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Petition: Support for male victims of domestic violence Watch

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    Reports have showed that men face over 30% of all domestic violence in the uk but there are only 18 refuges for men (none in London), this is unacceptable and shows that men’s issues are ignored by parliament. Consequently we believe that the government should Commit to help fund charities combat this as well as amending the Violence against women and girls policy to include men and boys as they matter as well.

    This issue is not going away it is getting worse with an increase of 80% rise in reports of domestic violence against men with studies showing that men are less likely to report it anyway, a study in Canada suggested that men may actually be more likely to suffer domestic violence.

    When £80m can be found to combat violence against women and girls but charities to help male victims have to shutdown helplines because they can not raise £45,000 something needs to be done.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...-a7626741.html
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/180286...n-past-decade/
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/think...t-great-taboo/
    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-...303/01-eng.htm
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    Reports have showed that men face over 30% of all domestic violence in the uk but there are only 18 refuges for men (none in London), this is unacceptable and shows that men’s issues are ignored by parliament. Consequently we believe that the government should Commit to help fund charities combat this as well as amending the Violence against women and girls policy to include men and boys as they matter as well.

    This issue is not going away it is getting worse with an increase of 80% rise in reports of domestic violence against men with studies showing that men are less likely to report it anyway, a study in Canada suggested that men may actually be more likely to suffer domestic violence.

    When £80m can be found to combat violence against women and girls but charities to help male victims have to shutdown helplines because they can not raise £45,000 something needs to be done.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...-a7626741.html
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/180286...n-past-decade/
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/think...t-great-taboo/
    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-...303/01-eng.htm
    It's a couple of years old, but this article remains a brilliant explanation of why the widely-spread statistic that around 1 in 3 domestic violence victims are male is misleading and unhelpful. Men are considerably more likely to commit abuse, that abuse is far more likely to be of the most serious varieties, and when they are the victims they are far more likely to be taken seriously.

    We absolutely need to tackle all forms of domestic abuse, but we have to start from a position of acknowledging the facts - this is still, absolutely, a gendered issue. Women are overwhelmingly the victims, we are less likely to be able to fend for ourselves in a physical confrontation, and there is a widespread culture of believing we are likely to make up or exaggerate claims. This likely stems somewhat from biology, with testosterone promoting aggression, and somewhat from cultures which continue to promote the idea of men taking a dominant role in relationships. To this end, we need to continue and defend specific policy on countering violence against women and girls - the context of the violence they face is different and therefore so are the best approaches to dealing with it.

    That being said, the lack of support for male victims is indeed disgraceful and I would absolutely support more funding for male-accessible services as well as staff training and research. With a continuing increase in the number of male same-sex relationships this issue is only likely to grow should we refuse to tackle it.

    What I would be interested in exploring too, strictly on a trial basis and with guaranteed access to existing services for all who want it, is gender-neutral refuge centres. I suspect that some, perhaps many, would appreciate the opportunity to re-integrate with the offending sex following abuse - after all, they can't be avoided forever and contact in a safe, controlled and supportive environment seems a promising way to handle this. This would additionally allow for new approaches to treatment to be trialled. There would also be benefits for transgender, non-binary, primarily heterosocial and other people who will often much prefer a non-gendered provision, to the extent that they may hesitate to access gendered services - particularly pertinent given the heightened levels of abuse suffered by the queer community.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's a couple of years old, but this article remains a brilliant explanation of why the widely-spread statistic that around 1 in 3 domestic violence victims are male is misleading and unhelpful. Men are considerably more likely to commit abuse, that abuse is far more likely to be of the most serious varieties, and when they are the victims they are far more likely to be taken seriously.

