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    I want to know a few things. I have never really seen any discussion of which option is a better idea. A master's degree is a bigger commitment but also seems less competitive for offers according to stats. Is applying for masters something we do only after we complete a bachelors? Should I apply for a masters at my top choices and bachelors at my bottom choices so that I have a second chance? I am very confused
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    I want to know a few things. I have never really seen any discussion of which option is a better idea. A master's degree is a bigger commitment but also seems less competitive for offers according to stats. Is applying for masters something we do only after we complete a bachelors? Should I apply for a masters at my top choices and bachelors at my bottom choices so that I have a second chance? I am very confused
    What are your current qualifications? I remember seeing a UCAS PS from you for a review which makes me think you're in secondary school atm? Without a bachelors degree you can't do a masters unless you're doing an integrated or undergrad masters.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    What are your current qualifications? I remember seeing a UCAS PS from you for a review which makes me think you're in secondary school atm? Without a bachelors degree you can't do a masters unless you're doing an integrated or undergrad masters.
    Yes. Ok so I can't apply for MMath courses straight away?
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    Yes. Ok so I can't apply for MMath courses straight away?
    Please read my post properly. Is that an integrated or undergrad masters?
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    I haven't heard about anything like that before. I suppose that changes my question to should I apply for an undergrad masters or integrated masters degree, given my circumstances?
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    I want to know a few things. I have never really seen any discussion of which option is a better idea. A master's degree is a bigger commitment but also seems less competitive for offers according to stats. Is applying for masters something we do only after we complete a bachelors? Should I apply for a masters at my top choices and bachelors at my bottom choices so that I have a second chance? I am very confused
    There are two kinds of Masters degrees

    1. Integrated Masters
    2. Postgraduate Masters

    Integrated Masters are undergraduate masters degree which is part of your undergraduate course such as MMath, MEng and MPhys. These masters are an additional year, where, in certain cases, you spend the additional (4th year) pursuing research or combined project work.

    The level of work for an MEng is at a higher level and many courses at top unis require higher A' Level grades to get in.

    The Postgrad Masters (MSc or MPhil) is the generic masters that you pursue after your undergraduate degree. It has a separate application approach with separate requirements i.e. you must get a 1st or 2.1 to get into certain top programmes.

    The Intergrated Masters is beneficial to certain degrees. For example, if you are studying chemical engineering, i have heard that many large oil companies dont recruit candidates with less than an MEng or MSc. Also, certain Physics programmes accept MPhys for direct entry into a 4-year PhD programme.

    For you, you will need to consider what you want to do and your future plans. If you are taking a STEM programme in a very competitive field, it is often advisable to either enroll for the integrated 4 year Master programme or consider pursuing further studies at postgrad master level.

    If you are studying a standard course and just want to graduate, then the 3 yesr BEng course may be the option for you. My advice is to think about it and speak to your potential uni departments.

    One thing to bear in mind is that Integrated Masters courses tend to have higher A' Level requirements and may be difficult to achieve. A trick is to apply gor the Bachelors course and then transfer to the integrate masters course when you are at the uni. It is often required that you are on track for a 1st or a 2.1 to be able to transfer.

    All the best
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    There are two kinds of Masters degrees

    1. Integrated Masters
    2. Postgraduate Masters

    Integrated Masters are undergraduate masters degree which is part of your undergraduate course such as MMath, MEng and MPhys. These masters are an additional year, where, in certain cases, you spend the additional (4th year) pursuing research or combined project work.

    The level of work for an MEng is at a higher level and many courses at top unis require higher A' Level grades to get in.

    The Postgrad Masters (MSc or MPhil) is the generic masters that you pursue after your undergraduate degree. It has a separate application approach with separate requirements i.e. you must get a 1st or 2.1 to get into certain top programmes.

    The Intergrated Masters is beneficial to certain degrees. For example, if you are studying chemical engineering, i have heard that many large oil companies dont recruit candidates with less than an MEng or MSc. Also, certain Physics programmes accept MPhys for direct entry into a 4-year PhD programme.

    For you, you will need to consider what you want to do and your future plans. If you are taking a STEM programme in a very competitive field, it is often advisable to either enroll for the integrated 4 year Master programme or consider pursuing further studies at postgrad master level.

    If you are studying a standard course and just want to graduate, then the 3 yesr BEng course may be the option for you. My advice is to think about it and speak to your potential uni departments.

    One thing to bear in mind is that Integrated Masters courses tend to have higher A' Level requirements and may be difficult to achieve. A trick is to apply gor the Bachelors course and then transfer to the integrate masters course when you are at the uni. It is often required that you are on track for a 1st or a 2.1 to be able to transfer.

    All the best
    so if i apply for the integrated masters. Would that 1) mean i'm then in that uni for the next 4 years? 2) mean that i am more likely to get offers?

