04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Welcome to the Education and childhood studies forum!
:party:

Please scan through the relevant information in this thread to make sure that you're posting in the right forum.

This forum is about the Study of Education: Learning about learning.:yep:

Myth-Buster No.1 - THIS IS NOT TEACHER TRAINING!:fuhrer:
There is a separate forum for such enquiries.

The following are the more common discussion points included within this sub-forum:

Education Studies
Primary Education
Early Childhood Studies
Postgraduate Courses
About Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Personal Statements


PS. A bit about me.
Last edited by 04MR17; 2 years ago
3
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#2
Education Studies
Have you ever wondered how education shapes society, and how society shapes education? Have you ever reflected upon the political nature of decisions made about, and within, educational institutions? Have you ever considered whether education systems are fair, and if everyone has the same opportunities of access, and of success? If any of those questions made you think, then the Education Studies programme may be for you.

Studying education means considering its relationship to the economy, its historical evolution, its impact on people’s life chances and identities, how education is organised, and how learners learn. When studying the subject you will be exploring the ways in which the world of education is changing and looking at education from philosophical, historical, psychological, cultural and sociological perspectives. This course examines changing ideas about childhood, learning, schooling and education, and factors such as poverty, social policies and digital technologies which impact on these.

The schools of Education within universities have three main types of students:
- Students training to be teachers. See the teacher training sub-forum.

- Professionals in Education wanting to develop their career usually through postgraduate courses.

- Students interested in education policy and reform. This is what undergraduate education is all about.

The conceptual study of education as an object of fascination, as a point of interest. An interest in trying to identify the things that underpin education: like its purpose: what is education for?

As such, issues such as equity, teacher quality, and education assessment have become focuses of many schools of education. Education and inclusion is another strong theme.

This subject, at about 30 years old, is very very new, hence such a low number of students nationally doing the subject. The subject is slowly growing in popularity. FUN FACT: at the University of Cambridge, the most popular modules for electives are in Education*.

The subject is mostly essay-based, very much like humanities or other social science courses, which means it's a popular subject in dual honours. Most common paired subjects include:

- Psychology
- History
- Sociology
- Philosophy
- English

Plenty of universities offer Education combined with more subjects too. From Maths to Geography to Theology and Religion.

PLEASE NOTE: If your career goal is to become a secondary school teacher, then at least 50% of your degree ought to be in the subject you wish to teach. So if you're interested in this subject and intend on becoming a secondary school teacher, then please considering taking a dual honours course.

If you have an interest in any of the above, then this is the right place for you. Feel free to post any questions in the forum. Also, if you're applying to do this course or a similar one for 2018 entry, then check out the applicants thread.


Spoiler:
Show

*source = they told me that when I went
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
Primary Education

It’s not just what children learn, but the context in which they learn, which affect their life experiences. Many other factors can also impact on education outcomes. Primary Education, like the more general Education courses, explores all these ideas, and is intended to prepare students for a teaching career, or a range of careers relating to education.

A Primary Education Studies course is the first step towards possibly becoming a primary school teacher. This is not the only route into the profession, many primary teachers will have a traditional degree in a subject of their choice and choose to do a PGCE or other postgraduate qualification to gain QTS. For more information about how to become a primary school teacher, please see the relevant sub-forum in Careers and Jobs.

With a balance of theory and reflection on current practice, Primary Education students should gain a thorough understanding of education history, policy and current professional practice in the primary school classroom in areas such as developing children’s mathematical and literacy skills, the wider curriculum subjects, lesson planning, and classroom management.

The course is designed for those looking for a career working with or for children of primary school age and/or their families. The key focus is on children of primary school age and includes educational, health, welfare, psychological, sociological, legal, philosophical, political and economic perspectives.

A lot of Primary Education courses (some do not) are now accredited with QTS. See this post for further information about QTS. The difference to remember is that when QTS is involved, such as in a PGCE, the focus is very much on training. When QTS is not included, this often means that the degree is more conceptual and less practical in nature. Usually a course in Primary Education with QTS will last 4 years instead of 3.

