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    As part of Dyslexia Awareness Week 2017, we've got a number of threads running on some of the themes of dyslexia. #PositiveDyslexia2017

    So with that in mind, we decided to have a little debate:

    Is Dyslexia a Disability?


    Discuss.:holmes:
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    As part of Dyslexia Awareness Week 2017, we've got a number of threads running on some of the themes of dyslexia. #PositiveDyslexia2017

    So with that in mind, we decided to have a little debate:

    Is Dyslexia a Disability?


    Discuss.:holmes:
    I feel in most way it is for me but it doesn't mean that I m unable to do things instead I find it harder to do or have to do things in a different way. Looking at it positively I have pretty good problem solving skills because I ve had to solve problems with doing simple tasks my whole life.
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    I'll probably be shot down, but, while I'm sure that it must be very upsetting, I feel that Dyslexia is a difficulty rather than a disability. I believe the Equality Act definition of a disability is that a condition must substantially affect your ability to carry out essential daily activities. I'd consider this to mean things like bathing, caring for your home, shopping, dressing, cooking & eating etc and I don't believe Dyslexia fits with this.

    However, there is so much software, equipment and concessions etc available to help overcome the difficulties of Dyslexia, that it's only right this support is given to help those affected reach their full potential.

    The government does not give disability benefits to those with Dyslexia and, for this reason, I feel that support should be made available entirely by schools, colleges and universities.
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    (Original post by Lovesick)
    I'll probably be shot down, but, while I'm sure that it must be very upsetting, I feel that Dyslexia is a difficulty rather than a disability. I believe the Equality Act definition of a disability is that a condition must substantially affect your ability to carry out essential daily activities. I'd consider this to mean things like bathing, caring for your home, shopping, dressing, cooking & eating etc and I don't believe Dyslexia fits with this.

    However, there is so much software, equipment and concessions etc available to help overcome the difficulties of Dyslexia, that it's only right this support is given to help those affected reach their full potential.

    The government does not give disability benefits to those with Dyslexia and, for this reason, I feel that support should be made available entirely by schools, colleges and universities.
    I can see where you are coming from but someone with severe dyslexia might feel they do have a disability under a couple of those criteria like shopping when you re unable to read and your short term memory is that bad you don't remember what you ve spent or just did two minutes ago.
    Technically reading is on a pip scale but you re right it's unlikely you ll get disability benefits with dyslexia alone.
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    I have always wondered what the difference was between a disability and a difficulty? Are they the same ? they seem to be used interchangeably.

    I have always thought and seen a disability as something impacting someone's daily life of activities like movement, thought process, shopping and the likes.
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    (Original post by Lovesick)
    I'll probably be shot down, but, while I'm sure that it must be very upsetting, I feel that Dyslexia is a difficulty rather than a disability. I believe the Equality Act definition of a disability is that a condition must substantially affect your ability to carry out essential daily activities. I'd consider this to mean things like bathing, caring for your home, shopping, dressing, cooking & eating etc and I don't believe Dyslexia fits with this.

    However, there is so much software, equipment and concessions etc available to help overcome the difficulties of Dyslexia, that it's only right this support is given to help those affected reach their full potential.

    The government does not give disability benefits to those with Dyslexia and, for this reason, I feel that support should be made available entirely by schools, colleges and universities.
    I'm not sure what planet you're coming from, but reading is necessary to function in every day life.

    It's actually a huge impedance for blind people, as they have to solely rely on audio cues and e.g. require someone else to assist them very frequently to read a menu in a restaurant, read a sign that has directions to where they want to go, or a street name, etc, etc.

    For a dyslexic person, the extent to which they are affected wouldn't be as large, but it would still massively slow down and cause errors in their day to day activity which is the very definition of a disability. While they can "avoid" situations or jobs where this is likely to be a problem, this is itself an issue, which speaks to virtually any debate on disabilities held by those without them. The very requirement to rely on other people, other things, have some situation turn into a "thing" requiring time and effort by others to do something relatively simple that people without disabilities have to concern themselves with or even think about is bad.

