Are tuition fees too high?

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Poll: Are tuition fees too high?
Yes (33)
97.06%
No (1)
2.94%
They are about right (0)
0%
HarryGCSE
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi there, I am currently doing my EPQ which is about whether the costs of going to university outweigh the benefits. Im interested in finding out everyone's opinions from experience.

Here are some general questions to consider :

Are tuition fees too high? (Does the cost justify the degree, etc)
Is the maintenance loan enough to cover your expenses?
What do you think of the current system of getting a loan and having to pay it back?
Do you think going to university has any benefits?

Thanks for your time.
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EmmaRebecca1997
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#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by HarryGCSE)
Hi there, I am currently doing my EPQ which is about whether the costs of going to university outweigh the benefits. Im interested in finding out everyone's opinions from experience.

Here are some general questions to consider :

Are tuition fees too high? (Does the cost justify the degree, etc)
Is the maintenance loan enough to cover your expenses?
What do you think of the current system of getting a loan and having to pay it back?
Do you think going to university has any benefits?

Thanks for your time.
I find tuition fees are far too high because as an example, I do creative writing and media studies joint honours. Currently I have 8 contact hours a week. That's it. I basically have lectures where the lecturer talks off a slide. Yet I'm still paying the exact same price as my friend who does radiology and spends hours and hours a week in a lab doing practical work and who has access to lots of equipment. I don't see how it's justified that I pay the exact same as him when he gets far more out of his course than me.

The maintenance loan hardly covers anything. It pretty much covers rent and that's it. If you're coming to uni you still need either extra money from family or to get a job because maintenance hardly covers any of your living costs. Once rent goes out you're usually left with like £100 or less and that's to last you like three months.

The current system here is very good because you're not expected to pay it back until you're earning over £21k which means you're not having to worry about getting a high paid job the second you leave uni. It gives you time to get to where you need to be without being swamped in debt you can't afford.

Uni does have its benefits because in this day and age a lot of companies want a degree from their employee. A lot of the time they don't even care what the degree is, it's just to prove you've put the work in.
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HarryGCSE
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by EmmaRebecca1997)
I find tuition fees are far too high because as an example, I do creative writing and media studies joint honours. Currently I have 8 contact hours a week. That's it. I basically have lectures where the lecturer talks off a slide. Yet I'm still paying the exact same price as my friend who does radiology and spends hours and hours a week in a lab doing practical work and who has access to lots of equipment. I don't see how it's justified that I pay the exact same as him when he gets far more out of his course than me.

The maintenance loan hardly covers anything. It pretty much covers rent and that's it. If you're coming to uni you still need either extra money from family or to get a job because maintenance hardly covers any of your living costs. Once rent goes out you're usually left with like £100 or less and that's to last you like three months.

The current system here is very good because you're not expected to pay it back until you're earning over £21k which means you're not having to worry about getting a high paid job the second you leave uni. It gives you time to get to where you need to be without being swamped in debt you can't afford.

Uni does have its benefits because in this day and age a lot of companies want a degree from their employee. A lot of the time they don't even care what the degree is, it's just to prove you've put the work in.
Thank you for your input!

So, how much are your tuition fees and do you mind if I ask which uni you attend?

Also do you think that the maintainence loan should not be based on home income if it is already not enough to cover basic living costs?
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EmmaRebecca1997
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#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by HarryGCSE)
Thank you for your input!

So, how much are your tuition fees and do you mind if I ask which uni you attend?

Also do you think that the maintainence loan should not be based on home income if it is already not enough to cover basic living costs?
I'm at Bangor university. My tuition is about £9k a year I think. I do think the way the maintenance grant is worked out is poor because for example I had a flatmate last year who's parents were pretty well off so her maintenance loan was very low. Despite her parents being well off however she didn't have a very close relationship with them so they didn't give her any financial support so she really struggled to make ends meet even with a job. I think they should be based on what your parents are willing to give you in financial support rather than what they earn because just because your parents earn a lot of money doesn't necessarily mean you're going to see any of that money yourself. I was lucky because my parents are low earning so my loan was pretty high but I still don't think it's fair because I was getting like £1k+ more than some people which is ridiculous
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ellster2000
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#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by EmmaRebecca1997)
I'm at Bangor university. My tuition is about £9k a year I think. I do think the way the maintenance grant is worked out is poor because for example I had a flatmate last year who's parents were pretty well off so her maintenance loan was very low. Despite her parents being well off however she didn't have a very close relationship with them so they didn't give her any financial support so she really struggled to make ends meet even with a job. I think they should be based on what your parents are willing to give you in financial support rather than what they earn because just because your parents earn a lot of money doesn't necessarily mean you're going to see any of that money yourself. I was lucky because my parents are low earning so my loan was pretty high but I still don't think it's fair because I was getting like £1k+ more than some people which is ridiculous
You should just get what you need to live off. It shouldn't matter what your parents income is. Most people will never pay back 100% of there loans, so why not give students an extra £1K to live off. I mean, the National Debt is still growing so why not borrow a bit more to make students lives easier.
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riyadhussain123
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#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
It's a broken system, tuition fees are way too high and the maintenance loan is too low to cover the costs, the way the maintenance loan is worked out is awful. It doesn't take into account how much parents are willing or able to give you
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HarryGCSE
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#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by EmmaRebecca1997)
I'm at Bangor university. My tuition is about £9k a year I think. I do think the way the maintenance grant is worked out is poor because for example I had a flatmate last year who's parents were pretty well off so her maintenance loan was very low. Despite her parents being well off however she didn't have a very close relationship with them so they didn't give her any financial support so she really struggled to make ends meet even with a job. I think they should be based on what your parents are willing to give you in financial support rather than what they earn because just because your parents earn a lot of money doesn't necessarily mean you're going to see any of that money yourself. I was lucky because my parents are low earning so my loan was pretty high but I still don't think it's fair because I was getting like £1k+ more than some people which is ridiculous
Yeah I agree! Some parents who might be business owners can control their income to make it seem like they are earning less than they really have just to manipulate the loan. Imo,the maintainence loan should be the same for everyone as afterall, it is a loan and not a grant.
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EmmaRebecca1997
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#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by ellster2000)
You should just get what you need to live off. It shouldn't matter what your parents income is. Most people will never pay back 100% of there loans, so why not give students an extra £1K to live off. I mean, the National Debt is still growing so why not borrow a bit more to make students lives easier.
You answered your own question. Because it's not in the governments interest to give us more than the bare minimum because we very rarely ever pay it back fully. They're not handing out free money just for the banter it's supposed to exist as an investment as the more kids who go to university the less likely they are to be unemployed and the more likely they are to get high paid jobs, which boosts the economy in return.
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EmmaRebecca1997
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#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by HarryGCSE)
Yeah I agree! Some parents who might be business owners can control their income to make it seem like they are earning less than they really have just to manipulate the loan. Imo,the maintainence loan should be the same for everyone as afterall, it is a loan and not a grant.
I mean I understand the concept of what they're trying to do because it's equity not equality: the people who are poorest are given more because they're less likely to get financial aid from their family because they can't afford it, but the system can let some people down due to the fact it's based solely on parental income which only shows so much.
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