Fonzworth
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I'm considering doing a degree in Geology/Earth Sciences (and maybe Geophysics but that would require a foundation year) as I enjoy the various aspects of it such as volcanology, seismology, environmental geology, hydrogeology, oil & gas exploration and maybe something nuclear related as I really enjoy that side of Physics.

Anyways, I heard that there was a shortage of Geologists, but apparently, it's hard to find a job. Would it also be wise to do this when there may be a huge decrease of fossil fuels in the next few years?

If I can't work for an oil and gas company then is there anything else I could do like mining, volcanoes, the energy industry and weather-related like dealing/predicting with hurricanes, storms etc?
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nemoshish
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There is always Job, Maybe not in UK, you can find it in rest of the world considering what is happening around the world right now, I doubt there is shortage of geologist outside the UK.
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rosiesaurus
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(Original post by Fonzworth)
I'm considering doing a degree in Geology/Earth Sciences (and maybe Geophysics but that would require a foundation year) as I enjoy the various aspects of it such as volcanology, seismology, environmental geology, hydrogeology, oil & gas exploration and maybe something nuclear related as I really enjoy that side of Physics.

Anyways, I heard that there was a shortage of Geologists, but apparently, it's hard to find a job. Would it also be wise to do this when there may be a huge decrease of fossil fuels in the next few years?

If I can't work for an oil and gas company then is there anything else I could do like mining, volcanoes, the energy industry and weather-related like dealing/predicting with hurricanes, storms etc?
There are currently plenty of jobs in the UK in environmental/engineering geology and geotechnics and that's what the vast majority of grads I know have gone into. Another option is aggregates and quarrying, and working in the cement industry has ties with nuclear. At the moment, oil and gas is in a downturn so without a masters degree/experience it is pretty impossible to get into the industry. Similar with minerals exploration, however commodities have boom and bust cycles so things will probably have picked up by the time you would graduate Volcanology in the UK is pretty much purely research and academia based, requiring a PhD to get into, and jobs in hazards are going to be all abroad.

It's a fascinating subject though, and a really fun degree so if you enjoy it and can see yourself studying it for 3+ years then go for it! You'll pick up loads of useful transferable skills so even if you don't want a career in geology there are plenty of other options out there!
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Fonzworth
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(Original post by rosiesaurus)
There are currently plenty of jobs in the UK in environmental/engineering geology and geotechnics and that's what the vast majority of grads I know have gone into. Another option is aggregates and quarrying, and working in the cement industry has ties with nuclear. At the moment, oil and gas is in a downturn so without a masters degree/experience it is pretty impossible to get into the industry. Similar with minerals exploration, however commodities have boom and bust cycles so things will probably have picked up by the time you would graduate Volcanology in the UK is pretty much purely research and academia based, requiring a PhD to get into, and jobs in hazards are going to be all abroad.

It's a fascinating subject though, and a really fun degree so if you enjoy it and can see yourself studying it for 3+ years then go for it! You'll pick up loads of useful transferable skills so even if you don't want a career in geology there are plenty of other options out there!
Thank you for this. Out of all the geoscience different degrees, which one do you think will be most useful and most employable?
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rosiesaurus
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(Original post by Fonzworth)
Thank you for this. Out of all the geoscience different degrees, which one do you think will be most useful and most employable?
That's pretty difficult to say tbh. If you're not sure about where your interests lie/which career you want you're best off with just straight geology and then potentially switch to 'geology with X' once you're at university and get a better idea of what you enjoy. For that reason, look at what options each department has, and if you can choose modules etc. If you are interested in meteorology and atmospheric things you may be better off with Earth Science as opposed to geology just because it is slightly broader.

Your best bet is to research different courses and module options, and pick whatever sounds most interesting to you, at a university/city that you will enjoy living in. If you are happy and enjoy it you are more likely to succeed
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