youknownothing7
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WJEC examiners put 'listing' as a comment next to some sentences - my teacher talks about it, but I don't quite understand how else to convey the information. Can anyone give me a hand?

(An example paragraph which listed and an alternative which didn't would be nice, but just an explanation is good too)
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999tigger
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(Original post by youknownothing7)
WJEC examiners put 'listing' as a comment next to some sentences - my teacher talks about it, but I don't quite understand how else to convey the information. Can anyone give me a hand?

(An example paragraph which listed and an alternative which didn't would be nice, but just an explanation is good too)

Not enough context really, so will have to guess.

When you do History or any essay questions, then you have to answer the question.

With listing it sounds like you are just putting down information without making clear why and either hoping some of it sticks or the reader works it out.

You need to be more selective and explain why the info you are using is relevant. How does it further the answer to the questions, whats your reason or purpose behind using it? Whats he significance or implications you can draw from it?
Its the analysis and how you interpret the significance of the information is what they really want.

Its ok to list sometimes but always bring it back to how you are answering the question and why its relevant.
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StevetheIcecube
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I'll attempt to make an example, but it isn't going to be a good essay paragraph or anything:

Mussolini gained power by appealing to large groups. He did this by attacking socialists, exploiting liberal corruption and weaknesses, and appealing to industrialists and the middle classes. By doing this, he was able to gain lots of members and votes and came to power.

Mussolini gained power by appealing to large groups of people. One of the notable groups were those who did not support the Socialist movement, as while they were the largest party there were many who were afraid of their power. Because of this, he attacked them, earning the support of anti-Socialist forces such as industrialists who were threatened by nationalisation and worker's movements or the Catholic Church, who saw the anti-clerical views of the PSI as a threat. By attacking Socialists, Mussolini widened his appeal to those groups, securing funding from industrialists and official support from the Pope, which significantly widened the people he could reach in both urban and rural areas, allowing him to secure wider support and more votes so he could gain a majority in elections, helping him come to power.

See how in the first paragraph, there is a list of perfectly valid statements with little qualification, evidence or detail. Analysis is most important, as opposed to getting the highest number of points down on the page. That development, evidence, and linking the points to the overall question changes a list into a paragraph.

Idk if that makes sense or even if you're asking for A Level help as I don't think you specified. Feel free to ask some more questions if you need help!
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