Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys,

    I happened to come across this firm that offers work experience but you have to pay for it.

    One of my friends said that they went through with it and is now working at an accounting firm in central london, completely changed his life he said i should definitely consider it.

    Lots of recruitment agencies are now saying your qualifications are not enough anymore without any relevant experience. Now i know i didn't get the best a levels but i did get a 1st class at uni in Accounting & Finance.

    Not everyone can get into the BIG 4 firms so top 100 is probably good enough for me, I just don't want to be stuck doing sales/customer service anymore nor do i want to do grunt work for free at a small firm, working long hours with no pay.

    1) Do you think investing in yourself through training is beneficial?
    2) The theory you learn at university, does it apply in the working environment? I mean I paid £9000 for 3 years, was it really worth it?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stoleyourgirl)
    Hey guys,

    I happened to come across this firm that offers work experience but you have to pay for it.

    One of my friends said that they went through with it and is now working at an accounting firm in central london, completely changed his life he said i should definitely consider it.

    Lots of recruitment agencies are now saying your qualifications are not enough anymore without any relevant experience. Now i know i didn't get the best a levels but i did get a 1st class at uni in Accounting & Finance.

    Not everyone can get into the BIG 4 firms so top 100 is probably good enough for me, I just don't want to be stuck doing sales/customer service anymore nor do i want to do grunt work for free at a small firm, working long hours with no pay.

    1) Do you think investing in yourself through training is beneficial?
    2) The theory you learn at university, does it apply in the working environment? I mean I paid £9000 for 3 years, was it really worth it?
    I would be very suspicious about this. There have been plenty of posts about this scheme on here and on accountancy websites - none have been positive.

    With a first class degree in London there should be loads of opportunities for entry level work which may help applications for other things without paying. These would look far better on your CV. If you are struggling for work I'd look at your CV, approach to applications and interview skills before doing anything else.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    1) I think it can be beneficial but be very careful if you go down this route. Some companies are scams and some don't offer the training you thought you would get, but it would be too late as they already have their hands on your money. I think the better way is to contact legit companies in your desired field and ask them for work experience. Having a real company's name on your CV will demonstrate that it took you more effort to land the placement and looks far more impressive than training that you paid for (employers can check this). Another advantage is that you can make professional contacts which will be more useful for job hunting.

    2) What you learn at university is useful if you are looking for a career directly related to it. However, it isn't everything. Whilst working, you will need to combine what you learnt with practical experience. Working in real-life situations with real people. Going to university will help you, but you have to work hard to implement the theory independently.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cheesecakelove)
    1) I think it can be beneficial but be very careful if you go down this route. Some companies are scams and some don't offer the training you thought you would get, but it would be too late as they already have their hands on your money. I think the better way is to contact legit companies in your desired field and ask them for work experience. Having a real company's name on your CV will demonstrate that it took you more effort to land the placement and looks far more impressive than training that you paid for (employers can check this). Another advantage is that you can make professional contacts which will be more useful for job hunting.

    2) What you learn at university is useful if you are looking for a career directly related to it. However, it isn't everything. Whilst working, you will need to combine what you learnt with practical experience. Working in real-life situations with real people. Going to university will help you, but you have to work hard to implement the theory independently.
    1) For Corporations, they only hire the best of the best, meaning you might not meet the requirements they're asking for. SME's usually tend to look the other way. As i said i know some friends are working long hours and their work load is exhausting, who are working for free. Most graduates look for training contracts and usually get a part time job in the process. Yes i would say networking is the most important because it's about the people you know.

    2) If you study in your field. Theory based isn't always related to the practical environment. Universities are all Charities meaning they help prepare you for employment.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Articles:

    Guide to finance and bankingGuide to accountancy

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    ICAEW

    "Choose a career journey with limitless possibilities."

    Quick link:

    Unanswered finance and accountancy threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.