    We absolutely need to tackle all forms of domestic abuse, but we have to start from a position of acknowledging the facts - this is still, absolutely, a gendered issue. Women are overwhelmingly the victims, we are less likely to be able to fend for ourselves in a physical confrontation, and there is a widespread culture of believing we are likely to make up or exaggerate claims. This likely stems somewhat from biology, with testosterone promoting aggression, and somewhat from cultures which continue to promote the idea of men taking a dominant role in relationships. To this end, we need to continue and defend specific policy on countering violence against women and girls - the context of the violence they face is different and therefore so are the best approaches to dealing with it.
    Should the Axis states have been excluded from the Marshall plan?
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's a couple of years old, but this article remains a brilliant explanation of why the widely-spread statistic that around 1 in 3 domestic violence victims are male is misleading and unhelpful. Men are considerably more likely to commit abuse, that abuse is far more likely to be of the most serious varieties, and when they are the victims they are far more likely to be taken seriously.

    We absolutely need to tackle all forms of domestic abuse, but we have to start from a position of acknowledging the facts - this is still, absolutely, a gendered issue. Women are overwhelmingly the victims, we are less likely to be able to fend for ourselves in a physical confrontation, and there is a widespread culture of believing we are likely to make up or exaggerate claims. This likely stems somewhat from biology, with testosterone promoting aggression, and somewhat from cultures which continue to promote the idea of men taking a dominant role in relationships. To this end, we need to continue and defend specific policy on countering violence against women and girls - the context of the violence they face is different and therefore so are the best approaches to dealing with it.

    That being said, the lack of support for male victims is indeed disgraceful and I would absolutely support more funding for male-accessible services as well as staff training and research. With a continuing increase in the number of male same-sex relationships this issue is only likely to grow should we refuse to tackle it.

    What I would be interested in exploring too, strictly on a trial basis and with guaranteed access to existing services for all who want it, is gender-neutral refuge centres. I suspect that some, perhaps many, would appreciate the opportunity to re-integrate with the offending sex following abuse - after all, they can't be avoided forever and contact in a safe, controlled and supportive environment seems a promising way to handle this. This would additionally allow for new approaches to treatment to be trialled. There would also be benefits for transgender, non-binary, primarily heterosocial and other people who will often much prefer a non-gendered provision, to the extent that they may hesitate to access gendered services - particularly pertinent given the heightened levels of abuse suffered by the queer community.
    So you don’t deny that 1 in 3 males are victims you just try to downplay it so you can ignore it.

    I would like to point out a quote from people researching this and the existence of a male victim.
    He said: 'In the latest incident I made the initial complaint to police as my wife assaulted me. But when they arrived, they showed little concern and instead arrested me because my wife made a counter allegation. I certainly feel that more compassion and empathy needs to be shown towards male victims of domestic violence.'


    Within my research, the predominant experience is of men being arrested under false charges and their disclosures of being the victim are not taken seriously, despite having evidence.

    When people like you downplay the abuse men face it is not a surprise the police don’t take it serious and charge women because as you says men are abusers.
    https://www.tees.ac.uk/sections/news...?story_id=6028
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    Absolutely agree, still a stigma that the wife "cannot" abuse the husband. Male domestic abuse is also unreported so funding for male domestic violence support should be created.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's a couple of years old, but this article remains a brilliant explanation of why the widely-spread statistic that around 1 in 3 domestic violence victims are male is misleading and unhelpful. Men are considerably more likely to commit abuse, that abuse is far more likely to be of the most serious varieties, and when they are the victims they are far more likely to be taken seriously.

    We absolutely need to tackle all forms of domestic abuse, but we have to start from a position of acknowledging the facts - this is still, absolutely, a gendered issue. Women are overwhelmingly the victims, we are less likely to be able to fend for ourselves in a physical confrontation, and there is a widespread culture of believing we are likely to make up or exaggerate claims. This likely stems somewhat from biology, with testosterone promoting aggression, and somewhat from cultures which continue to promote the idea of men taking a dominant role in relationships. To this end, we need to continue and defend specific policy on countering violence against women and girls - the context of the violence they face is different and therefore so are the best approaches to dealing with it.

    That being said, the lack of support for male victims is indeed disgraceful and I would absolutely support more funding for male-accessible services as well as staff training and research. With a continuing increase in the number of male same-sex relationships this issue is only likely to grow should we refuse to tackle it.

