username1150460
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So a few years ago I was told that some subjects like Accounting, Psychology, and Law are non-traditional and not seen very well for uni admissions (especially Oxbridge). My understanding was that the traditional ones are basically the sciences, economics, literature, and history.

However, I just saw last week that these are now listed under LSE's list of traditional subjects... Now I'm just confused. Could someone please clarify this for me? xx And I would appreciate it if you could let me know the differences (if there are any in terms of perception!) for Oxbridge.
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Ruthie2267
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(Original post by likezerogravity)
So a few years ago I was told that some subjects like Accounting, Psychology, and Law are non-traditional and not seen very well for uni admissions (especially Oxbridge). My understanding was that the traditional ones are basically the sciences, economics, literature, and history. However, I just saw last week that these are now listed under LSE's list of traditional subjects... Now I'm just confused. Could someone please clarify this for me? xx And I would appreciate it if you could let me know the differences (if there are any in terms of perception!) for Oxbridge.
I think there is still a perception that certain more 'academic' subjects are superior in terms of university applications - the so-called facilitating subjects (see page 26 onwards: http://russellgroup.ac.uk/media/5457...oices-2016.pdf).

I wouldn't say your examples are non-traditional as such, but neither would I (and I don't think many would yet) class them as facilitating. That's not to say they aren't 'proper' subjects, or that they're 'soft' or anything silly, just that in terms of uni applications they're not core unlike History, Maths, Sciences etc etc.

HOWEVER, saying that, sensible A Level combinations depend entirely on what you'll be applying for. If you apply for Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Cambridge, doing Psychology and Sociology might benefit you (although according to Trinity at least you're not required to have anything: https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/undergrad...-combinations/). And if you want to go into a certain career then you obviously have to choose things related to that (see: https://www.cife.org.uk/article/choo...evel-subjects/)

Tl;dr: if you're looking at Oxbridge then I wouldn't say your examples are 'traditional'. Choosing two facilitating subjects is a good bet (although I know people who only did one and got an offer) and then the third is up to you. But ABOVE ALL check individual course requirements - some unis want different things - and choose things you enjoy!! There is no point whatsoever in forcing yourself to do subjects you deem as better for oxbridge if you're going to hate them and therefore probably do less well

(PS sorry ik this is long winded but I hope it helped haha)
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TheAlchemistress
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(Original post by Ruthie2267)
I think there is still a perception that certain more 'academic' subjects are superior in terms of university applications - the so-called facilitating subjects (see page 26 onwards: http://russellgroup.ac.uk/media/5457...oices-2016.pdf).

I wouldn't say your examples are non-traditional as such, but neither would I (and I don't think many would yet) class them as facilitating. That's not to say they aren't 'proper' subjects, or that they're 'soft' or anything silly, just that in terms of uni applications they're not core unlike History, Maths, Sciences etc etc.

HOWEVER, saying that, sensible A Level combinations depend entirely on what you'll be applying for. If you apply for Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Cambridge, doing Psychology and Sociology might benefit you (although according to Trinity at least you're not required to have anything: https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/undergrad...-combinations/). And if you want to go into a certain career then you obviously have to choose things related to that (see: https://www.cife.org.uk/article/choo...evel-subjects/)

Tl;dr: if you're looking at Oxbridge then I wouldn't say your examples are 'traditional'. Choosing two facilitating subjects is a good bet (although I know people who only did one and got an offer) and then the third is up to you. But ABOVE ALL choose things you enjoy!! There is no point whatsoever in forcing yourself to do subjects you deem as better for oxbridge if you're going to hate them and therefore probably do less well

(PS sorry ik this is long winded but I hope it helped haha)
what would you think of these combinations?

fine-art
english literature
geography


english literature
pyschology
geography
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Ruthie2267
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(Original post by TheAlchemistress)
what would you think of these combinations?

fine-art
english literature
geography


english literature
pyschology
geography
What degree do you want to apply for? :P
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TheAlchemistress
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(Original post by Ruthie2267)
What degree do you want to apply for? :P
English literature and graphic design.
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username1150460
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(Original post by Ruthie2267)
I think there is still a perception that certain more 'academic' subjects are superior in terms of university applications - the so-called facilitating subjects (see page 26 onwards: http://russellgroup.ac.uk/media/5457...oices-2016.pdf).

