Kicked out of uni for failing first year - What are my options? I have good A levels. Watch

RandoAccount
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hey everyone, so in my A levels I got A*A*B in compsci / bio / maths. I got into a very good uni (top 5) to study computer science. I coasted through most of my AS and A2 year and still managed to do well by just studying a few days before my exams and still getting a high UMS, and basically doing very little work throughout the year.

But I guess it instilled absolutely shoddy study habits and I went into uni with the same attitude. I coasted through the first semester and did really well but the second semester kicked me in the arse. Failed most of the summer finals and messed up the retakes too because I'm a procrastinating mug. My uni has given me an academic fail with no way of returning next year, which I honestly fully deserve for being such an idiot.

I'm at a loss for what to do now.

I'm having second thoughts about even continuing with computer science. I excelled in it without really trying all throughout school (95+ in GCSEs / A2s) so it seemed the most logical choice, but I don't really have a drive to pursue it on an extra curricular basis.

And I have a confession to make - part of the reason I barely studied compsci was because I spent a big portion of my spare time (and I had a lot of spare time since I wasn't studying my course a lot) studying physics. It was just A2 level stuff but I found it so interesting that I'd procrastinate studying compsci to do physics / reading up on different concepts I never did because I dropped it after GCSE. It sounds ridiculous, I know.

I really want to transition to engineering, but I feel this is impossible considering I don't have a physics A level. I can take an extra year out to do an A level or two (Physics and try to get an A* in Maths) but I don't know if unis would even care considering I wouldn't get a predicted grade since I'm not enrolled in sixth form atm.

Is my only option to continue compsci at another institution using my year old A level grades? I know it's far too late for UCAS so whatever it is, it'll have to be in 2018.

Either way, I think I may take a year out and work a regular job to instill some discipline in myself. And think long and hard about all the money I've wasted and try to reimburse my parents for being such a dolt.

Thanks for reading the post, and I hope anyone can offer some advice. I'm feeling awfully lonely at the moment - all of my mates are busy with second year and I can't turn to teachers for advice.
2
reply
Nallsacks
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Damn. You sound like a tard. :adore:
2
reply
RandoAccount
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Nallsacks)
Damn. You sound like a tard. :adore:
I am. But I'd also appreciate some advice.

0
reply
Den987
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by RandoAccount)
Hey everyone, so in my A levels I got A*A*B in compsci / bio / maths. I got into a very good uni (top 5) to study computer science. I coasted through most of my AS and A2 year and still managed to do well by just studying a few days before my exams and still getting a high UMS, and basically doing very little work throughout the year.

But I guess it instilled absolutely shoddy study habits and I went into uni with the same attitude. I coasted through the first semester and did really well but the second semester kicked me in the arse. Failed most of the summer finals and messed up the retakes too because I'm a procrastinating mug. My uni has given me an academic fail with no way of returning next year, which I honestly fully deserve for being such an idiot.

I'm at a loss for what to do now.

I'm having second thoughts about even continuing with computer science. I excelled in it without really trying all throughout school (95+ in GCSEs / A2s) so it seemed the most logical choice, but I don't really have a drive to pursue it on an extra curricular basis.

And I have a confession to make - part of the reason I barely studied compsci was because I spent a big portion of my spare time (and I had a lot of spare time since I wasn't studying my course a lot) studying physics. It was just A2 level stuff but I found it so interesting that I'd procrastinate studying compsci to do physics / reading up on different concepts I never did because I dropped it after GCSE. It sounds ridiculous, I know.

I really want to transition to engineering, but I feel this is impossible considering I don't have a physics A level. I can take an extra year out to do an A level or two (Physics and try to get an A* in Maths) but I don't know if unis would even care considering I wouldn't get a predicted grade since I'm not enrolled in sixth form atm.

Is my only option to continue compsci at another institution using my year old A level grades? I know it's far too late for UCAS so whatever it is, it'll have to be in 2018.

Either way, I think I may take a year out and work a regular job to instill some discipline in myself. And think long and hard about all the money I've wasted and try to reimburse my parents for being such a dolt.

Thanks for reading the post, and I hope anyone can offer some advice. I'm feeling awfully lonely at the moment - all of my mates are busy with second year and I can't turn to teachers for advice.
Just take a gap year and study the courses you want to take in 2018. In the meantime you can save up some money. No use doing a course you don't enjoy.
3
reply
The RAR
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
This is the pattern I am noticing:
Person A "Yeah I aced my SATs in year 6, gonna ace GCSEs as well!"
5 years later
Person A "OH ****! I ****ed up everything in my GCSEs"

Person B "Yeah man, I aced my GCSEs with As and A*s, gonna ace A levels now!"
2 years later
Person B " WTF? Why have I got such **** results?"

Person C "Yeah *****! I aced my A levels, going to Oxford now *****!"
1 year later
Person C "Oh man, I really thought I had this....."

