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    I plan on applying to Oxford. I got 6A* 3A and 1B. Hoping for 4A* 1A at A-levels. I looked around and lots of people have said that your gcses aren't good enough for med at oxford. Try cambridge instead. I was wondering whether getting a really high bmat score could help and whether it is worth applying to Oxford because ultimately, you only get 4 choices and I don't want to waste a choice.
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    If you look at past admissions statistics here https://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/me...cal/statistics you'll see that it's extremely unlikely to be invited to interview with less than 7 A*, or below a 70% proportion of A*s. BMAT is very hard and you'll need at least an average of 6 to compensate your GCSEs, if not higher.
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    Does anyone know if Oxford accept GCSE equivalents in the number of A* count? Also my % A* is 81% without equivalents and 83% with is this high enough for Ox? Overall results 11A*2A , 9A*2A without equivs
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    I plan on applying to Oxford. I got 6A* 3A and 1B. Hoping for 4A* 1A at A-levels. I looked around and lots of people have said that your gcses aren't good enough for med at oxford. Try cambridge instead. I was wondering whether getting a really high bmat score could help and whether it is worth applying to Oxford because ultimately, you only get 4 choices and I don't want to waste a choice.
    I reckon go for camb as your A level predictions are great (you're almost predicted to get at A level what you got at GCSE) But if you like Ox may be just sweat it on the BMAT....
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    ...you only get 4 choices and I don't want to waste a choice.
    You are right on this point, and as khookie mentioned, your chances are quite low. Gambling on getting a very high BMAT is not going to be worth it.

    The exception would be if you had significant extenuating circumstances around your GCSEs. In those cases people do sometimes get in e.g. https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ions_statist_3
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    You are right on this point, and as khookie mentioned, your chances are quite low. Gambling on getting a very high BMAT is not going to be worth it.

    The exception would be if you had significant extenuating circumstances around your GCSEs. In those cases people do sometimes get in e.g. https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ions_statist_3
    Well I did my GCSEs from an area which was not great and I checked on University of Nottingham postcode checker and it said (check spoiler). I'm sure there are other universities which take this into account but I haven't been able to research this bit yet.

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    This means that the area in which you live is considered to be an area of disadvantage or low progression to higher education. If you submit an application for undergraduate study for 2018 entry, your application will meet the geo-demographic indicator, and will therefore receive a Widening Participation Flag.
    A Widening Participation Flag is only one among many pieces of information that admissions decision-makers use in the selection process, and does not mean you will be made a lower offer or that you will automatically receive an offer.
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    Well I did my GCSEs from an area which was not great and I checked on University of Nottingham postcode checker and it said (check spoiler). I'm sure there are other universities which take this into account but I haven't been able to research this bit yet.

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    Show


    This means that the area in which you live is considered to be an area of disadvantage or low progression to higher education. If you submit an application for undergraduate study for 2018 entry, your application will meet the geo-demographic indicator, and will therefore receive a Widening Participation Flag.
    A Widening Participation Flag is only one among many pieces of information that admissions decision-makers use in the selection process, and does not mean you will be made a lower offer or that you will automatically receive an offer.

    You can e-mail Oxford and ask whether this would get your a contextual flag. Your school's 5A*-C rate is also likely relevant.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    You can e-mail Oxford and ask whether this would get your a contextual flag. Your school's 5A*-C rate is also likely relevant.
    That's the first thing i'll do tmrw then I guess. And my school's 5A*-C rate is not that high from what I remember but I will email my school and get them to forward me some statistics too. Thanks for your help
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    And my school's 5A*-C rate is not that high from what I remember but I will email my school and get them to forward me some statistics too. Thanks for your help
    Should be available online.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Should be available online.
    Hi nexttime, my schools %5A*-C is 51% which is slightly below the average of 53%. Would you imagine the average %5A*-C for Oxford applicants would be lower or higher than the national average?

    Also, I am worried they won't accept my gcse equivalent qualifications in which case I would have 9A*2A which seems quite low by Oxford's standards. With all my qualifications (F.maths and ICT) I would have 11A*2A. Is it worth risking it with Oxford? I also like Cambridge but my Maths UMS was quite low at AS and my predictions aren't amazing A*A*A so not sure...
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Should be available online.
    I tried to look them but they weren't available. Ill look again
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    (Original post by DvsAmjed)
    Hi nexttime, my schools %5A*-C is 51% which is slightly below the average of 53%. Would you imagine the average %5A*-C for Oxford applicants would be lower or higher than the national average?
    Substantially higher, of course!

    I do not know to what degree that will impact your application.

    Also, I am worried they won't accept my gcse equivalent qualifications in which case I would have 9A*2A which seems quite low by Oxford's standards. With all my qualifications (F.maths and ICT) I would have 11A*2A. Is it worth risking it with Oxford? I also like Cambridge but my Maths UMS was quite low at AS and my predictions aren't amazing A*A*A so not sure...
    They probably won't accept your GCSE equivalents.