    What I would be interested in exploring too, strictly on a trial basis and with guaranteed access to existing services for all who want it, is gender-neutral refuge centres. I suspect that some, perhaps many, would appreciate the opportunity to re-integrate with the offending sex following abuse - after all, they can't be avoided forever and contact in a safe, controlled and supportive environment seems a promising way to handle this. This would additionally allow for new approaches to treatment to be trialled. There would also be benefits for transgender, non-binary, primarily heterosocial and other people who will often much prefer a non-gendered provision, to the extent that they may hesitate to access gendered services - particularly pertinent given the heightened levels of abuse suffered by the queer community.
    Nice gender equality there Saoirse.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's a couple of years old, but this article remains a brilliant explanation of why the widely-spread statistic that around 1 in 3 domestic violence victims are male is misleading and unhelpful. Men are considerably more likely to commit abuse, that abuse is far more likely to be of the most serious varieties, and when they are the victims they are far more likely to be taken seriously.

    We absolutely need to tackle all forms of domestic abuse, but we have to start from a position of acknowledging the facts - this is still, absolutely, a gendered issue. Women are overwhelmingly the victims, we are less likely to be able to fend for ourselves in a physical confrontation, and there is a widespread culture of believing we are likely to make up or exaggerate claims. This likely stems somewhat from biology, with testosterone promoting aggression, and somewhat from cultures which continue to promote the idea of men taking a dominant role in relationships. To this end, we need to continue and defend specific policy on countering violence against women and girls - the context of the violence they face is different and therefore so are the best approaches to dealing with it.

    That being said, the lack of support for male victims is indeed disgraceful and I would absolutely support more funding for male-accessible services as well as staff training and research. With a continuing increase in the number of male same-sex relationships this issue is only likely to grow should we refuse to tackle it.

    What I would be interested in exploring too, strictly on a trial basis and with guaranteed access to existing services for all who want it, is gender-neutral refuge centres. I suspect that some, perhaps many, would appreciate the opportunity to re-integrate with the offending sex following abuse - after all, they can't be avoided forever and contact in a safe, controlled and supportive environment seems a promising way to handle this. This would additionally allow for new approaches to treatment to be trialled. There would also be benefits for transgender, non-binary, primarily heterosocial and other people who will often much prefer a non-gendered provision, to the extent that they may hesitate to access gendered services - particularly pertinent given the heightened levels of abuse suffered by the queer community.
    Absolutely no evidence for this, or any of what you're saying tbh. Have you not considered that men reporting domestic abuse committed upon them by females doesn't always happen, because of a sense of embarrassment or shame on the part of the male?
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Absolutely no evidence for this, or any of what you're saying tbh. Have you not considered that men reporting domestic abuse committed upon them by females doesn't always happen, because of a sense of embarrassment or shame on the part of the male?
    Studies into this suggests the bold is true
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    Joe is a #FakeLibertarian
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    Now on to serious matters. I agree with this statement and more needs to be done to help male victims. #meminist
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    (Original post by mr T 999)
    Now on to serious matters. I agree with this statement and more needs to be done to help male victims. #meminist
    You do know that meninist was a parody right?
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    Bro if your wife can even have the strength to beat you up you're not the husband. She is

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    I'm joking
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    Trying to tell us something joecphillips?

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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's a couple of years old, but this article remains a brilliant explanation of why the widely-spread statistic that around 1 in 3 domestic violence victims are male is misleading and unhelpful. Men are considerably more likely to commit abuse, that abuse is far more likely to be of the most serious varieties, and when they are the victims they are far more likely to be taken seriously.

    We absolutely need to tackle all forms of domestic abuse, but we have to start from a position of acknowledging the facts - this is still, absolutely, a gendered issue. Women are overwhelmingly the victims, we are less likely to be able to fend for ourselves in a physical confrontation, and there is a widespread culture of believing we are likely to make up or exaggerate claims. This likely stems somewhat from biology, with testosterone promoting aggression, and somewhat from cultures which continue to promote the idea of men taking a dominant role in relationships. To this end, we need to continue and defend specific policy on countering violence against women and girls - the context of the violence they face is different and therefore so are the best approaches to dealing with it.

    That being said, the lack of support for male victims is indeed disgraceful and I would absolutely support more funding for male-accessible services as well as staff training and research. With a continuing increase in the number of male same-sex relationships this issue is only likely to grow should we refuse to tackle it.