    The goal for accessibility should be to enable disabled people to have the same personal agency as those without disabilities - this is the difference between a ramp entrance to a shop, enabling someone requiring a wheelchair or similar to go in on their own, vs somewhere that has a step on entry to the shop and no ramp,k but they keep a plank of wood in the back in case someone with a wheelchair wants to go in. In order to benefit from the same things as anyone else (in this case, the shop) they need to make the decision to request help from the shopkeeper, they need to stop what they're doing, go get the thing, and then help them into the shop. Meanwhile it's entrely possible for the shopkeeper and the other customers who may have been talkking with them to resent the disabled person for being a "problem" while the disabled person has to experience embarrassment and social discomfort just to go in. Imagine if they go in and don't find anything they want - it's very upsetting for a disabled person because then they may feel that they are "obligated" to buy something due to the perceived "inconvenience". All of this is avoided simply by removing the systemic barrier that prevents them engaging with whatever it is as someone without a disability.

    In the case of dyslexia, it clearly will affect their day to day life to some extent (reading price tags, reading signs for directions, reading information for e.g. bus/train arrivals, writing notes and memos for work, etc, etc). They don't receive disability benefit because dyslexia doesn't as heavily restrict their ability to find a paid position or work full time, and it is still protected so that ensures that a dyslexic person can't be discriminated against due to their dyslexia and employers are required to make reasonable adjustments for dyslexic employees. That doesn't mean it's not a disability, since clearly the latter part there indicates that there is some requirement (and hence, recourse) for adjustments to be made. In some situations/positions (such as academic ones) this is much more likely to create greater problems - so schools, universities, and the like are obligated to provide correspondingly greater support.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I have always wondered what the difference was between a disability and a difficulty? Are they the same ? they seem to be used interchangeably.

    I have always thought and seen a disability as something impacting someone's daily life of activities like movement, thought process, shopping and the likes.
    Physical disability (e.g. wheelchair bound is the most common stereotype). Others (sensory, like me); Mental; or a severe learning difficulty are less likely to be the image of a typical disabled person in your head.:yep:
    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I'm not sure what planet you're coming from, but reading is necessary to function in every day life.
    Savage.:giggle:
    (Original post by Lovesick)
    I'll probably be shot down, but, while I'm sure that it must be very upsetting, I feel that Dyslexia is a difficulty rather than a disability. I believe the Equality Act definition of a disability is that a condition must substantially affect your ability to carry out essential daily activities. I'd consider this to mean things like bathing, caring for your home, shopping, dressing, cooking & eating etc and I don't believe Dyslexia fits with this.

    The government does not give disability benefits to those with Dyslexia and, for this reason, I feel that support should be made available entirely by schools, colleges and universities.
    The actual definition is substantial, long-term condition which affects day-to-day living. Dyslexia doesn't go away. So it's long term. The definition they give for substantial is "not trivial". So by saying that Dyslexia is not a disability you're saying that it is trivial? Not a great move is it?:giggle:

    Disabled Students Allowance is available to sever dyslexics.:yep:
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    As part of Dyslexia Awareness Week 2017, we've got a number of threads running on some of the themes of dyslexia. #PositiveDyslexia2017

    So with that in mind, we decided to have a little debate:

    Is Dyslexia a Disability?


    Discuss.:holmes:
    Yep!
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    As part of Dyslexia Awareness Week 2017, we've got a number of threads running on some of the themes of dyslexia. #PositiveDyslexia2017

    So with that in mind, we decided to have a little debate:

    Is Dyslexia a Disability?


    Discuss.:holmes:
    Its a disability cos it affects people’s every day life .
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    (Original post by Elisha.l)
    Its classed as both cos it’s in the spld catorgrie which stands for specific learning disability / difficulty
    Correct.:yy:

    Do you agree with this?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Correct.:yy:

    Do you agree with this?
    I think it’s a disability cos it affects you every day and it’s long term , it can’t get better
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    (Original post by Elisha.l)
    I think it’s a disability cos it affects you every day and it’s long term, it can’t get better
    PRSOM. I especially like the last bit. It can feel better if you adapt to it though?
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    PRSOM. I especially like the last bit. It can feel better if you adapt to it though?
    Yes it can feel better but it’s still there it never goes away . It’s not like you can just wave a magic wand or sprinkle some fairy dust and that’s it it’s a lot better .
    Do you think it’s a disability? 04MR17
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    (Original post by Elisha.l)
    Yes it can feel better but it’s still there it never goes away . It’s not like you can just wave a magic wand or sprinkle some fairy dust and that’s it it’s a lot better .
    Do you think it’s a disability? 04MR17
    Since I am hosting this debate, I do not have an opinion.

