Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    is a disability curable? if so, give an example
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    is a disability curable? if so, give an example
    Can you be more specific please? I've been told mine aren't due to the damage I have.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    is a disability curable? if so, give an example
    That's a very open ended question, for something to be considered a disability it generally has to be quite long term.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Might as well ask if a piece of string is long.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Depends on what disability you're talking about. But as Claireestelle said, disabilities have to be long-term for the most part.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    That's a very open ended question, for something to be considered a disability it generally has to be quite long term.
    well, I can't really specify further because it is meant to be open ended. what do you define a disability to be? is it long term or short term? and can it be cured?
    I just want get different opinions. what do you think?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pathway)
    Depends on what disability you're talking about. But as Claireestelle said, disabilities have to be long-term for the most part.
    well what do you define a disability to be?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    well what do you define a disability to be?
    A long term health problem. So by definition, the answer is no. Yes, I've managed (or so they think) to grow out of the disabilities I had as a child. But that isn't true for most people.
    • Political Ambassador
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    Welcome Squad
    Short answer no. Long answer, no but for some disabilities it can be improved. For example extreme cases of autism can be subdued with correct upbringing and proper environment.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    well, I can't really specify further because it is meant to be open ended. what do you define a disability to be? is it long term or short term? and can it be cured?
    I just want get different opinions. what do you think?
    Something long term that has a substantial impact on someones daily life, i don't think disabilities can be cured just managed really well to the point where symptoms could be very manageable.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    well what do you define a disability to be?
    Well, I'm disabled, but my disability isn't curable and I will have it for the rest of my life (I've had it since birth).

    But technically speaking if you break your leg you're not able bodied like you may have been before breaking it, but a broken leg is usually temporary and recovery can make you able-bodied like you were before so that is "curable". Having said that, you wouldn't necessarily be defined legally as disabled. It needs to be long-term for it to be legally defined as a disability and have a substantial impact on your everyday life.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pathway)
    Well, I'm disabled, but my disability isn't curable and I will have it for the rest of my life (I've had it since birth).

    But technically speaking if you break your leg you're not able bodied like you may have been before breaking it, but a broken leg is usually temporary and recovery can make you able-bodied like you were before so that is "curable". Having said that, you wouldn't necessarily be defined legally as disabled. It needs to be long-term for it to be legally defined as a disability and have a substantial impact on your everyday life.
    but is a broken leg a disability?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    but is a broken leg a disability?
    According to the law, it's not.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    but is a broken leg a disability?
    Not legally, no. It's not long-term enough for it to be a disability.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Long-term is legally defined for the impairment to last at least twelve months, or be life-long.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pathway)
    Not legally, no. It's not long-term enough for it to be a disability.
    exactly. Personally, I don't consider it a disability but some people would
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    is a disability curable? if so, give an example
    The definition I go for with disability is something long term that limits a person (that's also loosely what the gov definition is). That usually means something permanent that may be able to be managed, but not cured, but in some cases it could be something curable too.
    Things like cancer for instance I would class as a disability (they limit the person and are long term), even though they can be curable in at least some cases.
    When a condition is cured it would stop being a disability, but up until then and including if it's managed, but not cured, it's a disability.

    By long term we're looking at months to forever. Essentially anything longer than you would go on holiday for.
    By limit we're talking anything that gets in the way of how somebody is reasonably expected to live.

    So let's look at broken legs: Do they limit a person? Yes. Are they long term? Not unless there's complications of some sort or it's a very serious break. You could heal a broken leg before mum gets home from a long holiday or before you get back from half term.
    So is a broken leg a disability? Nope.

    Now for damaged eyesight: Does it limit a person? Yes, but when it can be easily corrected by glasses it's still within that reasonable mark. If it's not easily corrected then absolute yes. Is it long term? Yes.
    Is damaged eyesight a disability? If not easily corrected then yes.

    Now for something like cancer: Is it limiting? Yes- lowers energy, messes with eating, etc etc etc. Is it long term? Yes, even though it may be curable at some point it will last for months. It's not something that will go away over half term.
    Is cancer disability? Yes.

    That's only a brief look and there are some cases that are more complicated than others (especially when you're looking more legally than socially), but I hope that helps give a basic idea.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
    Bizarre things students have spent their loans onThings you should budget for at uni

    Sponsored features:

    Making money from your own website

    Need some cash?

    How to make money running your own website.

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.