    What I would be interested in exploring too, strictly on a trial basis and with guaranteed access to existing services for all who want it, is gender-neutral refuge centres. I suspect that some, perhaps many, would appreciate the opportunity to re-integrate with the offending sex following abuse - after all, they can't be avoided forever and contact in a safe, controlled and supportive environment seems a promising way to handle this. This would additionally allow for new approaches to treatment to be trialled. There would also be benefits for transgender, non-binary, primarily heterosocial and other people who will often much prefer a non-gendered provision, to the extent that they may hesitate to access gendered services - particularly pertinent given the heightened levels of abuse suffered by the queer community.
    Yeah plus all the females who commit domestic abuse are ****ing lesbos
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    You do know that meninist was a parody right?
    Does not matter if it's a parody or not what matters is men lives matters.
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    So you don’t deny that 1 in 3 males are victims you just try to downplay it so you can ignore it.

    I would like to point out a quote from people researching this and the existence of a male victim.
    He said: 'In the latest incident I made the initial complaint to police as my wife assaulted me. But when they arrived, they showed little concern and instead arrested me because my wife made a counter allegation. I certainly feel that more compassion and empathy needs to be shown towards male victims of domestic violence.'


    Within my research, the predominant experience is of men being arrested under false charges and their disclosures of being the victim are not taken seriously, despite having evidence.

    When people like you downplay the abuse men face it is not a surprise the police don’t take it serious and charge women because as you says men are abusers.
    https://www.tees.ac.uk/sections/news...?story_id=6028
    It's a case of lies, damned lies and statistics but no, I don't accept the "1 in 3" figure. Those crime surveys are the same things that give you the ludicrous rape/sexual assault statistics which make it look like half the women going to uni in this country get raped along the way. The questions include things related to general "abuse" and "conflict", which while obviously unpleasant are not always crimes nor leave people in need of refuges. Given the similar ratio police reports, prosecutions, homicide rates, and repeated or severe abuse which is more likely to be reported, the 1-in-5 estimate appears much more plausible. That's still a problem of course, but we need to be honest about the scale of it before we tackle it.

    Michael Kimmel (2002) is one who's looked into this and reached the conclusion that the idea of men being less likely to report and less likely to be listened to is incorrect. I'd be interested in seeing any non-anecdotal evidence you have of them being less likely to report specific crimes or less likely to see the perpetrators arrested, charged or convicted?

    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Absolutely no evidence for this, or any of what you're saying tbh. Have you not considered that men reporting domestic abuse committed upon them by females doesn't always happen, because of a sense of embarrassment or shame on the part of the male?
    So apart from there being more men committing abuse according to self-reporting, police reports, arrests, convictions, and a multitude of academics, there's "absolutely no evidence?". I do understand the theory that men can be shamed out of reporting, but I've yet to see anything to suggest this phenomenon affects them more than women - who may also not report due to feeling that they were responsible for not staying away, or for engaging in an argument.

    (Original post by joecphillips)
    Studies into this suggests the bold is true
    Which studies?

    (Original post by Connor27)
    Nice gender equality there Saoirse.
    How are we ever going to have gender equality if we can't have a sensible and informed discussion about what inequality there actually is?