I wouldn't say your examples are non-traditional as such, but neither would I (and I don't think many would yet) class them as facilitating. That's not to say they aren't 'proper' subjects, or that they're 'soft' or anything silly, just that in terms of uni applications they're not core unlike History, Maths, Sciences etc etc.

HOWEVER, saying that, sensible A Level combinations depend entirely on what you'll be applying for. If you apply for Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Cambridge, doing Psychology and Sociology might benefit you (although according to Trinity at least you're not required to have anything: https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/undergrad...-combinations/). And if you want to go into a certain career then you obviously have to choose things related to that (see: https://www.cife.org.uk/article/choo...evel-subjects/)

Tl;dr: if you're looking at Oxbridge then I wouldn't say your examples are 'traditional'. Choosing two facilitating subjects is a good bet (although I know people who only did one and got an offer) and then the third is up to you. But ABOVE ALL choose things you enjoy!! There is no point whatsoever in forcing yourself to do subjects you deem as better for oxbridge if you're going to hate them and therefore probably do less well

(PS sorry ik this is long winded but I hope it helped haha)
Okay yes, that makes a LOT of sense, thank you. xx

Do you know which subjects are considered facilitating? Like using that example Sociology might be 'traditional' enough for Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, but not for Law, even though something like Chemistry may not be 'facilitating' for Law but is 'traditional' enough for it to be taken seriously. Idk if that makes sense haha.
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Ruthie2267
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(Original post by TheAlchemistress)
English literature and graphic design.
I have to say I don't know much about graphic design requirements, but I feel like it'd be good to do an Art A Level? Firstly because it gives you an opportunity to develop a portfolio which I imagine a lot of unis will ask for? And secondly because it shows you actually like art and design aha, so on that basis (if you can't take a graphic design A Level), I'd say the first option. But defo go into college or school or whatever and see what they think!
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TheAlchemistress
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(Original post by Ruthie2267)
I have to say I don't know much about graphic design requirements, but I feel like it'd be good to do an Art A Level? Firstly because it gives you an opportunity to develop a portfolio which I imagine a lot of unis will ask for? And secondly because it shows you actually like art and design aha, so on that basis (if you can't take a graphic design A Level), I'd say the first option. But defo go into college or school or whatever and see what they think!
But for some reason I am struggling with a-level art.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by likezerogravity)
So a few years ago I was told that some subjects like Accounting, Psychology, and Law are non-traditional and not seen very well for uni admissions (especially Oxbridge). My understanding was that the traditional ones are basically the sciences, economics, literature, and history.

However, I just saw last week that these are now listed under LSE's list of traditional subjects... Now I'm just confused. Could someone please clarify this for me? xx And I would appreciate it if you could let me know the differences (if there are any in terms of perception!) for Oxbridge.
Accounting is listed as "non-preferred" by LSE.

Psychology and Law have long been acceptable, although they may be seen as slightly "softer" options and are only advisable if you're specifically considering but are not certain of whether you want to study one at university (and even then aren't a great indicator). For Law though, any academically rigorous subject combination is all that is required, and there are better subjects to prepare for that than Law, while for psychology some STEM background is more useful than taking Psychology itself.

Oxbridge do not currently publish a list themselves of preferred subjects, although individual colleges may. They just indicate that in general a rigorous academic preparation is expected, and "core" subjects such as History, English Lit (or the combined Lit/Lang), Geography, languages and STEM subjects are excellent preparation and normally are prerequisites for specific courses, and subjects like Economics, Philosophy, RS, the Classics suite, Law, Psychology, Politics and Sociology all provide good preparation, but are not direct requirements for any course. They normally advise students to select one or more from the first set to ensure they have enough preparation to apply to different courses if they find their interests change over the course of their studies (which is very common).

