Graduated with a 3rd Class Degree... Should I apply for an Msc course? Watch

justdateriguy
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hi everyone,

So I've unfortunately graduated with a 3rd Class degree in Chemical Engineering from Newcastle University. I suffer from depression and anxiety which made me bed bound for 2 weeks at times for the past 4-5 years and I lost all my friends I made from my halls and house mates over the years.

Now that I've graduated and reality has set in, I'm currently in therapy for my depression, I'm currently working in sales - as hard as its been I'm feeling better day by day.

Knowing I won't be able to get f all of a decent job with a 3rd class degree and now that I'm feeling better with therapy,should I apply for a MSC course maybe at coventry university to help improve my job prospects?

Any help is appreciated
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by justdateriguy)
.................
Be careful, because it won't necessarily improve your career prospects. With a third, you are relying on an employer a) not caring about grades, b) liking you as a person and possibly c) appreciating some specific skill you have. For example, I know someone who got a 3rd in engineering and got a job with an organ maker, because he was also a gifted musician and the engineering grade was mitigated by his ability to speak to clients with a lot of credibility about music.

What you need to do is look for work opportunities that reduce the mass competition and where you can make a person to person connection. So don't bother with graduate schemes and don't bother with places like Indeed etc. Look at all the local companies, even tiny one or two person outfits.

Basically, it is experience that will be the best 'cover' for a poor undergrad degree, not a postgrad degree.
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Some universities do accept 3rds for Masters courses, and if you are certain your mental health difficulties have improved and are continuing to do so, there's no reason not to provided you can fund it (which is helped by the postgrad loans scheme).

However, be aware that you may find re-entering the academic sphere causes your mental health to deteriorate and you may in fact lose progress that you've made. It's certainly a possibility but you should carefully consider if you are at the stage where you will be able to go through such a course, and whether you could/should wait longer and continue with your therapy etc.

Also a third isn't a great classification but it is still an honours engineering degree. While you wouldn't be able to apply to e.g. very competitive grad schemes successfully, there are no doubt many roles in the sector which would accept a third, but they may not be the best paid or most well known companies. You may want to look into e.g. Aberdeen based Oil and Gas roles, or Canadian roles in similar sectors in the Oil Sands - they realistically have a need for a large number of engineers, and may well consider one with a poorer degree result in a more junior role (which you could progress from anyway). There are of course other sectors as well where this may be applicable, but chemical engineering certainly does lend itself to this industry.
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by justdateriguy)
Hi everyone,

So I've unfortunately graduated with a 3rd Class degree in Chemical Engineering from Newcastle University. I suffer from depression and anxiety which made me bed bound for 2 weeks at times for the past 4-5 years and I lost all my friends I made from my halls and house mates over the years.

Now that I've graduated and reality has set in, I'm currently in therapy for my depression, I'm currently working in sales - as hard as its been I'm feeling better day by day.

Knowing I won't be able to get f all of a decent job with a 3rd class degree and now that I'm feeling better with therapy,should I apply for a MSC course maybe at coventry university to help improve my job prospects?

Any help is appreciated
Firstly, I'm please that you have managed to graduate with a BEng degree in chemical engineering. From reading your posts from last year, it looks like you have done well to complete the degree. Well done, and hopefully your health continues to improve.

Being honest, a third class degree isn't a great result, but it's still a BEng degree, is still accredited, and you don't have to put your grade on your CV. A lot of what you do at university isn't necessarily what you're going to be doing in industry, and a lot of what constitutes engineering practice isn't taught at university either. James Trevelyan, in his book The Making of an Expert Engineer, references several studies that show that grades don't really relate to workplace performance.

However, this is of little consolation if employers are rejecting you, or asking for a 2:1 or above. Given the amount of applications employers receive, a grade cut-off is an easy way to make things more manageable. You may have to look at other methods other than applying for jobs online.

I don't know whether an MSc will help you. On one hand, some employers prefer applicants with masters degrees. An (accredited) MSc alongside a BEng will meet the academic requirements for chartership, regardless of the grade(s) obtained, whereas just a BEng, even if it's a high first, won't. Some employers will be interested primarily in your bachelors grade, others will not be interested in your bachelors grade if you have a masters, others will be interested in both and others may simply not be bothered about either. Ultimately it's really difficult to say whether an MSc will help you with a poor undergrad degree, and given it's cost it's not something that you should go into lightly. I think the best way to answer this would be to ask people with hiring authority in industry, to see what they say.

However, I am not sure about getting onto a masters degree with a 3rd. Many require a 2:1, although some are open to a 2:2. I don't know how flexible they'll be with a third, and it's not something I have heard much about.