People are simply overconfident of their past qualifications but I don't blame you OP, it just happens and the human brain can be lazy at times.
14
reply
RandoAccount
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by Den987)
Just take a gap year and study the courses you want to take in 2018. In the meantime you can save up some money. No use doing a course you don't enjoy.
Thanks, Den. Do you reckon I should take a Physics A level if I'm planning on applying for an engineering course?
0
reply
Emla93
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
Hey OP

Sorry to hear about your first year experience- I am a firm believer that things happen for a reason. This obviously highlights you do not have an interest in computer science and are destined to do something else.
I would suggest getting a part time job- and perhaps do a physics alevel fast fracked? Get a private tutor online? There's also loads of free teaching videos on YouTube if strapped for cash.
Or perhaps research properly into uni courses and see what you really feel passionate for and pursue it. If you really love something, you will excel!!

Good luck!!
3
reply
Den987
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by RandoAccount)
Thanks, Den. Do you reckon I should take a Physics A level if I'm planning on applying for an engineering course?
Yh you should. I'd also recommend maths since it will give you an advantage.
2
reply
RandoAccount
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Emla93)
Hey OP

Sorry to hear about your first year experience- I am a firm believer that things happen for a reason. This obviously highlights you do not have an interest in computer science and are destined to do something else.
I would suggest getting a part time job- and perhaps do a physics alevel fast fracked? Get a private tutor online? There's also loads of free teaching videos on YouTube if strapped for cash.
Or perhaps research properly into uni courses and see what you really feel passionate for and pursue it. If you really love something, you will excel!!

Good luck!!
Thanks Emla, that's cheered me up a bit. Yeah, I think a proper sit down and a mull over my options will do me a lot of good. I hope this is a lesson I'll carry with me for a long time.

(Original post by Den987)
Yh you should. I'd also recommend maths since it will give you an advantage.
Alright, sure. Has Maths changed its structure since 2016 when I did them? I know a lot of subjects like Bio merged into one big exam at the end of the year, do my modules still hold any weight? My AS modules and C3 were good so carrying those over would be a help.
0
reply
1Confused.child
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
Apprentieships? Since you're interested in Engineering you might want to look at that
1
reply
cheesecakelove
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
I would research engineering courses and their entry requirements first. If you need to study extra courses, take a year out to do so first. At the same time, try to use your time constructively, e.g. Paid work, work experience or volunteering, as it will give you something to talk about in your interviews.

You are not restricted to studying computer science. You are entitled to study the things you are interested in! Just next time, don't make the same mistake, put your whole effort into your studies!
1
reply
Indigo&Violet
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
It sounds like you've learnt your lesson and had time to mature and think about what you really want to do. It might have been an expensive mistake, but at least you've learnt from it.

If you do some searching you may find some engineering courses that will consider you without A level physics (there are some threads on here suggesting Manchester, Birmingham and Exeter, I'm sure you'll find more). Getting in without A level Physics and with a B in Maths might be more tricky, depending on how flexible you are willing to be with institution/reputation. Civil Engineering seems to be more flexible than others - UCL Civil take people without Physics or Maths.

Maths has now changed to a linear subject, but you might still be able to resit one or two legacy modules since there is normally a grace year to allow resits. If resits aren't possible, lots of unis take Further Maths in place of Maths so you could do that this year. Physics is reformed and you might find harder to study independently - you will struggle to pass the practical component without a school to support you

I understand being kicked out was probably a bit of a shock, but you are a bit late in the academic year to start new courses now. Here are a few urgent questions you need to ask yourself:

1) What sort of engineering do you want to do?
2) Once you've worked that out, google/email 10-20 universities to find out if you can get on to a course you want with your current qualifications.
3) If you need extra qualifications can you do them this year?
4) If you can't do them this year what can you do in the two years you need to have out (this year, plus a year to get quals, plus a year to apply). Engineering apprenticeships could be very useful - you'll be earning, you'll find out if you actually enjoy engineering and some unis may accept apprenticeship quals in place of A level Physics.

You could also look at foundation years. These would allow you just one year out now, but you need to check funding given you have already used up a year.

Lots of questions to ask yourself. Hopefully you'll have learnt from this year that it might be better to have two years out making sure you're on a course that suits you rather than rushing to take whatever you can get at the end of this year and feeling like you've made the wrong choice again.
4
reply
Den987
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by RandoAccount)
Thanks Emla, that's cheered me up a bit. Yeah, I think a proper sit down and a mull over my options will do me a lot of good. I hope this is a lesson I'll carry with me for a long time.



