CeliniRoy
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What is the advantages and disadvantages of Google sketch-up and also 2D designs?
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Den987
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(Original post by CeliniRoy)
What is the advantages and disadvantages of Google sketch-up and also 2D designs?
Google Sketchup has advantages like :
Simple interface
Proven easy to be used by a rookie
Tools which are very easy to remember
Many Open Source Plugin
Light weight program for a 3D program
There is an import feature from pdf, jpg, 3ds, dwg,, etc
3D warehouse for easy components
It's Free but can make satisfying results
Compatible for low end computers

Disadvantages are :
Its proven hard to be use for a more complex modeling even when plugin is used.
It will crash when rendering a lot of patch and vertex surfaces for example “importing a human model from 3ds max to sketchup”
Less Modern tools than other 3D programs

2D advantages are:
Same graphical representation
Easier collaboration

Disadvantages are:
Less suited for concept design
Harder to explore alternate ideas
Difficult to use for prototyping
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CeliniRoy
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(Original post by Den987)
Google Sketchup has advantages like :
Simple interface
Proven easy to be used by a rookie
Tools which are very easy to remember
Many Open Source Plugin
Light weight program for a 3D program
There is an import feature from pdf, jpg, 3ds, dwg,, etc
3D warehouse for easy components
It's Free but can make satisfying results
Compatible for low end computers

Disadvantages are :
Its proven hard to be use for a more complex modeling even when plugin is used.
It will crash when rendering a lot of patch and vertex surfaces for example “importing a human model from 3ds max to sketchup”
Less Modern tools than other 3D programs

2D advantages are:
Same graphical representation
Easier collaboration

Disadvantages are:
Less suited for concept design
Harder to explore alternate ideas
Difficult to use for prototyping

Thank you!
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Den987
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(Original post by CeliniRoy)
Thank you!
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CeliniRoy
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(Original post by Den987)
Hi I was wondering if you could help me with what I should talk about for the design constraints and what ergonomic measurements I should use. We have a graphics teacher that doesn't know anything and since we are behind in coursework he is making us to do Independent studies outside of school. I will be grateful if you able to give me idea for design constraints and ergonomic. Thank you
MY DESIGN TASK 4 – Using appropriate graphical materials design and make a true to scale kit for a building that will be sold flat packed ready to sale.
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Den987
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(Original post by CeliniRoy)
Hi I was wondering if you could help me with what I should talk about for the design constraints and what ergonomic measurements I should use. We have a graphics teacher that doesn't know anything and since we are behind in coursework he is making us to do Independent studies outside of school. I will be grateful if you able to give me idea for design constraints and ergonomic. Thank you
MY DESIGN TASK 4 – Using appropriate graphical materials design and make a true to scale kit for a building that will be sold flat packed ready to sale.

Design constraints are limitations on a design. These include imposed limitations that you don't control and limitations that are self-imposed limitations as a way to improve a design. You can talk about any of the following:

Commercial Constraints: Basic commercial constraints such as time and budget.

Requirements: Functional requirements such as specifications of features for a website.

Compliance to applicable laws, regulations and standards.

Style: A style guide or multiple style guides related to an organization, brand, product, service, environment or project. For example, a product development team may follow a style guide for a brand family that constrains the colors and layout of package designs.

Sensory Design: Beyond visual design, constraints may apply to taste, touch, sound and smell. For example, a brand identity that calls for products to smell fruity.

Usability principles, frameworks and standards. For example, the principle of least astonishment.

Principles: The design principles of an organization, team or individual. For example, a designer who uses form follows function to constrain designs.

Integration: A design that needs to work with other things such as products, services, systems, processes, controls, partners and information.

Ergonomics can help address the physical and environmental stresses that might be associated with an activity:

Physical stresses might include repetitive motions, vibration, or working in awkward positions, and so on.

Environmental stresses might include indoor air quality, excessive noise or improper lighting, which may induce conditions such as ‘sick building syndrome’.

Cognitive stresses might include situational awareness, high cognitive workload, complex decision-making processes, attention and communication, and so on.

As construction of a building is a physically demanding work environment, site workers are often at risk of long-term injury. Back sprains and strains are the most common disabling injuries, often due to overexertion and bodily motion.

(These all correspond to the number in front. For example, Types of work 1 is related to Risk 1, which is related to Ergonomics 1 only)

TYPE OF WORK :

1. Tasks that involve low work, such as using factory tools, tying rebar, hand screeding concrete.

2. Work that involves repetitive kneeling.

3. Bending and twisting body during masonry or roofing work.

4. Overhead drilling work.

5. Lifting heavy blocks.

6. Lifting large windows and sheet materials.

7. Using hand-held power tools that produce a lot of vibration.

8. Sitting at an office desk for long periods of time.

RISK:

1. Require repetitive bending, kneeling and squatting. Can cause fatigue, pain and injury.

2. Kneeling on a hard surface puts a lot of direct pressure on knees. Working in kneeling positions for long periods of time can lead to problems such as knee osteoarthritis.

3. Frequent stooping causes fatigue and puts stress on lower back, increasing chance of injury. Risk of injury also high if twisting quickly, especially when handling heavy objects.