And as artful_lounger says, are you sure this is a good idea for your health? What happens if you go back to study again and your symptoms flare up? Or what happens if you don't pass it? I believe a "pass" grade at MSc is typically 50%, which is higher than a 3rd class bachelors degree. I'm not saying you are definitely not up to it, and it sounds like your performance may be more related to your health rather than your ability, but it's worth considering.

Do you have any relevant work experience? If you're in sales currently, while that isn't engineering, it may help if you want to transition into something like technical sales. Lots of companies that manufacture equipment and produces have technical sales people, i.e. sales people who are equipped with some technical knowledge. It may be worth a look.
1
reply
sherace
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Well done for making it to the end mate! I think an MSc really does improve prospects, as I did a BEng in Chemical Engineering at the University of Hull, and then an MSc at the University of Birmingham to improve my job prospects and it opened a lot of doors for me, got me loads of interviews and landed me an amazing job.

I think that getting the Masters does open you up for a lot of Chemical Engineering jobs for sure. But it would also be good to ensure that you keep the balance of the MSc and your health in mind. I had a friend who wasn't coping at all mentally throughout her MSc and she failed 9/12 modules . Which was terrible and really stressful. MSc is quite hard and a lot to juggle. There is a good deal of support from tutors ect though. But I think you would need to be prepared to handle the strain! You could meet an amazing bunch of people though, as MSc students are generally older, thus a lot more mature (I was the youngest in my class at the tender age of 21), so that could definitely help. So that's something to bear in mind!

But also, if you are going to do the MSc, make sure that it's in a good subject. Research it, and think: will this lead to a viable job prospects? How my MSc uni would look on my CV played a major role in my application process. I chose Birmingham for reputation, as I knew that the reputation would open doors for my future.

I think that you can definitely do it. You know why? To get into Newcastle to do Chemical Engineering shows that you've got lots of brain! And the MSc could be your chance to exhibit that! Your BEng grade could become obsolete! Also in MSc Applications, you can explain why you obtained a certain grade ect. You could call the unis, or ask your parents to call them to find out whether they would consider you based on your situation and if it's worth applying!

And I think, that it might be good to try for a uni that's more of a 'name-brand' for Chemical Engineers like Bath or Birmingham or Leeds etc (Leeds takes 2:2 grades, so give them a ring to explain your situation, and show your passion, and I'm sure they'll be lenient... my friend just did her MSc there, after a BEng at Hull, and just landed a job at Johnson Matthey!!). I've been to sooo many interviews that do this and know that even my current employer exclusively considers candidates from very select universities.

It's great that you're feeling better, I'm really happy to hear it, Uni is such a challenging time and not all of us escape unscathed. Just be balanced with your next move, and try to be very practical in your decision, and don't be afraid to ask, because you never know what you might get if you don't ask. Wishing you the best!
1
reply
trapking
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by sherace)
Well done for making it to the end mate! I think an MSc really does improve prospects, as I did a BEng in Chemical Engineering at the University of Hull, and then an MSc at the University of Birmingham to improve my job prospects and it opened a lot of doors for me, got me loads of interviews and landed me an amazing job.

I think that getting the Masters does open you up for a lot of Chemical Engineering jobs for sure. But it would also be good to ensure that you keep the balance of the MSc and your health in mind. I had a friend who wasn't coping at all mentally throughout her MSc and she failed 9/12 modules . Which was terrible and really stressful. MSc is quite hard and a lot to juggle. There is a good deal of support from tutors ect though. But I think you would need to be prepared to handle the strain! You could meet an amazing bunch of people though, as MSc students are generally older, thus a lot more mature (I was the youngest in my class at the tender age of 21), so that could definitely help. So that's something to bear in mind!

But also, if you are going to do the MSc, make sure that it's in a good subject. Research it, and think: will this lead to a viable job prospects? How my MSc uni would look on my CV played a major role in my application process. I chose Birmingham for reputation, as I knew that the reputation would open doors for my future.

I think that you can definitely do it. You know why? To get into Newcastle to do Chemical Engineering shows that you've got lots of brain! And the MSc could be your chance to exhibit that! Your BEng grade could become obsolete! Also in MSc Applications, you can explain why you obtained a certain grade ect. You could call the unis, or ask your parents to call them to find out whether they would consider you based on your situation and if it's worth applying!

And I think, that it might be good to try for a uni that's more of a 'name-brand' for Chemical Engineers like Bath or Birmingham or Leeds etc (Leeds takes 2:2 grades, so give them a ring to explain your situation, and show your passion, and I'm sure they'll be lenient... my friend just did her MSc there, after a BEng at Hull, and just landed a job at Johnson Matthey!!). I've been to sooo many interviews that do this and know that even my current employer exclusively considers candidates from very select universities.

It's great that you're feeling better, I'm really happy to hear it, Uni is such a challenging time and not all of us escape unscathed. Just be balanced with your next move, and try to be very practical in your decision, and don't be afraid to ask, because you never know what you might get if you don't ask. Wishing you the best!
This thread was a good read. It's why I love TSR.