(Original post by TheAlchemistress)
what would you think of these combinations?

fine-art
english literature
geography


english literature
pyschology
geography
It's impossible to say without knowing what you may want to apply to. If you are considering applying to a creative arts course, the first is realistically the only option as the vast majority of art foundation years and similar will require Art at A-level or equivalent in some form. The latter would be adequate preparation for English literature, related humanities courses (e.g. the studies suite and non-language based Classics courses) and some less scientific Psychology and Geography courses. Maths would be more useful than Psychology in the latter set to broaden your options.

(Original post by Ruthie2267)
If you apply for Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Cambridge, doing Psychology and Sociology might benefit you
Maths would probably be more useful than either, and Biology perhaps more useful than both as well, although neither is required and taking either one would probably be sufficient to demonstrate a adequate scientific and quanitative background. I haven't seen any FOI stats on A-level choices for PBS, although I suspect applicants with a STEM subject probably are more successful on the whole. Psychology isn't required, and it's a moderately scientific course, although it's not necessary to take the more neuroscience themed papers, some quantitative and experimental methods and statistics content is part of the core course.
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TheAlchemistress
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artful_lounger

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4963748
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(Original post by artful_lounger)

Maths would probably be more useful than either, and Biology perhaps more useful than both as well, although neither is required and taking either one would probably be sufficient to demonstrate a adequate scientific and quanitative background. I haven't seen any FOI stats on A-level choices for PBS, although I suspect applicants with a STEM subject probably are more successful on the whole. Psychology isn't required, and it's a moderately scientific course, although it's not necessary to take the more neuroscience themed papers, some quantitative and experimental methods and statistics content is part of the core course.
Oh yes I definitely agree; in fact I'd argue that Maths would be looked upon more favourably than Biology due to the higher focus on stats etc. I went on a summer school at Oxford and they told my class that Maths (especially Statistics) was desirable for Psychology

I'm trying to find any FOI requests on it now! I remember seeing a History one a while back, and Google is giving me a Geography one, but no PBS as of yet

My point above was that, in addition to taking subjects such as Bio/Maths, taking a human science subject could help in that it shows you have passion for the subject etc. - although it is obviously not required!
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999tigger
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(Original post by likezerogravity)
So a few years ago I was told that some subjects like Accounting, Psychology, and Law are non-traditional and not seen very well for uni admissions (especially Oxbridge). My understanding was that the traditional ones are basically the sciences, economics, literature, and history.

However, I just saw last week that these are now listed under LSE's list of traditional subjects... Now I'm just confused. Could someone please clarify this for me? xx And I would appreciate it if you could let me know the differences (if there are any in terms of perception!) for Oxbridge.
Be careful who you listen to.

Always read the entrance requirements and make sue you comply with that.

Facilitating subjects are safe bets.

Unis may have additional preferred subjects, non preferred or some unis may have no preference. There are a few which get excluded such as general studies, critical thinking and citizenship.

Just do your research.
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Ruthie2267
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(Original post by likezerogravity)
Okay yes, that makes a LOT of sense, thank you. xx

Do you know which subjects are considered facilitating? Like using that example Sociology might be 'traditional' enough for Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, but not for Law, even though something like Chemistry may not be 'facilitating' for Law but is 'traditional' enough for it to be taken seriously. Idk if that makes sense haha.
The Kings College website has a pretty good overview of facilitating subjects!

http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/study/und...-subjects.html

I think a lot of it is common sense at the end of the day - if the subject you're thinking of relates to your chosen degree pathway in some way - whether through methodology (artful lounger pointed out that taking Biology can prepare you for the methods used in Psychology, for example) or through content - it's probably facilitating.
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salviakasana03
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(Original post by TheAlchemistress)
what would you think of these combinations?

fine-art
english literature
geography


english literature
pyschology
geography
can you tell me if my subject choices fit the Oxbridge or other top uni profiles?
I have history, English, political science, entrepreneurship, music and fine arts
are these too soft for law?
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