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    Hiya, I am struggling to find a couple of good sixth forms that have Law A level courses. I want to study Law in University but other than Law I'm not sure what other A-levels are required. So do I really need Law A level and what other A levels should I take?
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    Don't do law. Universities actually look down on law a-level and Cambridge, LSE and other "top" universities frown upon it.

    With law, do essay subjects, such as history, english, economics, geography etc. or even a science.
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    Few universities look down on law as an A-level subject now - they used to a good decade ago but times have changed.

    But you don't need Law A-level to do an legal course, and many will argue it won't be of any benefit for you to study a law course before you start a law degree.
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    (Original post by ed98)
    Don't do law. Universities actually look down on law a-level and Cambridge, LSE and other "top" universities frown upon it.

    With law, do essay subjects, such as history, english, economics, geography etc. or even a science.
    Nonsense. Law is perfectly fine. Stop misleading people.

    http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...y-Requirements
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    You need three top A level grades. It doesnt matter what subjects these are in - you could be doing 3 sciences.

    So, Law isnt necessary at A level, and it isnt expected that you wil previously have studied it. Any 'essay based subject' is a good idea - simply because it will give you good skills with text, analysis, writing. It also exposes you to some of the 'social' issues involved in Law. So something like History, Politics, Sociology is worth doing. But the most important thing is A grades - so pick the 3 subjects where you are most likely to achieve this.
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    Pick your best three subjects. Even sciences are fine (they're particularly handy if you might be interested intellectual property). I did maths, chemistry biology myself.
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    Currently in year 13 and applying for law. I'm doing Maths, Chemistry and History. A good friend of mine is a solicitor at a big London firm and she says that having a mix of sciences and essay subjects will stand you in good stead for a law degree. However, most unis don't care as long as you have at least 2 facilitating subjects so just pick subjects you enjoy and are good at.
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    Law, nor any other subject, is required to study Law. Contrary to popular opinion, Law isn't "frowned upon" by any major university I am aware of. However, the key point universities stress is that it doesn't convey an advantage, so unless you're unsure of your decision there's no reason to study it over another academic subject you can do well in.

    While no subject is required, History is often considered useful as academic preparation for any essay based subject at university, not merely History itself (and related things such as Classics). Provided you don't take any subjects which are actually "non-preferred", which are to a one non-academic, applied, and vocational subjects, and often creative arts subjects. Examples include Accounting, Health and Social Care, and ICT. Business Studies is sometimes included here (for example, by LSE) and generally Economics is considered preferable to Business Studies. "Traditional" creative arts subjects like Fine Art, Drama, and Music are fairly variable, and it depends on the course whether they're acceptable. It's safest to pursue them either as a 4th subject, or extracurricularly. "Applied" or vocational arts subjects like Textiles and Graphic Design are almost always considered "non-preferred".

    In general, "non-preferred" subjects are usually only acceptable as single third option at best, and are usually preferred as a fourth option, and in the latter case may not be part of an offer. This is for law specifically, although applies to similar academically rigorous courses. The overriding thing they want to see from students is that they've engaged in an academically rigorous curriculum and excelled in it - whether this is in humanities and social science subjects or STEM subjects, or some combination thereof, they don't mind. Additionally only three subjects are required, for almost any course (Law included).
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    It was only in the past that universities looked down on Law A-Level. You don't need any A-Level.

    Law A-Level is a lot harder than it used to be, especially since the new spec. It's actually ranked in the same difficulty as subjects like psychology. There is a lot of writing as well. So whilst it won't add a huge advantage, it's not going to hinder you at all.

    I would say that if you're planning on taking Law at Uni, Law A-Level is fine as long as you have 2 facilitating subjects. That's what I'm doing. I chose Law, and then History, as it's an essay subject, and French. I'm happy I chose Law, because it's helped me to decide I definitely want to do Law. After all, I don't want to pay £9000 a year to find out I hate the course It's also really interesting, so I know I'll work hard at it.
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    Your ultimate speciality is likely to be driven by your natural inclination towards what you find interesting. So if you find maths interesting, you might consider doing tax law. Those involved in international legal project management might find that they use their languages in their work.

    What I'm trying to say is, recognise your existing strengths and carry on with them. They may end up directing your career simply because they are your interests.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    You need three top A level grades. It doesnt matter what subjects these are in - you could be doing 3 sciences.

    So, Law isnt necessary at A level, and it isnt expected that you wil previously have studied it. Any 'essay based subject' is a good idea - simply because it will give you good skills with text, analysis, writing. It also exposes you to some of the 'social' issues involved in Law. So something like History, Politics, Sociology is worth doing. But the most important thing is A grades - so pick the 3 subjects where you are most likely to achieve this.


    Ah ok thank you, I'm also considering Government and Politics, would this benefit me?
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    (Original post by LlamaLikeEllie)
    It was only in the past that universities looked down on Law A-Level. You don't need any A-Level.

    Law A-Level is a lot harder than it used to be, especially since the new spec. It's actually ranked in the same difficulty as subjects like psychology. There is a lot of writing as well. So whilst it won't add a huge advantage, it's not going to hinder you at all.

    I would say that if you're planning on taking Law at Uni, Law A-Level is fine as long as you have 2 facilitating subjects. That's what I'm doing. I chose Law, and then History, as it's an essay subject, and French. I'm happy I chose Law, because it's helped me to decide I definitely want to do Law. After all, I don't want to pay £9000 a year to find out I hate the course It's also really interesting, so I know I'll work hard at it.
    Ok thanks, I'm thinking of taking French as well, do universities like modern foreign languages though?
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    (Original post by ed98)
    Don't do law. Universities actually look down on law a-level and Cambridge, LSE and other "top" universities frown upon it.

    With law, do essay subjects, such as history, english, economics, geography etc. or even a science.
    Oh wow, ok thanks, also do top universities requires an entrance exam and A level results or just A level results?
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    (Original post by Bubs051213)
    Currently in year 13 and applying for law. I'm doing Maths, Chemistry and History. A good friend of mine is a solicitor at a big London firm and she says that having a mix of sciences and essay subjects will stand you in good stead for a law degree. However, most unis don't care as long as you have at least 2 facilitating subjects so just pick subjects you enjoy and are good at.
    Ok, also do you think I should have a bit of experience before I apply for uni , for example, work experience in a law firm?
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    (Original post by qwertyuiopas_)
    Ah ok thank you, I'm also considering Government and Politics, would this benefit me?
    Very useful.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiopas_)
    Ok, also do you think I should have a bit of experience before I apply for uni , for example, work experience in a law firm?
    Yes, and just sitting in the public gallery in any court for a few days can also be useful.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiopas_)
    Ah ok thank you, I'm also considering Government and Politics, would this benefit me?
    Do the subject that you think you will enjoy and do best in, in terms of grades.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiopas_)
    Ok thanks, I'm thinking of taking French as well, do universities like modern foreign languages though?
    Yes, anything you will do well in.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiopas_)
    Ok thanks, I'm thinking of taking French as well, do universities like modern foreign languages though?
    Yes definitely! It's on the facilitating subject list, and is ranked in the same way as subjects like Chemistry, and English Lit. Infact, not many people do language A-Levels, so it will probably set you apart
 
 
 
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