If you have an interest in any of the above, then this is the right place for you. Feel free to post any questions in the forum. Also, if you're applying to do this course or a similar one for 2018 entry, then check out the applicants thread.

clarkey500I believe the majority of universities require 10 days work experience in schools, but more than that shows that you are willing. Obviously, do check the requirements for the universities you are applying for though. I did around 23 I think, the year before, split up around the year. However, if you are at college, I would recommend going into a school once your academic year has finished as it usually a few weeks earlier and therefore it won't interrupt your studies. You will have to organise this a few weeks in advance, so the school are prepared and you can get a DBS check.
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#4
Primary Education Interview Advice

Words from Ella, second year at Reading...

As an applicant and prospective student, an interview date is often a chance to familiarise yourself with the university that you have applied for and to get to know the course a little better (as well as a method of filtering out some candidates). It also allows the university admissions tutors to assess if you would be a good fit on the course and to put a name to a personal statement. They want to see if you are eager and enthusiastic about the field that you are being interviewed for and it is your chance to display this.

Top Tips:
  • Make sure you are prepared as much you can be for the actual day to avoid unnecessary stress (something that you definitely don’t want before your interview even starts).
  • Give yourself plenty of time to reach the education provider as this can sometimes be difficult to locate (particularly if you are unsure about where you are going/it is your first time attending the site).
  • Check if there are any tasks you need to complete beforehand, complete them to the best of your ability and then reread them the day before to familiarise yourself. This will mean that you aren’t rushing the night before. If you're not sure what tasks you've been given check any emails you've been sent. If any of these are unclear check the university webpages and/or email the department for clarification. (Clarification does not mean advice on how to go about your tasks, this would be unfair to other candidates and a waste of your time asking.)
  • Try to research a little bit more about the course and what it entails as this will help you to ask relevant questions to the admissions tutors on the day, helping you to see if the course that you are being interviewed for is the right one for you and allow you feel more comfortable. You don't need to ask a question, it's not an expectation and won't make you look massively impressive by having a question - it may look worse if you ask a very basic question that you could easily find online.


Ensure that you have familiarised yourself with what is required of you for your course in terms of entry requirements and experience.
  • This should involve the passing of the QTS skills tests in English and mathematics. It is wise to book these ASAP if you are interested in the course, as slots can fill up very quickly and education providers will generally require these of you prior to starting the course. You can complete mock tests online for this.
  • You will also likely require a DBS check before the course begins - information regarding this are likely to be mentioned at interview.
  • Some universities will require evidence of work experience in a school or education setting also, so it is important to check this beforehand.


Good luck!
Last edited by 04MR17; 1 year ago
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
Early Childhood Studies

A course looking into child development theory and it’s implication in childcare. You will learn about some key developmental milestones, how they impact a child’s life and how people and settings can help a child to reach them. This will involve looking at some theories and how they see childhood along with becoming familiar with current guidelines and practice.

You will also look at some studies and case studies. A key part of childcare is protecting children from potential harm so there will also be some focus on child rights and abuse. The course will also involve placement where you go into a childcare setting and learn from the people there.

After an ECS course you are qualified for various forms of childcare and childcare related jobs such as nursery work. You can also go on to complete other qualifications like a PGCE, EYTS or other teaching training which will qualify you for Early Years teaching. See this sub-forum for more on teacher training.

Things that look great on an application for ECS include: work experience or volunteering with children (such as Beavers or Rainbows), a knowledge of sign or Makaton, a first aid qualification, any sort of experience working in a team and thinking on your feet (like a sport), an obvious passion for childcare. If you have more queries on applications feel free to post in the Applicants Thread.

If you have an interest in any of the above, then this is the right place for you. Feel free to post any questions in the forum.

For more question on Early Childhood Studies, 1secondsofvamps knows what's up. So tag her in any of your queries.