Was your MSc in Chem Eng again or did you decide to specialise in some area?
0
reply
sherace
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by trapking)
This thread was a good read. It's why I love TSR.

Was your MSc in Chem Eng again or did you decide to specialise in some area?
Hey! It was in Chemical Engineering again, and now I'm a graduate Chemical Engineer! I've always felt like this: Keep your studies broad. Because the fact of the matter is... you will learn your specialism at your job most of the time.

If you want to work as a process engineer in Pharma... don't specialise in Biochemical Engineering ect. Just do straight ChemEng and when you get hired for the job, you WILL 100% be trained for that job. When you specialise too early, the only thing you really achieve is the narrowing of what jobs you can apply for. (For most ChemEng jobs anyway)
0
reply
trapking
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by sherace)
Hey! It was in Chemical Engineering again, and now I'm a graduate Chemical Engineer! I've always felt like this: Keep your studies broad. Because the fact of the matter is... you will learn your specialism at your job most of the time.

If you want to work as a process engineer in Pharma... don't specialise in Biochemical Engineering ect. Just do straight ChemEng and when you get hired for the job, you WILL 100% be trained for that job. When you specialise too early, the only thing you really achieve is the narrowing of what jobs you can apply for. (For most ChemEng jobs anyway)
But surely a 1 year MSc doesn't define your career path that strictly for the reasons you've mentioned i.e. You will be trained in the said role. I personally think as long as your BEng was in something broad then you can do pretty much any engineering MSc you want to specialise in and still be okay job wise even if you change industry (assuming you stay within the realms of your discipline of course).

What industry are you in? I did Mech Eng myself and will be doing an MSc in Subsea Engineering.
0
reply
sherace
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by trapking)
But surely a 1 year MSc doesn't define your career path that strictly for the reasons you've mentioned i.e. You will be trained in the said role. I personally think as long as your BEng was in something broad then you can do pretty much any engineering MSc you want to specialise in and still okay job wise even if you change industry.

What industry are you in? I did Mech Eng myself and will be doing an MSc in Subsea Engineering.
I'm in the Chemicals industry. Yes, I'm sure that it doesn't always box you in, it's definitely not an absolute, the person matters as well, their skills and attitudes. But it was my approach and my personal thought on how I balanced my education in-line with my job prospects.

It can be harder to relate a specialist course to the broad range of jobs that could have been applied for if you had stuck to straight Chem Eng. Because specifically for Chemical Engineering jobs, the trend is to ask for an MEng or MSc level Chemical Engineering degree- not a Bachelors. This is the standard in Chemical Engineering, due to requirements for IChemE chartership and other factors.

Unless you have decided that any job that's not a specialist is not the job for you, then maybe you can see how that might make it harder to find a job. Unless you want to completely branch off, then I would stick to the broader course

On another note... I had a friend who did MSc Subsea Engineering last year at Newcastle actually! He got a great job in a french aerospace company, maybe you know him?
1
reply
trapking
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by sherace)
I'm in the Chemicals industry. Yes, I'm sure that it doesn't always box you in, it's definitely not an absolute, the person matters as well, their skills and attitudes. But it was my approach and my personal thought on how I balanced my education in-line with my job prospects.

It can be harder to relate a specialist course to the broad range of jobs that could have been applied for if you had stuck to straight Chem Eng. Because specifically for Chemical Engineering jobs, the trend is to ask for an MEng or MSc level Chemical Engineering degree- not a Bachelors. This is the standard in Chemical Engineering, due to requirements for IChemE chartership and other factors.
Nice! Are you enjoying your work?

Yeah it's standard for Mech Eng & Civil too but to be honest I find it's mainly the big companies that are most picky with this kind of thing (probably because it usually means they have to pay more if you have a BEng to get you to CEng levels). Some other companies don't care for example, I got a job offer with a global company in the automotive sector but they didn't care if you had a MSc/MEng or BEng...everyone started with the same salary regardless. I declined that job in the end though


(Original post by sherace)

On another note... I had a friend who did MSc Subsea Engineering last year at Newcastle actually! He got a great job in a french aerospace company, maybe you know him?
I don't think I know who that is but I'll be doing my MSc at Uni of Aberdeen (Newcastle was my second choice actually but I felt Aberdeen had the slight edge seeing as it's basically a Global Energy hub and home to the majority of subsea companies in the world).
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Why wouldn't you turn to teachers if you were being bullied?

They might tell my parents (11)
6.21%
They might tell the bully (18)
10.17%
I don't think they'd understand (29)
16.38%
It might lead to more bullying (69)
38.98%
There's nothing they could do (50)
28.25%

Watched Threads

View All