username2766878
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In 1994 between April and July, anywhere between half a million to one million Tutsi Rwandans perished in horrific episodes of primitive violence. The world stood by and did absolutely nothing. The then US administration led by Bill Clinton did all it could to downplay what was happening, with administration spokespersons even saying there were "acts of genocide" rather than genocide full stop. I hope I am wrong, but I fear that the same is happening today and we are missing the opportunity to stop it.

Like in Rwanda, the signs of genocide and ethnic persecution are equally present in Myanmar. There is an unprecedented mass movement of people, media access to the Rakhine state is restricted and there are masses giving witness testimony that Burmese security forces are carrying out atrocities. The Burmese authorities have restricted UN aid delivery to villages reportedly being torched and set alight.

The Rohingya, a predominantly Muslim ethnic minority in Burma, have long been despised by the Burmese state. Despite living in Burma for centuries, the Rohingya are seen by the Burmese government as illegal Bengali immigrants. As such, the Rohingya are stateless and defenceless. Even the neighbouring Bangladeshi government is hesitant to take in Rohingya refugees (despite the Rohingya speaking one dialect of the Bengali language). For Buddhist nationalists, the Rohingya are seen as a thorn to their vision of a purely Buddhist nation. Both contextual and contemporary evidence suggests genocide.

Using counter-terrorism as an excuse, the Burmese armed forces are systematically wiping out the Rohingya. There will inevitably be those, who out of their prejudice towards Muslims and or criticisms of Islam (the latter which is fine so long as it doesn't cloud your judgement on this), who try to "both sides" the conflict. It is true that a very tiny minority of Rohingya have taken up arms and attacked some Burmese security forces, but the scale of these small attacks (motivated by self defense rather than radical Islamism) is nothing in comparison to an exodus of hundreds of thousands of people across the border. Ask yourselves, why would so many poor people with nothing to their names up and flee the only homes they've ever known if something wasn't happening?

Worst of all is the fact that Aung San Suu Kyi, supposed champion of democracy and Nobel peace prize winner, acts as an apologist for Rohingya persecution to perhaps placate the powerful Burmese military establishment which ruled Burma for decades before her or perhaps for political popularity amongst Buddhist nationalists. The point is, the Rohingya, like the Tutsis, have no voice to speak for them.

Persecution is persecution, regardless of the victim's ethnicity or religious background. Myanmar may not be a nation of strategic or geopolitical interest, but our response to the events happening on the ground there will test our notion of humanity.
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shawn_o1
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I'm sure the genocide could have been stopped earlier, I saw the signs of it as early as 2015. Now the Burmese decide they can ramp it up and the world, distracted by the NK crisis, wouldn't care. Now didn't the Rwanda genocide also get overshadowed by NK missile tests?
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anarchism101
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
I'm sure the genocide could have been stopped earlier, I saw the signs of it as early as 2015. Now the Burmese decide they can ramp it up and the world, distracted by the NK crisis, wouldn't care. Now didn't the Rwanda genocide also get overshadowed by NK missile tests?
Possibly, but Rwanda was also overshadowed by the South African elections, and in particular the simultaneous genocide in Bosnia, which got more media attention.
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