SBizzy
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Hello everyone, I just started Year 10. I need help on Macbeth, I understand the storyline, but i need help with the 'context' for e.g. How does shakespeare use language to show Macbeth's emotion?

Please could someone help me with this, thank you!!!!!!!!
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CinnamonSmol
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So you need to understand the play well enough that when you are presented a scene you are able to establish where it's from immediately. If you're given the scene with Macbeth's solilquy of 'Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow' then the first thing you'd state is what happened to prior and why it affects the scene now. Eg, this scene is immediatley after Macbeth learns the news of his wife's death, presumably by suicide. Here, we can see how Macbeth reacts which is important as it signifies the relationship between the two of them yada yada, then you'd start making points in next para's.

When it comes to Macbeth's emotions think, what is Macbeth saying and more specifically, what ISN'T he saying? Is there any hidden meanings or metaphors between his words that reflect his current state of mind? It's always great to compare current Macbeth with Macbeth from the start of the play for contrast too. Also, KNOW YOUR QUOTES!

Seeing as you're in year 10, it's great that you want to do well but I wouldn't begin 'revising' just yet, work hard in lesson and slowly begin to make notes or at least just focus on fully understanding your material and you'll be fine. On TSR it looks like you should be revising from Year 8 but honestly, begin to properly revise in Year 11, don't work yourself over it too much. Also, if you don't understand content or can't fully grasp how to write the essays properly its fine. It took me a while to fully understand how to actually structure and analyse in my essays, beginning of year 10 I got 4's and 5's and then year 11 I got 9's. It takes time and practise so don't stress too much you're only in year 10
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elizabeth20013
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I agree with CinnamonSmol above, but I do know that Year Tens at my school have to do their Literature exams at the end of year ten instead of year eleven, so if that is the case for you then I completely understand that you're worried now. It's always good to start revising at the start of the year, rather than leaving it until the summer. I would say make flashcards of Act/scene summaries so that you know exactly where plot points fit in and then start making quote flashcards for each scene, with limited analysis that you can then build on in an exam. I'm in Year Eleven right now and having your exact problem - closed-book English Lit is hard, so don't worry if you're struggling with it now
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SBizzy
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(Original post by CinnamonSmol)
So you need to understand the play well enough that when you are presented a scene you are able to establish where it's from immediately. If you're given the scene with Macbeth's solilquy of 'Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow' then the first thing you'd state is what happened to prior and why it affects the scene now. Eg, this scene is immediatley after Macbeth learns the news of his wife's death, presumably by suicide. Here, we can see how Macbeth reacts which is important as it signifies the relationship between the two of them yada yada, then you'd start making points in next para's.

When it comes to Macbeth's emotions think, what is Macbeth saying and more specifically, what ISN'T he saying? Is there any hidden meanings or metaphors between his words that reflect his current state of mind? It's always great to compare current Macbeth with Macbeth from the start of the play for contrast too. Also, KNOW YOUR QUOTES!

Seeing as you're in year 10, it's great that you want to do well but I wouldn't begin 'revising' just yet, work hard in lesson and slowly begin to make notes or at least just focus on fully understanding your material and you'll be fine. On TSR it looks like you should be revising from Year 8 but honestly, begin to properly revise in Year 11, don't work yourself over it too much. Also, if you don't understand content or can't fully grasp how to write the essays properly its fine. It took me a while to fully understand how to actually structure and analyse in my essays, beginning of year 10 I got 4's and 5's and then year 11 I got 9's. It takes time and practise so don't stress too much you're only in year 10
I feel that I'm slightly lacking in class, and my teacher isn't really good. Also I don't know how to answer the macbeth essay questions...
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SBizzy
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[QUOTE=elizabeth20013;73868086]I agree with CinnamonSmol above, but I do know that Year Tens at my school have to do their Literature exams at the end of year ten instead of year eleven, so if that is the case for you then I completely understand that you're worried now. It's always good to start revising at the start of the year, rather than leaving it until the summer. I would say make flashcards of Act/scene summaries so that you know exactly where plot points fit in and then start making quote flashcards for each scene, with limited analysis that you can then build on in an exam. I'm in Year Eleven right now and having your exact problem - closed-book English Lit is hard, so don't worry if you're struggling with it now [/QUOTE
Thank you, but I'm currently in a crisis
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elizabeth20013
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[QUOTE=SBizzy;73872526]
(Original post by elizabeth20013)
I agree with CinnamonSmol above, but I do know that Year Tens at my school have to do their Literature exams at the end of year ten instead of year eleven, so if that is the case for you then I completely understand that you're worried now. It's always good to start revising at the start of the year, rather than leaving it until the summer. I would say make flashcards of Act/scene summaries so that you know exactly where plot points fit in and then start making quote flashcards for each scene, with limited analysis that you can then build on in an exam. I'm in Year Eleven right now and having your exact problem - closed-book English Lit is hard, so don't worry if you're struggling with it now [/QUOTE
Thank you, but I'm currently in a crisis
But are you doing the GCSE at the end of this year or next?
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SBizzy
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[QUOTE=elizabeth20013;73875926]
(Original post by SBizzy)

But are you doing the GCSE at the end of this year or next?
I'm doing my gcse's next year, I'm currently in Year 10.
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CinnamonSmol
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(Original post by SBizzy)
I feel that I'm slightly lacking in class, and my teacher isn't really good. Also I don't know how to answer the macbeth essay questions...
i see well I think that even if you have low self confidence, don't! You're work is much better than you realise and when you're confident in your work you tend to perform way better. I know that one of the reasons I did so well was because I focussed on why my work was good rather than why it was bad. Give your work to other teachers to mark, extra essays and whatnot and also read examiner reports.

Most essays are similarly structured, follow PEEL(point evidence explain and link) and incorporate quotes into your evidence. Try and mirror the question in your answer eg. if the question is 'How is macbeths state of mind reflected in this scene?' you should try and say something like 'this reflects that macbeths current state of mind is....' with enough practise you'll be fine
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SBizzy
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(Original post by CinnamonSmol)
i see well I think that even if you have low self confidence, don't! You're work is much better than you realise and when you're confident in your work you tend to perform way better. I know that one of the reasons I did so well was because I focussed on why my work was good rather than why it was bad. Give your work to other teachers to mark, extra essays and whatnot and also read examiner reports.

Most essays are similarly structured, follow PEEL(point evidence explain and link) and incorporate quotes into your evidence. Try and mirror the question in your answer eg. if the question is 'How is macbeths state of mind reflected in this scene?' you should try and say something like 'this reflects that macbeths current state of mind is....' with enough practise you'll be fine
Thanks, maybe I kept on doubting. Our teacher gave us the Macbeth book to read, should i read more to have a better understanding, even though i know the story line for e.g Macbeth life starts to go downhill from becoming the thane of cawdor and his wife encourages him to do evil things… Just need to improve my essay answers then I think I will be alright
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CinnamonSmol
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(Original post by SBizzy)
Thanks, maybe I kept on doubting. Our teacher gave us the Macbeth book to read, should i read more to have a better understanding, even though i know the story line for e.g Macbeth life starts to go downhill from becoming the thane of cawdor and his wife encourages him to do evil things… Just need to improve my essay answers then I think I will be alright
wait, you havent read the story/analysing the text in class?! if so then you need to read it and annotate the pages otherwise you wont understand it except from a superficial level
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SBizzy
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(Original post by CinnamonSmol)
wait, you havent read the story/analysing the text in class?! if so then you need to read it and annotate the pages otherwise you wont understand it except from a superficial level
We have annotated the pages in the book, but our teacher isn't good enough to teach.
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