Spoiler:
Show

Thanks to Kindred for providing this information.

1
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#6
Postgraduate courses

Although this sub-forum is specifically for Undergraduate courses. It is worth including here possible progression options from a degree in an Education-related field.

MA Education Studies - This is popular among teachers who which to progress into school leadership. Hence an MA in Education can often be very mainstream focused, issues around contemporary education, modern schools and learning strategies. Some universities do however offer a broader focus, with a lot of these specialising in research of new topics. Since the subject is so knew, there are lots of new avenues of interest to explore and research, which an MA can be a good opportunity for.

Masters courses in Primary Ed and ECS are also widely available, though less common than Education Studies.

PGCE - Most people are familiar with the Post-Graduate Certificate in Education. This is essentially a one-year teacher-training course designed to equip graduates with the skills to teach. This is the most common form of gaining Qualified Teacher Status and is a very popular course at lots of universities, normally facilitated through the Education department, with the same tutors as Education Studies. The different lies between study and training, which this is very much the latter. So if you're looking to continue with the conceptual elements of a BA in an Education-related subject, then the MA above might be the better option for you.

For all post-graduate courses in this area please post in the relevant forum.

For more general Post-Graduate questions, see the post-grad forum.
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#7
About Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)

Qualified Teacher Statues is what you need to be able to teach legally.

There are a number of ways to achieve this. Most do it through a PGCE (see post above). Others choose to do a School Centred Initial Teacher Training course (SCITT) or Schools Direct or there are other smaller programmes available through which to become a teacher after your degree (mostly famously teach first).

There are also some undergraduate courses which come accredited with QTS upon graduation. These courses normally take 4 years, and are more common when studying Primary Education than Education Studies (though both are still quite common).

The important distinction to make between a course with QTS and one without, is that a QTS course will be more training focused. There will be less of the studying of conceptual ideas around education (as discussed in posts 2 and 3) and more content in relation to future practice.

In order to achieve QTS there are some Professional Skills Tests which you must pass. Further information on these can be found in this thread.
0
reply
alleycat393
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
04MR17 I just wanted to say that this thread is beautiful :heart::love:

FYI She-Ra

Ps:- and the forum is nice and tidy
0
reply
KanyesVest
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 years ago
#9
I just this morning submitted my ucas application to study Education 🎉
1
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#10
Here are some Personal Statements from TSR's Personal Statement Collection.
Full collection can be found here. There are some on that list for different courses though, all the relevant ones have been copied into this list.
I've added my own (personal and subjective) comments below each of them, based on my very critical opinion.

Education/Teaching:


Personal Statement 1

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments

Solid stuff. Lots of good things raised.

Unfortunately, most of it is not linked to studying the degree for 3 years though.


Personal Statement 2

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

Another packed PS with lots of juicy stuff.

Mostly, once again, unrelated to the course they wish to study. Making links direct and explicit is what's needed here I feel.


Personal Statement 3

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

This one particularly needs to be focused about the course, a harsh admissions tutor could see this:

"Throughout my schooling I have also received high marks for effort"

And wonder why on earth that is relevant to an Education/Teaching course at university.

There is no doubting the ambition and positive attitude of this applicant, but PSs should be directed very closely to the course being applied to.


Personal Statement 4

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

Much like the others, little reference to the course studying, good solid achievements covered though, which will have served them well. The courses which are tougher to get into (especially) would prefer as much as possible for the PS to be focused on the subject.:yes:


Personal Statement 4

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

Much like the others, little reference to the course studying, good solid achievements covered though.


Personal Statement 5

Spoiler:
Show

First half reads too much like a narrative I feel: describing your teacher's hair is probably a waste of characters.

The last bit is much much better though, but it took them a long time to get round to talking about the present, rather than their life story. Although this shouldn't be the case, an admissions tutor with a lot of these to read may get weary of life stories.