Alright, sure. Has Maths changed its structure since 2016 when I did them? I know a lot of subjects like Bio merged into one big exam at the end of the year, do my modules still hold any weight? My AS modules and C3 were good so carrying those over would be a help.
Not yet, you can still take the module exams until 2018, not sure but maybe 2019 as well. Then they will become linear too.
0
reply
Minerva
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by RandoAccount)
Thanks for reading the post, and I hope anyone can offer some advice. I'm feeling awfully lonely at the moment - all of my mates are busy with second year and I can't turn to teachers for advice.
I can't really improve upon what @Indigo&Violet has already said - excellent advice in there - except to say that there is no need to rush into anything. This will have been quite a blow to the confidence as well as the wallet, so you'd be much better off giving yourself some time to pick up the pieces and make better decisions as a result. Your post is full of insight, which will take you a long way.

It is worth remembering that there is nothing in the rule book that says you have to have completed your undergrad degree by the age of 21 or life will pass you by - it certainly won't, and much better to take some time to think through what you really want to do, even if it does take you a few years. The last thing you want to do is to rush in to another course and end up using up your student loan entitlement on something that really doesn't do it for you.

(Original post by Indigo&Violet)
Tagging doesn't seem to be working!
2
reply
JohanGRK
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by Mathemagicien)
This website is all about telling people that they can achieve the near impossible.
Sadly, this.
0
reply
Indigo&Violet
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by Minerva)
except to say that there is no need to rush into anything.
Minerva is of course right. If you think you might want to pick up a new qualification this year then yes, time it pressing, as we are approaching the last dates colleges etc might accept someone new onto a course. However, in the grand scheme of things, it's really not a problem if all you end up doing this year is having a bit more of a think and explore to make sure you've really got the right choice next year.

Good luck!
0
reply
RandoAccount
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by Indigo&Violet)
Minerva is of course right. If you think you might want to pick up a new qualification this year then yes, time it pressing, as we are approaching the last dates colleges etc might accept someone new onto a course. However, in the grand scheme of things, it's really not a problem if all you end up doing this year is having a bit more of a think and explore to make sure you've really got the right choice next year.

Good luck!
Sure, thanks. I was actually planning on doing the A level at home and just going to a centre to do my practical. I've basically got the next 8 months to do one A level qualification and retake one Maths module so I don't think sixth form would really be worth the money at this stage.

Do you think this is unwise? I mean, through school I always learned independently and only used teachers on a supplementary basis. I may just do one of those online courses + a tutor to get through the year while buckling down and studying all day.
0
reply
Rabbit2
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
I am looking at things from the other end of a career path. I hold a bachelors [1969] and a masters [1987] in electrical engineering. I have lived in 14 countries at customer expense. When i started, i felt an engineering degree was the optimum choice. Today, i think they are about equivalent. You can do engineering and/or write code with either. I write quite a bit of code. You need to know both the engineering part [for hardware fabrication], as well as the code part - to make the hardware play. With a physics degree, i think that you would probably have a hard time making a living in today's world. Physicists aren't too good at making things work [in my experience]. You need an engineer or software person for that. Preferably a little of both. As you go through the educational process, the 'deadwood' drops out. Everyone 'fakes' their way through 'school'. Many 'fake' their way through college. Some 'fake' their way through a bachelors degree [i know i did]. My 'faking' stopped in graduate school. At that point, i either had to figure out how to be a real student, or give up. Faking wouldn't cut it anymore. I learned how to predict exam questions, by keeping track of how long an instructor spent on each topic, and how much work they went to in covering it. This allowed me to predict what questions i would have to answer with amazing accuracy. When you only study what you are going to be asked, it makes studying much more efficient. The first time i did this, i hit the guy 100%. The next 8 times, yielded a 'worst case' return of 75% of the questions. I had several other 100% occurrences. In the 1950s and 1960s, i went to school with a dozen kids who regularly got A's, and appeared to never work. I later found that my closest competitor among them had an IQ 17 points under mine. THAT is how they were doing it. Of course, nobody is going to tell you this. They will just beat you up for not "applying yourself" - or some such eyewash. As you go through your degree program, the work becomes more difficult, and therefore more interesting. The REALLY interesting stuff occurs in graduate school. Good Luck!!
2
reply
Indigo&Violet
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by RandoAccount)
Sure, thanks. I was actually planning on doing the A level at home and just going to a centre to do my practical...

Do you think this is unwise?
I don't think it's unwise at all if that's how you learn well, but I do think you might struggle to find a centre (especially for the science practicals). If that's the plan and your old school haven't already agreed, I'd start looking now because it might take you a while to find one.
0
reply
Ellie_sb1
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
I would take a year out, have a regular job while studying physics and maybe even chemistry depending on the university. You have good grades overall so I wouldn't worry too much....just work hard and figure out which course you are really passionate about. Good luck 😊
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Durham University
    Pre-Application Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 20 Sep '19
  • Loughborough University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 20 Sep '19
  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 20 Sep '19

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (208)
23.64%
Pop (218)
24.77%
Jazz (33)
3.75%
Classical (49)
5.57%
Hip-Hop (169)
19.2%
Electronic (60)
6.82%
Indie (143)
16.25%

Watched Threads

View All