    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Absolutely agree, still a stigma that the wife "cannot" abuse the husband. Male domestic abuse is also unreported so funding for male domestic violence support should be created.
    The one thing I'd question is whether the demand's actually there for traditional shelters. Certainly we need enough for them to be geographically available, make sure there's one in London for instance. But of those that do exist, are they turning men away due to lack of space? If not, I think we need to consider alternative ways to offer support to these victims - I doubt this is a case of "If you build it, they will come".
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    So apart from there being more men committing abuse according to self-reporting, police reports, arrests, convictions, and a multitude of academics, there's "absolutely no evidence?". I do understand the theory that men can be shamed out of reporting, but I've yet to see anything to suggest this phenomenon affects them more than women - who may also not report due to feeling that they were responsible for not staying away, or for engaging in an argument.
    Statistically, 1 in 3 reports of domestic abuse are male victims. So with the theory of men being ashamed out of reporting, that suggests that the 1 in 3 figure likely doesn't tell the full tale and it may be closer to 1 in 2 being male, no? The phenomenon comes from it being emasculating to report that a man is being victimised and bullied by a woman, so it's of course going to affect men more than women. Men can also not report due to the reasons you stated women may not report. There's also absolutely no evidence to suggest that abuse by men is typically more severe in nature than that of women.
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Statistically, 1 in 3 reports of domestic abuse are male victims. So with the theory of men being ashamed out of reporting, that suggests that the 1 in 3 figure likely doesn't tell the full tale and it may be closer to 1 in 2 being male, no? The phenomenon comes from it being emasculating to report that a man is being victimised and bullied by a woman, so it's of course going to affect men more than women. Men can also not report due to the reasons you stated women may not report. There's also absolutely no evidence to suggest that abuse by men is typically more severe in nature than that of women.
    Again, just not true. 1 in 3 reports of domestic abuse, or violence, or conflict, excluding sexual abuse or violence, in a survey, are from males. That is very different to 1 in 3 reports in general when for instance reports to police are at 1 in 5 instead. And that theory, while it does make some sense, is as far as I can see just a theory - I've yet to be presented with any evidence of its effect in practice, but I'd love to read it if I were.

    As for abuse by men being typically more severe: men are more likely to kill their partners, more likely to abuse multiple times, and more likely to be given custodial sentences for violent abuse. That seems a good proxy for 'seriousness', no?
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    It's a case of lies, damned lies and statistics but no, I don't accept the "1 in 3" figure. Those crime surveys are the same things that give you the ludicrous rape/sexual assault statistics which make it look like half the women going to uni in this country get raped along the way. The questions include things related to general "abuse" and "conflict", which while obviously unpleasant are not always crimes nor leave people in need of refuges. Given the similar ratio police reports, prosecutions, homicide rates, and repeated or severe abuse which is more likely to be reported, the 1-in-5 estimate appears much more plausible. That's still a problem of course, but we need to be honest about the scale of it before we tackle it.

    Michael Kimmel (2002) is one who's looked into this and reached the conclusion that the idea of men being less likely to report and less likely to be listened to is incorrect. I'd be interested in seeing any non-anecdotal evidence you have of them being less likely to report specific crimes or less likely to see the perpetrators arrested, charged or convicted?



    So apart from there being more men committing abuse according to self-reporting, police reports, arrests, convictions, and a multitude of academics, there's "absolutely no evidence?". I do understand the theory that men can be shamed out of reporting, but I've yet to see anything to suggest this phenomenon affects them more than women - who may also not report due to feeling that they were responsible for not staying away, or for engaging in an argument.



    Which studies?



    How are we ever going to have gender equality if we can't have a sensible and informed discussion about what inequality there actually is?



    The one thing I'd question is whether the demand's actually there for traditional shelters. Certainly we need enough for them to be geographically available, make sure there's one in London for instance. But of those that do exist, are they turning men away due to lack of space? If not, I think we need to consider alternative ways to offer support to these victims - I doubt this is a case of "If you build it, they will come".
    Will the ons do? Table 4.28
    https://www.ons.gov.uk/file?uri=/peo...cm77432777.xls
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    Again, just not true. 1 in 3 reports of domestic abuse, or violence, or conflict, excluding sexual abuse or violence, in a survey, are from males. That is very different to 1 in 3 reports in general when for instance reports to police are at 1 in 5 instead. And that theory, while it does make some sense, is as far as I can see just a theory - I've yet to be presented with any evidence of its effect in practice, but I'd love to read it if I were.

    As for abuse by men being typically more severe: men are more likely to kill their partners, more likely to abuse multiple times, and more likely to be given custodial sentences for violent abuse. That seems a good proxy for 'seriousness', no?
    So if statistics for actual police reports by males are fewer than surveys, does that not give a hint that maybe there's something to the whole theory? Also, a crime has to actually be reported for a conviction to be made, so of course more males are going to be arrested and charged.
 
 
 
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