Education Joint Honours:


Education and English Literature

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

Very confident and assured personal statement, mostly focused on the course of study which is excellent.:yep:

Words like "verisimilitude" and "symbiotic" aren't really necessary and stand out a little bit here: make sure it looks natural when using fancy terms.

"though English Literature and Education are divided areas of academic study" is a bit risky to say on a Joint Honours PS in my view.:sadnod: And they contradict that statement later.

This seems to be a PS aiming for Oxbridge-esque level, with the wonderful use of further reading: i.e. super-curricular.


Education and Business

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

They've certainly done a lot to help themselves, which is very commendable. The balance between the two subjects is rather well blended, which can be difficult on a joint honours course.

But most of it appears unrelated to the specific course, which is the main issue. Phrases like this: "My current Advanced level studies are very demanding, but are the most beneficial academic programmes that I have taken part in." don't really add much in my view:nope:.


Primary Education AND Education Studies

The applicant here applied to do both degree courses.:cool:

Spoiler:
Show

Opening sentence not necessary: the academics know this. Other than that, a strong and passionate personal statement like most of the others. A lot more of the fantastic extra-curricular activities mentioned should be more explicitly related to the course. Again, there wasn't much mention of the things they want to study and learn about during the 3 years (which is what the PS is about).




Primary Education
Primary Education 1

Spoiler:
Show

Primary Education, with commentary.:ahee:

THIS IS A INVALUABLE RESOURCE FOR PRIMARY EDUCATION APPLICANTS!!!


Primary Education 2

Spoiler:
Show

Primary Education with commentary :gah:

ANOTHER AMAZING RESOURCE


Primary Education 3

Spoiler:
Show

Primary Education with commentary :gah:

ANOTHER AMAZING RESOURCE


Primary Education 4

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

The applicants passion and enthusiasm really shows through, but the statement itself is very descriptive of past events. Better perhaps to talk about the future, what do you want to do during your degree, and what do you want to use your degree to do afterwards?:holmes: These ideas make it clear to an admissions tutor that you have a very clear purpose in applying, are clear about what you're applying for, are driven enough to achieve it and are not going to change your mind after 3 weeks on the course.


Primary Education 5

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

A good personal statement. The candidate demonstrates a clear passion for the subject, a clear purpose in doing the degree with a specific career goal in mind. They demonstrate relevant experiences and related them to the course. There is little mention though about what they are excited to learn on this course, and more about what they already know or have experienced. The second half tends to stray away from the course subject, descending into vagueness towards the end. Keeping the subject focus consistent is a good idea and makes the PS seem coherent.


Primary Education AND Education Studies

The applicant here applied to do both degree courses.:cool:

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

Opening sentence not necessary: the academics know this. Other than that, a strong and passionate personal statement like most of the others. A lot more of the fantastic extra-curricular activities mentioned should be more explicitly related to the course. Again, there wasn't much mention of the things they want to study and learn about during the 3 years (which is what the PS is about).




Teaching:


Personal Statement 1

Spoiler:
Show

MR's comments:

Firstly, it's pretty short. Although, what is there is fairly sound, there's not really any substantiation for wanting to study. And ultimately this is an application for studying a course, which isn't mentioned much.



A note on Personal statements, our Personal Statement Advice forum is the best place to ask questions about your PS. DO NOT post your personal statement anywhere on the internet except in our PS review service private forum. Otherwise your PS will be done for plagiarism after you submit it on UCAS.
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#11
A bit about me:

Hiya guys:hi:

So my name is 04MR17. You can call me MR, or Nelson, or whatever you like really, I'll answer to most things really.

I'm studying Education and History as a dual honours 2017-2020 at Keele University.

First Year Modules include:

Education -
- Understanding Learning
- Childhood, Policy and Education
- Too poor to Learn: Poverty and Education
- Education in Britain: past, present, future

History -
- Historical Research and Writing
- History, Media and Memory
- Modern History
- Princes and Peoples in Europe

I am the Community Assistant responsible for Undergraduate Education, that means I am responsible for keeping things tidy, orderly and active.:yep: So any threads which better suit other areas of the site, it is my job to move them.

