competition here, and therefore people will complain and whine more when there's not enough "diversity". As they do with every aspect of the UK, because we are a successful country.
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    (Original post by HabibSyed)
    No, not at all!

    Where they are citizens how ever should have an affect however, I was born in Canada, but am a British Citizen by desent. I'm a dual-national but still a British Citizen. Many people were born in other countries and have British citizenship, I never said thay had to be born in Britain. They should be British citizens however. They can originaly come from Pakistan, Russia, China, Japan, Nigeria, Mexico, India or any other country, but if they are citizens, they have the right to an equal opportunity just like someone who's been born in a British bloodline since the beggining of time. Espeacially since, there is no such thing as second class citizens.
    (Original post by davyjones123)
    Yes, it absolutely should.
    Any self respecting country should be prioritizing its own children ahead of other countries. As another user here correctly said, they will simply bring their knowledge back to their own country and contribute little here. Alternatively, they stay here and have deprived a native kid of going to a prestigious school. In the same way it would be unfair if a British kid was accepted into a Ugandan university ahead of a similarly able native Ugandan, the same applies here. The only reason that is not so is because Uganda is not famed for its universities, but the UK most definitely is. So there is a lot of competition here, and therefore people will complain and whine more when there's not enough "diversity". As they do with every aspect of the UK, because we are a successful country.
    I'll reply to these together because they're the same argument.

    It's not a special thing to be British. It takes no skill or talent. It should not affect your life in any big way.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I'll reply to these together because they're the same argument.

    It's not a special thing to be British. It takes no skill or talent. It should not affect your life in any big way.

    If you cannot see how prioritizing your own people over outsiders is a good thing, then I really cannot help you. It is literally a biological imperative, which many of us today in the UK are fighting against sadly.
    Having no ties to your country or own people isn't an edgy or cool thing, it's actually rather sad.
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    "Diversity at uni" particularly from internationals means fulfilling quotas for economic reasons, getting money from them no matter how clever or stupid they might be. Money and funding is great of course but not if that's the main goal because I'd rather not attend a university that's bought out yet full of ignoramuses; no one can presume every international student is intelligent or ambitious. Some really are there simply because they can afford it. I'm not asking for geniuses but I'd like to attend knowing that any random student sitting next to me is bright and earned their way there and can speak English (as this is an English speaking country).

    But in reality I don't really pay attention to other student's capabilities anyway and I'm sure many students (although probably not every) look forward to meeting people at least slightly different than them because that makes stressful uni seem more fun and worthwhile. That doesn't necessarily mean different race or religion though; a Catholic German attending uni in France will find himself/herself around many other Catholic white people, but they can still enjoy a different atmosphere that makes uni exciting. A black Jamaican attending uni in London will definitely see many other black people. A white student from this part of the city or country attending uni in another part, etc. So diversity isn't just racial or religious.

    Would I like to see diversity because there's more black citizen students? Well, that's not something you can ask someone whether they want to see it more or not. I'd think that more black students at uni is primarily up to black students and how they perform at school beforehand.

    I'd definitely like to see more male students
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I'll reply to these together because they're the same argument.

    It's not a special thing to be British. It takes no skill or talent. It should not affect your life in any big way.
    It has nothing to do with a British citizen having skills for being British, its about how it will affect our own economic and educational growth as a country 😂😂😂. Out of curiosity, are you a British citizen?
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    (Original post by davyjones123)
    If you cannot see how prioritizing your own people over outsiders is a good thing, then I really cannot help you. It is literally a biological imperative, which many of us today in the UK are fighting against sadly.
    Having no ties to your country or own people isn't an edgy or cool thing, it's actually rather sad.
    My people are other human beings, I couldn't give a flying **** where they're from.
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    (Original post by HabibSyed)
    It has nothing to do with a British citizen having skills for being British, its about how it will affect our own economic and educational growth as a country 😂😂😂. Out of curiosity, are you a British citizen?
    Why is my nationality relevant?
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    I absolutely refuse to apply to a Uni where more than 85% of people are white.

    It just shows that they don't care about social progress.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Why is my nationality relevant?
    So thats the one question you choose to answer?

    Its relevant because a person who isn't a British citizen shouldn't be trying to rebel against a British university system. Its the same reason we don't allow Non-British Citizens to take part in our general elections...? Unless the decision will affect your life significantly, like the British army invading your country which will have a detrimental affect on your economy and lifestyle, or British environmental impacts are having a negative impact which affect your land, you're opinion isn't relevant and doesn't really belong. Your opinion would only hold its own if you at least had international reputation for knowledge on this subject, which I'm sure you don't. If you're not a British Citizen, your opinion holds zero value on this topic.
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    (Original post by HabibSyed)
    So thats the one question you choose to answer?

    Its relevant because a person who isn't a British citizen shouldn't be trying to rebel against a British university system. Its the same reason we don't allow Non-British Citizens to take part in our general elections...? Unless the decision will affect your life significantly, like the British army invading your country which will have a detrimental affect on your economy and lifestyle, or British environmental impacts are having a negative impact which affect your land, you're opinion isn't relevant and doesn't really belong. Your opinion would only hold its own if you at least had international reputation for knowledge on this subject, which I'm sure you don't. If you're not a British Citizen, your opinion holds zero value on this topic.
    So only British people are allowed to be involved in a debate? It's not a vote, it's a discussion on the topic, there's no reason to exclude non British citizens from the debate.

    And yes, I am. My dads family aren't British by birth but I was born here, and have citizenship.
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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    I absolutely refuse to apply to a Uni where more than 85% of people are white.

    It just shows that they don't care about social progress.
    85% white right? Ya, I agree. Because the top 85% of students are definately not all white. I would want say at least 85% of people to be British citizens, anything from white, brown, black, to purple, whatever really. It has nothing to do with promoting one type of person over another, its simply looking out for all of our economy.
 
 
 
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