    "If applicants had not taken GCSEs or IGCSEs ranking was based on BMAT score alone" - https://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/me...cal/statistics

    9A*s and 82%A*s is still good enough to consider an application.

    Cambridge have been forced to change their admissions policy due to AS being removed. It is unclear how it will now be used, where it exists. In previous years you'd have been stupid to apply with average UMS <90. Now - who knows.

    At either university it will all come down to the BMAT.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Substantially higher, of course!

    I do not know to what degree that will impact your application.



    They probably won't accept your GCSE equivalents.

    "If applicants had not taken GCSEs or IGCSEs ranking was based on BMAT score alone" - https://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/me...cal/statistics

    9A*s and 82%A*s is still good enough to consider an application.

    Cambridge have been forced to change their admissions policy due to AS being removed. It is unclear how it will now be used, where it exists. In previous years you'd have been stupid to apply with average UMS <90. Now - who knows.

    At either university it will all come down to the BMAT.
    Its so sad cos I was 1 mark off achieving 10A*1A . One of my GCSE equivalents I think was actually an iGCSE (F maths), so it will be considered but not used in the shortlisting algorithm.

    Not so sure about Camb, I should imagine many applicants will have predicted 4A* or higher
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    (Original post by DvsAmjed)
    Its so sad cos I was 1 mark off achieving 10A*1A . One of my GCSE equivalents I think was actually an iGCSE (F maths), so it will be considered but not used in the shortlisting algorithm.

    Not so sure about Camb, I should imagine many applicants will have predicted 4A* or higher
    I think they would include the IGCSE, as per the previous quote.

    Cambridge will give BMAT and interview will be given vastly more weight than predicted grades. Don't worry about that.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I think they would include the IGCSE, as per the previous quote.

    Cambridge will give BMAT and interview will be given vastly more weight than predicted grades. Don't worry about that.
    Which one would you recommend Nexttime, purely looking in terms of chances? I am a bit borderline for both as for Camb I have lower UMS and A level performance then some people and for Oxford my GCSE are lower than the average successful applicant although this may be partly compensated by the fact I came from a low performing school... I would like to give Oxbridge a shot though because I really like the course style.

    Also, even though F maths is iGCSE Oxford said they don't accept qualifications that are harder than GCSE level in the algorithm

    Thanks
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    (Original post by DvsAmjed)
    Which one would you recommend Nexttime, purely looking in terms of chances? I am a bit borderline for both as for Camb I have lower UMS and A level performance then some people and for Oxford my GCSE are lower than the average successful applicant although this may be partly compensated by the fact I came from a low performing school... I would like to give Oxbridge a shot though because I really like the course style.
    I've given my honest opinion above and don't have the information to comment further. Its very close.

    Pick the one you like more - there are differences.

    Also, even though F maths is iGCSE Oxford said they don't accept qualifications that are harder than GCSE level in the algorithm
    In what way is it harder than GCSE? IGCSEs are considered equivalent. Do they specifically mention further maths or something?
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    In what way is it harder than GCSE? IGCSEs are considered equivalent. Do they specifically mention further maths or something?
    Thanks I appreciate your help Nexttime. Yeah they mentioned further maths particularly as it comes between gcse and AS level. They would still consider but they just can't use it in the gcse calculation because it wouldn't be fair as it is harder than a gcse (so contextual data can't be applied to it).

    Any way...
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    You can e-mail Oxford and ask whether this would get your a contextual flag. Your school's 5A*-C rate is also likely relevant.
    I emailed Oxford and they gave me this reply:

    1. The Medical School does consider some qualifications in the shortlisting process if they are GCSE equivalents and can be assessed on a scale that includes A*. If the candidate cannot gain A*, then it is likely that the qualification will not be used in the GCSE calculation, so that there is no adverse impact on the proportion of GCSE A* grades. AQA Level 2 Further Maths, for example, is often listed as an iGCSE and is counted.

    2. An example of a successful candidate with a lower GCSE score that received a higher contextualised score (and eventually an offer) would be candidate X. Their initial GCSE score was: -0.169, rising to 0.384 with contextualisation. X had 7 A* at GCSE, with an overall proportion of 0.78. The proportion of pupils at their school with 5 or more GCSE at A-A* in the year they took their GCSEs was: 0.1. Their overall BMAT score was: 57.17.

    3. An example of a successful candidate with higher GCSE grades that received a lower contextualised score (and eventually an offer) would be candidate Y. Their initial GCSE score was: 0.773, lowering to 0.121 with contextualisation.
    Y had 10 A* at GCSE, with an overall proportion of 1. The proportion of pupils at their school with 5 or more GCSE at A-A* in the year they took their GCSEs was: 0.98. Their overall BMAT score was: 73.17.

    My GCSE including 2 equivalents was 11A*2A (9A*2A without) and my school had 0.13 proportion of 5+A*-A so I decided to make an application. Based on this it seems I could get an interview with about 54 on BMAT although looking at previous admissions statistics it seems they have changed the contextual system so can't be sure...
 
 
 
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