If there is anything missing from this subject guide, or any information you think is incorrect, please let me know and I'll look into it.:yes:

You can ask me a question using this thread...
0
reply
KanyesVest
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 years ago
#12
Bradford Collage, Leeds Trinity, Leeds Beckett and the university of Leeds. I felt a bit sick when I pressed submit 😂
0
reply
1secondsofvamps
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 years ago
#13
(Original post by 04MR17)
Didn't realise that 1secondsofvamps is doing ECS. :hi:
:hello:This is a great thread
If anyone wants to know more/has questions about education especially ECS then feel free to message me
0
reply
TheMathsTeacher
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
Hello

This is a brilliantly useful thread, so good on you OP!

Also, I'm currently studying at Manchester Metropolitan University, doing BSc Secondary Mathematics Education with QTS so if anyone has any questions about it, please feel free to ask me a few questions!

Something that I really need a bit of advice on, is whether there's any point in me doing a masters after my degree? I really want to do one, but I don't know if it'll be of any genuine use when I eventually come to apply for jobs etc. I've also considered doing a part time masters. That way, I get to further my knowledge AND not be hindered by the lack of experience. I'm just not sure if i'd be able to cope with the workload of being an NQT and doing a Masters degree.

Any advice or questions, send them my way!
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#15
(Original post by TheMathsTeacher)
Hello

This is a brilliantly useful thread, so good on you OP!

Also, I'm currently studying at Manchester Metropolitan University, doing BSc Secondary Mathematics Education with QTS so if anyone has any questions about it, please feel free to ask me a few questions!

Something that I really need a bit of advice on, is whether there's any point in me doing a masters after my degree? I really want to do one, but I don't know if it'll be of any genuine use when I eventually come to apply for jobs etc. I've also considered doing a part time masters. That way, I get to further my knowledge AND not be hindered by the lack of experience. I'm just not sure if i'd be able to cope with the workload of being an NQT and doing a Masters degree.

Any advice or questions, send them my way!
Thank you

You want to be a Maths Teacher right?

Would you be doing a masters in Maths?
0
reply
TheMathsTeacher
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 years ago
#16
(Original post by 04MR17)
Thank you

You want to be a Maths Teacher right?

Would you be doing a masters in Maths?
No worries!

And yes, hopefully a maths teacher!

I'd either do a masters in MSc Education (Mathematics), MSc Education (Leadership) or just an MSc Education. I'm thinking maybe doing the maths one would end up being a little restrictive?

I'd love to do a masters in straight maths, but I don't really see much point of that if I want to go into teaching if you know what i mean?
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#17
(Original post by TheMathsTeacher)
No worries!

And yes, hopefully a maths teacher!

I'd either do a masters in MSc Education (Mathematics), MSc Education (Leadership) or just an MSc Education. I'm thinking maybe doing the maths one would end up being a little restrictive?

I'd love to do a masters in straight maths, but I don't really see much point of that if I want to go into teaching if you know what i mean?
The leadership one might look a bit premature if you're doing it without any teaching experience. Most people on that course will be budding assistant heads or ambitious head's of faculty

If you have ambitions for such roles further down the line then I'd hang fire on the masters. Get a few years under your belt then go for the leadership Msc.

If your ambition is to get to HoF or being a key stage co-ordinator or an AST then maybe think about the Maths one?:dontknow:

If you might fancy branching out into other non-teaching roles further down the line like going into policy, (or Ofsted:ninja:) or doing some academic research in the field, then that one might be the thing to do.

PS please ignore me sl*gging off everyone's personal statements, I'm going to tidy the thread up in a second and tone my rude comments down
0
reply
TheMathsTeacher
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#18
Report 3 years ago
#18
(Original post by 04MR17)
The leadership one might look a bit premature if you're doing it without any teaching experience. Most people on that course will be budding assistant heads or ambitious head's of faculty

If you have ambitions for such roles further down the line then I'd hang fire on the masters. Get a few years under your belt then go for the leadership Msc.

