Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I want to do either physics or aerospace engineering at university. I was leaning more towards aerospace until I realised I don't have anything engineering based to write down for my personal statement, compared to lots of things for a physics personal statement, for example telescope work at a local university, awards for physics and physics books having been read.

    Does this mean I should probably apply for a physics degree? I'd be more than happy to do it, I just think aerospace would be a better degree to do career wise. What jobs do people with physics degrees get?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    All of that is equally relevant to engineering. They won't expect anything more specific and even having that is more than many will have.

    You're overthinking it

    Do Physics if you want to be a Physicist - there are already too many wannabe IBankers who think it's more esoteric (or bizarrely, easy) than engineering and will get them noticed more easily. If you aren't interested in the fundamental theories of the natural world, then it's just an exercise in futility. If you just want to solve differential equations all day long then get a comfortable pay packet, engineering is the more direct route (although either of them will suitably prepare you to do so, although you may need to jump through an extra hoop or so from Physics).

    I'd realistically suggest to be wary of pursuing engineering purely because you want a cushy job as described above, as you may find the course not to your liking as a result - whether you drag yourself through it to a 2:1 may be easier or harder depending on your personal approach to things. If you like applying physics to problem solve and using it to design solutions to these problems, then engineering isn't a bad option (although physics will also do the same to an extent).
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Showing plenty of experience for Maths and Physics with an enthusiasm to engineering will be enough. You could still go into engineering from physics that is quite common and there are many more options from research to banking. I have even heard of Physics graduates becoming lawyers. Physics leaves a lot more doors open for you.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alwaysfergy)
    Showing plenty of experience for Maths and Physics with an enthusiasm to engineering will be enough. You could still go into engineering from physics that is quite common and there are many more options from research to banking. I have even heard of Physics graduates becoming lawyers. Physics leaves a lot more doors open for you.
    In practice it is very hard for someone with a physics degree to enter engineering (not including software engineering) even though it says that they consider physics degrees, producing the experience that is gained in a engineering degree (lots of relevant project work, both group and individual) that employers look for.

    Other than jobs that specifically just ask for physics (which is very few) no doors are closed to people who do engineering degree vs physics degree
    • Official TSR Representative
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by United2810)
    I want to do either physics or aerospace engineering at university. I was leaning more towards aerospace until I realised I don't have anything engineering based to write down for my personal statement, compared to lots of things for a physics personal statement, for example telescope work at a local university, awards for physics and physics books having been read.

    Does this mean I should probably apply for a physics degree? I'd be more than happy to do it, I just think aerospace would be a better degree to do career wise. What jobs do people with physics degrees get?
    This is a scenario that not only I found myself in--but one a lot of my coursemates in physics found themselves in! I personally chose physics, and as a final year with lots of already-graduated friends I thought I'd give my advice in regards to jobs myself/my friends are going in to.

    I know quite a few people (I want to say at least 50% of fellow coursemates?) who are now in engineering jobs--like a previous commenter said in this thread, physics leaves a LOT of doors open. In some ways, this can be great--the varying module content means you can be introduced to something you had no idea you loved! E.g. at Herts, I was able to take a Rocket Propulsion module that rocked my socks off. In others, if you already have a pretty firm idea of what you want, this means you can be left feeling like you wanted to give more time to certain topics/themes.

    However, this gap is pretty easily filled by summer placements. Summer placements were what made my friends equally as employable by companies as engineering students, especially if they dealt with some kind of programming. It'd also be the ideal way to test out what career/field you personally want in the future! Whichever course you choose, please do summer placements if at all possible!

    Overall, I'd take a look at module overviews for a physics vs. an engineering course (especially for first year, this won't change much between different Unis). Which modules do you take a fancy to? Are the physics modules that aren't directly related to aerospace still appealing to you? Remember, whilst modules like "Thermal and Condensed Matter" may sound more dry than "Rocket Propulsion", the overall physics concepts won't change between the two modules. What will change is how in-depth they are and what kind of problems are presented (physics problems will be more broad/applicable--this is why physics graduates have more doors open to them; whilst engineering problems will be geared toward solving problems in the specific context of aerospace and be much less theoretical).

    If you have any more questions, please do let me know!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.