4. Long periods of keeping arms and neck in fixed, hard-to-hold positions can lead to serious muscle or joint injuries.

5. Can cause fatigue and strain, may lead to injury.

6. Puts stress on back and shoulders. Injuries can be more serious when having to work in awkward positions or holding materials for long periods of time. Manual placing can also lead to hand injuries.

7. After long periods of exposure ‘white finger’ can develop or ‘hand-arm vibration syndrome’ (HAVS).

8. Can result in repetitive strain injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

ERGONOMIC DESIGN SOLUTION:

1. Auto-feed screw guns with extension, motorized screeds, rebar-tying tools, all enable the worker to stand upright while operating.

2. Portable kneeling creeper with chest support reduces stress to knees, ankles and lower back.

3. Split-level adjustable scaffolding allows for less stooping because the materials and work surface are kept near waist-height which is more comfortable and stresses the body less.

4. Bit extension shaft for drill or screw gun so it can be held below shoulder and closer to the waist.

5. Lightweight concrete blocks weigh considerably less than solid blocks and can be carried easier.

6. Vacuum lifters can be used, which attach to windows and flat panels and remove the need for manual handling.

7. Reduced vibration power tools are designed to produce less vibration. Use along with anti-vibration gloves.

8. Maintain comfortable height and distance from desk and screen. Adjustable desks are available that allow a person to use it from a standing position. Ergonomically designed computer equipment is also available.
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CeliniRoy
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(Original post by den987)
design constraints are limitations on a design. These include imposed limitations that you don't control and limitations that are self-imposed limitations as a way to improve a design. You can talk about any of the following:

commercial constraints: basic commercial constraints such as time and budget.

requirements: functional requirements such as specifications of features for a website.

compliance to applicable laws, regulations and standards.

style: a style guide or multiple style guides related to an organization, brand, product, service, environment or project. For example, a product development team may follow a style guide for a brand family that constrains the colors and layout of package designs.

sensory design: beyond visual design, constraints may apply to taste, touch, sound and smell. For example, a brand identity that calls for products to smell fruity.

usability principles, frameworks and standards. for example, the principle of least astonishment.

principles: the design principles of an organization, team or individual. For example, a designer who uses form follows function to constrain designs.

integration: a design that needs to work with other things such as products, services, systems, processes, controls, partners and information.

ergonomics can help address the physical and environmental stresses that might be associated with an activity:

physical stresses might include repetitive motions, vibration, or working in awkward positions, and so on.

environmental stresses might include indoor air quality, excessive noise or improper lighting, which may induce conditions such as ‘sick building syndrome’.

cognitive stresses might include situational awareness, high cognitive workload, complex decision-making processes, attention and communication, and so on.

As construction of a building is a physically demanding work environment, site workers are often at risk of long-term injury. Back sprains and strains are the most common disabling injuries, often due to overexertion and bodily motion.

(these all correspond to the number in front. For example, types of work 1 is related to risk 1, which is related to ergonomics 1 only)

type of work :

1. Tasks that involve low work, such as using factory tools, tying rebar, hand screeding concrete.

2. Work that involves repetitive kneeling.

3. Bending and twisting body during masonry or roofing work.

4. Overhead drilling work.

5. Lifting heavy blocks.

6. Lifting large windows and sheet materials.

7. Using hand-held power tools that produce a lot of vibration.

8. Sitting at an office desk for long periods of time.

risk:

1. Require repetitive bending, kneeling and squatting. Can cause fatigue, pain and injury.

2. Kneeling on a hard surface puts a lot of direct pressure on knees. Working in kneeling positions for long periods of time can lead to problems such as knee osteoarthritis.

3. Frequent stooping causes fatigue and puts stress on lower back, increasing chance of injury. Risk of injury also high if twisting quickly, especially when handling heavy objects.

4. Long periods of keeping arms and neck in fixed, hard-to-hold positions can lead to serious muscle or joint injuries.

5. Can cause fatigue and strain, may lead to injury.

6. Puts stress on back and shoulders. Injuries can be more serious when having to work in awkward positions or holding materials for long periods of time. Manual placing can also lead to hand injuries.

7. After long periods of exposure ‘white finger’ can develop or ‘hand-arm vibration syndrome’ (havs).

8. Can result in repetitive strain injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

ergonomic design solution:

1. Auto-feed screw guns with extension, motorized screeds, rebar-tying tools, all enable the worker to stand upright while operating.

2. Portable kneeling creeper with chest support reduces stress to knees, ankles and lower back.

3. Split-level adjustable scaffolding allows for less stooping because the materials and work surface are kept near waist-height which is more comfortable and stresses the body less.

4. Bit extension shaft for drill or screw gun so it can be held below shoulder and closer to the waist.

5. Lightweight concrete blocks weigh considerably less than solid blocks and can be carried easier.

6. Vacuum lifters can be used, which attach to windows and flat panels and remove the need for manual handling.

7. Reduced vibration power tools are designed to produce less vibration. Use along with anti-vibration gloves.

8. Maintain comfortable height and distance from desk and screen. Adjustable desks are available that allow a person to use it from a standing position. Ergonomically designed computer equipment is also available.
OMG YOU ARE THE BEST! Thank you so much!
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Den987
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(Original post by CeliniRoy)
OMG YOU ARE THE BEST! Thank you so much!
:shakehand:
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