If your ambition is to get to HoF or being a key stage co-ordinator or an AST then maybe think about the Maths one?:dontknow:

If you might fancy branching out into other non-teaching roles further down the line like going into policy, (or Ofsted:ninja:) or doing some academic research in the field, then that one might be the thing to do.

PS please ignore me sl*gging off everyone's personal statements, I'm going to tidy the thread up in a second and tone my rude comments down

Haha you've basically just taken all my thoughts and concerns from my head and put them in your post D:
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#19
(Original post by TheMathsTeacher)
Haha you've basically just taken all my thoughts and concerns from my head and put them in your post D:
:rofl:

So ultimately the question is (as I've asked at least 20 people this weekend): what's your career plan?:holmes:
0
reply
Liverpool Hope University
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#20
Report 3 years ago
#20
(Original post by 04MR17)
Education Studies
Have you ever wondered how education shapes society, and how society shapes education? Have you ever reflected upon the political nature of decisions made about, and within, educational institutions? Have you ever considered whether education systems are fair, and if everyone has the same opportunities of access, and of success? If any of those questions made you think, then the Education Studies programme may be for you.

Studying education means considering its relationship to the economy, its historical evolution, its impact on people’s life chances and identities, how education is organised, and how learners learn. When studying the subject you will be exploring the ways in which the world of education is changing and looking at education from philosophical, historical, psychological, cultural and sociological perspectives. This course examines changing ideas about childhood, learning, schooling and education, and factors such as poverty, social policies and digital technologies which impact on these.

The schools of Education within universities have three main types of students:
- Students training to be teachers. See the teacher training sub-forum.

- Professionals in Education wanting to develop their career usually through postgraduate courses.

- Students interested in education policy and reform. This is what undergraduate education is all about.

The conceptual study of education as an object of fascination, as a point of interest. An interest in trying to identify the things that underpin education: like its purpose: what is education for?

As such, issues such as equity, teacher quality, and education assessment have become focuses of many schools of education. Education and inclusion is another strong theme.

This subject, at about 30 years old, is very very new, hence such a low number of students nationally doing the subject. The subject is slowly growing in popularity. FUN FACT: at the University of Cambridge, the most popular modules for electives are in Education*.

The subject is mostly essay-based, very much like humanities or other social science courses, which means it's a popular subject in dual honours. Most common paired subjects include:

- Psychology
- History
- Sociology
- Philosophy
- English

Plenty of universities offer Education combined with more subjects too. From Maths to Geography to Theology and Religion.

PLEASE NOTE: If your career goal is to become a secondary school teacher, then at least 50% of your degree ought to be in the subject you wish to teach. So if you're interested in this subject and intend on becoming a secondary school teacher, then please considering taking a dual honours course.

If you have an interest in any of the above, then this is the right place for you. Feel free to post any questions in the forum. Also, if you're applying to do this course or a similar one for 2018 entry, then check out the applicants thread.


Spoiler:
Show



*source = they told me that when I went


Hi :hello:

I'm Ruth, a graduate from Liverpool Hope University and I studied a combined degree in Education and Special Educational Needs.

My Education course was split into 4 disciplines of Sociology, History, Philosophy and Psychology. The first area we explored for the course was the purpose of education which could be explored across all four of the disciplines.

If you have any questions at all about studying Education Studies please don't hesitate to give me a shout. Also If you also have any specific academic questions I can pass them on to an academic and we can start a good educational debate :bigsmile:

I'm also interested in your future career plans? Wanting to break the myth that Education Studies leads to being a teacher, although it can, there are lots of other career opportunities too. Does anyone have any careers in mind?
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (423)
56.4%
I don't have everything I need (327)
43.6%

Watched Threads

View All