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    Hi, I've been given sentences about pH regulation to put into order for homework, and it's left me baffled, as there's nothing about it in the textbook and I couldn't find anything helpful online.

    The sentences are:
    Breathing rate decreases.
    Oxygen absorbed.
    Carbon dioxide excreted.
    Medulla detects low blood pH.
    Increase in respiration.
    Carbon dioxide produced.
    Lactic acid produced.
    Bicarbonate and Hydrogen ions form.
    Blood pH drops.
    Buffers absorb Hydrogen ions.
    Nervous signal to diaphragm and intercostal muscles.
    Bicarbonate and Hydrogen ions produce Carbon dioxide and water.
    Lactic acid oxidised.
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    Are you sure the order is correct? I'll try and describe what could be happening here.

    So blood pH has to be kept in a narrow range. Ideally thats around 7.4-7.5, no lower or higher. Usually the body produces lots of acids through its regular function. If the amount of these isn't kept in check by homeostasis mechanisms, we get acidosis. There are two kinds of acidosis:

    1) Respiratory acidosis. This is where the cause of acidosis is due to breathing-specifically, a lack of it. If your breathing rate drops for whatever reason, you breath in less oxygen. This can increase the amount of anaerobic respiration you do (meaning more lactic acid) but it also decreases the amount of carbon dioxide you breath out. Carbon dioxide dissolves in water to make an acid (Carbonic acid), so breathing out removes this acid from the blood. Less breathing-less loss of carbon dioxide-more acid in blood.

    This is usually compensated for by the kidneys release lots of bicarbonate ions, which "mop up" the acidic ions (H+ ions).

    2) Metabolic acidosis. This is where the kidneys don't release as many bicarbonate ions, as I said just above. If they don't do this, then the pH drop is detected in the brain again, and the medulla makes you breath quicker. This is respiratory compensation-to try and make you breath out more, remove carbon dioxide from your blood and make you respire more aerobically to get the energy to clear lactic acid.


    Alkalosis is the opposite of this-and its usually caused by your body producing too little acid for whatever reason, but your sentences didn't mention that.

    Hope this helps, let me know if anything needs clearing up
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    (Original post by QuentinM)
    Are you sure the order is correct? I'll try and describe what could be happening here.

    So blood pH has to be kept in a narrow range. Ideally thats around 7.4-7.5, no lower or higher. Usually the body produces lots of acids through its regular function. If the amount of these isn't kept in check by homeostasis mechanisms, we get acidosis. There are two kinds of acidosis:

    1) Respiratory acidosis. This is where the cause of acidosis is due to breathing-specifically, a lack of it. If your breathing rate drops for whatever reason, you breath in less oxygen. This can increase the amount of anaerobic respiration you do (meaning more lactic acid) but it also decreases the amount of carbon dioxide you breath out. Carbon dioxide dissolves in water to make an acid (Carbonic acid), so breathing out removes this acid from the blood. Less breathing-less loss of carbon dioxide-more acid in blood.

    This is usually compensated for by the kidneys release lots of bicarbonate ions, which "mop up" the acidic ions (H+ ions).

    2) Metabolic acidosis. This is where the kidneys don't release as many bicarbonate ions, as I said just above. If they don't do this, then the pH drop is detected in the brain again, and the medulla makes you breath quicker. This is respiratory compensation-to try and make you breath out more, remove carbon dioxide from your blood and make you respire more aerobically to get the energy to clear lactic acid.


    Alkalosis is the opposite of this-and its usually caused by your body producing too little acid for whatever reason, but your sentences didn't mention that.

    Hope this helps, let me know if anything needs clearing up
    Hey, good explanation, just a couple of things, blood pH is regulated between 7.35 and 7.45 (small difference to what you said I know, but it's important to be accurate in medicine!), also, lactic acidosis is a type of metabolic acidosis rather than respiratory, and you wouldn't get lactic acidosis from anaerobic respiration as such, unless you have sepsis (which causes hypoperfusion of organs), you can also get it from liver disease among other things
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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    Hey, good explanation, just a couple of things, blood pH is regulated between 7.35 and 7.45 (small difference to what you said I know, but it's important to be accurate in medicine!), also, lactic acidosis is a type of metabolic acidosis rather than respiratory, and you wouldn't get lactic acidosis from anaerobic respiration as such, unless you have sepsis (which causes hypoperfusion of organs), you can also get it from liver disease among other things
    Thanks for saving me. I was trying to remember those numbers from like 3 years ago when I last studied this.

    Lactic acid would be a type of metabolic acidosis actually, yeah. Due to failure to metabolise it properly-like as you say in liver disease.
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    (Original post by QuentinM)
    Are you sure the order is correct? I'll try and describe what could be happening here.

    So blood pH has to be kept in a narrow range. Ideally thats around 7.4-7.5, no lower or higher. Usually the body produces lots of acids through its regular function. If the amount of these isn't kept in check by homeostasis mechanisms, we get acidosis. There are two kinds of acidosis:

    1) Respiratory acidosis. This is where the cause of acidosis is due to breathing-specifically, a lack of it. If your breathing rate drops for whatever reason, you breath in less oxygen. This can increase the amount of anaerobic respiration you do (meaning more lactic acid) but it also decreases the amount of carbon dioxide you breath out. Carbon dioxide dissolves in water to make an acid (Carbonic acid), so breathing out removes this acid from the blood. Less breathing-less loss of carbon dioxide-more acid in blood.

    This is usually compensated for by the kidneys release lots of bicarbonate ions, which "mop up" the acidic ions (H+ ions).

    2) Metabolic acidosis. This is where the kidneys don't release as many bicarbonate ions, as I said just above. If they don't do this, then the pH drop is detected in the brain again, and the medulla makes you breath quicker. This is respiratory compensation-to try and make you breath out more, remove carbon dioxide from your blood and make you respire more aerobically to get the energy to clear lactic acid.


    Alkalosis is the opposite of this-and its usually caused by your body producing too little acid for whatever reason, but your sentences didn't mention that.

    Hope this helps, let me know if anything needs clearing up
    Thanks, it makes more sense to me now.

    And no, this was just the order the statements were given in.
    Do you know how Co2 gets produced in repsonse to a low blood pH?
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    (Original post by Shadow~)
    Thanks, it makes more sense to me now.

    And no, this was just the order the statements were given in.
    Do you know how Co2 gets produced in repsonse to a low blood pH?
    Other way around. CO2 is produced during normal respiration, but removed from the blood poorly if breathing rate falls too low. THIS makes blood pH go lower
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    (Original post by QuentinM)
    Other way around. CO2 is produced during normal respiration, but removed from the blood poorly if breathing rate falls too low. THIS makes blood pH go lower
    thanks!
 
 
 
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