    (my AS level grades are strong and my target is to achieve 4A*s and do well in step so tough offers are ok for me)
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    https://university.which.co.uk/searc...evance&button=

    this is an example of what i'm talking about. (Look at offer rates) It's similar for all of my more competitive choices. Does this mean anything
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    so if i apply for the integrated masters. Would that 1) mean i'm then in that uni for the next 4 years? 2) mean that i am more likely to get offers?

    (my AS level grades are strong and my target is to achieve 4A*s and do well in step so tough offers are ok for me)
    1. Yes. MMath is 4 years long. BSc is 3 years.
    2. Depends. MMath may have slightly higher requirements than a BSc.
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    https://university.which.co.uk/searc...evance&button=

    this is an example of what i'm talking about. (Look at offer rates) It's similar for all of my more competitive choices. Does this mean anything
    If you don't quote or tag people they won't know that you would like them to reply.

    I'd worry less about offer rates and more about whether you meet the requirements and will be happy doing a 4 year degree (or need to). 4 year degrees have their pros and cons as do 3 year degrees so consider those carefully.
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    What kind of career are you looking to go into? If it really requires a masters, then you could consider applying for an integrated masters, but otherwise I would apply for a undergraduate bachelors first. It may be that your degree is enough for your career without the needs for a masters. A masters would add another year or so to your degree and more cost.

    I would assume that integrated masters have stricter and higher requirements. If you think about it, you are applying for both a bachelors AND a masters, so it wouldn't be that easy to get into.

    (Original post by pagefan)
    so if i apply for the integrated masters. Would that 1) mean i'm then in that uni for the next 4 years? 2) mean that i am more likely to get offers?

    (my AS level grades are strong and my target is to achieve 4A*s and do well in step so tough offers are ok for me)
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    (Original post by cheesecakelove)
    What kind of career are you looking to go into? If it really requires a masters, then you could consider applying for an integrated masters, but otherwise I would apply for a undergraduate bachelors first. It may be that your degree is enough for your career without the needs for a masters. A masters would add another year or so to your degree and more cost.

    I would assume that integrated masters have stricter and higher requirements. If you think about it, you are applying for both a bachelors AND a masters, so it wouldn't be that easy to get into.
    ahh ok
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    so if i apply for the integrated masters. Would that 1) mean i'm then in that uni for the next 4 years? 2) mean that i am more likely to get offers?

    (my AS level grades are strong and my target is to achieve 4A*s and do well in step so tough offers are ok for me)
    1. Yes, you will be at the uni for 4 years
    2. If you have the entry requirements then you are more likely to get an offer because fewer people apply for integrated masters programmes
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    A trick is to apply gor the Bachelors course and then transfer to the integrate masters course when you are at the uni.
    It's worth mentioning that if you do an integrated masters course, you may well be able to finish at the end of the third year and leave with a BSc. But if that's something you might want to do you should check with the university concerned before you apply.

    For example, Bristol say (at http://www.bristol.ac.uk/unit-progra...Code=2MATH004U ):
    Integrated Master's degrees may also allow the opportunity for a student to exit from the programme with an equivalent Bachelor's degree where a student has achieved 360 credit points, of which 90 must be at level 6, and has successfully met any additional criteria as described in the programme specification.
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    (Original post by martin7)
    It's worth mentioning that if you do an integrated masters course, you may well be able to finish at the end of the third year and leave with a BSc. But if that's something you might want to do you should check with the university concerned before you apply.

    For example, Bristol say (at http://www.bristol.ac.uk/unit-progra...Code=2MATH004U ):
    I agree, but most students who enter integrated masters courses know what they are getting into and tend to do the complete 4 years.

    The OP has to do some research and be clear in their intention.
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    I agree, but most students who enter integrated masters courses know what they are getting into and tend to do the complete 4 years.

    The OP has to do some research and be clear in their intention.
    My intention is to study mathematics for at least 4 years and hopefully go into research. But I would like to make sure that my master's is at the best university possible. Having said that, looking at the 'offer rates' swayed me at first but then if I've understood correctly, applying for masters and bachelors are separate so applying for the integrated course can't improve your chances of getting an offer.
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    I mean competitiveness is a pretty big factor for me. Like for durham we go from 50% to 83% Do you think it's still harder to apply for masters because the quality of candidates is far better?
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    (Original post by pagefan)
    My intention is to study mathematics for at least 4 years and hopefully go into research. But I would like to make sure that my master's is at the best university possible. Having said that, looking at the 'offer rates' swayed me at first but then if I've understood correctly, applying for masters and bachelors are separate so applying for the integrated course can't improve your chances of getting an offer.
    (Original post by pagefan)
    I mean competitiveness is a pretty big factor for me. Like for durham we go from 50% to 83% Do you think it's still harder to apply for masters because the quality of candidates is far better?
    I think fewer people choose integrated masters and so the offer rate will be higher. This may be due to the reason that most of those candidates already know their plan and study hard to get it.

    As it has been mentioned, you need to clearly know what the requirements are and where you stand. No need to try to play the system by applying to a top course at Cambridge, Manchester or Imperial with weak grades and hope to get in through the back door.

    All the best
 
 
 
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