    but since you asked...
    Sever dyslexia is a disability. I know plenty of people with more mild forms who do not seem to be very needy in my un-qualified opinion. What I don't know or understand (because I'm neither a psychologist or a doctor) is where the variations within dyslexia exist to give severe/mild distinctions, which is why my complete opinion is not yet fully formed.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Since I am hosting this debate, I do not have an opinion.

    but since you asked...
    Sever dyslexia is a disability. I know plenty of people with more mild forms who do not seem to be very needy in my un-qualified opinion. What I don't know or understand (because I'm neither a psychologist or a doctor) is where the variations within dyslexia exist to give severe/mild distinctions, which is why my complete opinion is not yet fully formed.
    Most dyslexics have the same problems it’s just that others have them worse . When you get tested the do these little tests and for each test you get a number and basically the lower the number or the further it is always from the national average for you age group determines how bad you have dyslexia. If it’s very far from the national average then you are serverly dyslexic but if it’s quite close then it’s mild . The dyslexic scale goes from A-E ,A being not dyslexic at all and E being really serve dyslexic
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    (Original post by Elisha.l)
    Most dyslexics have the same problems it’s just that others have them worse . When you get tested the do these little tests and for each test you get a number and basically the lower the number or the further it is always from the national average for you age group determines how bad you have dyslexia. If it’s very far from the national average then you are serverly dyslexic but if it’s quite close then it’s mild . The dyslexic scale goes from A-E ,A being not dyslexic at all and E being really serve dyslexic
    I think that the people that have dyslexia or no someone quite close to them who has dyslexia will see it as a disability because they she how it affects there life .
    But people that don’t know much about dyslexia believes it’s a difficulty , people aren’t really educated about dyslexia they only get told that it’s problems with reading , writing and spelling.they don’t get told exactly what it is that is affecting them .
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    I'm a 52 year old third year undergraduate ,at UAL , and was only diagnosed with dyslexia and dyspraxia this summer , which has been an amazing revelation after being told at school and by my late father how stupid and intellectually lazy I was . Now, issues of having no sense of direction ( I got lost on my way to the assessment centre inEast London !) clumsiness, short term memory ,slow reading spead and the inability to follow simple instructions coherently, have finally made some sort of sense and I am getting help and support to write my Dissertation. If I had not had the diagnosis I was seriously considering leaving my course because , the thought of writing and failing in my eyes to do my best filled me with fear and dread.
    Whilst not using it as an excuse I do feel that these conditions are not taken seriously outside of academe ,in the work place especially . One has to work harder to function effectively, and I often spent at least 10 hours a week ,unpaid overtime, just to keep up,with admin tasks so my colleagues would not think I was lazy or workshy .
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    People don’t know enough things about dyslexia if people understud it then we wouldn’t be called lazy or stupid .

    Teachers don’t even seam to pick up on it either all my way through primary school , every parents evening I would get told that a rush my work and was making stupid spelling mistakes . I wasn’t rushing my work it was cos I am dyslexic but my primary school failed to recognise that , and cos they didn’t recognise it it made my life hell , every parent evening I would come home upset cos my parents will be having ago at me for to concentrating on my work and rushing it . They made my feel stupid cos all of the other kids were moving up on the book stages but I wasn’t moving up so fast .

    I just wish that people will understand it more .
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    I want to say yes but is have to say no. I would say more a difficulty than disability. I mean sure give them extra time in exams and help where they really need it but I wouldn't go much more than that.

    I know that difficulties and disabilities come in different scales to severity and i see dyslexia on the lower end of it. I know what im about to say it stupid but ima say it anyway. You wouldnt see a dyslexic person at the paralympic purely for their dyslexia.

    My father has only 20% hearing since birth and my mother (before she passed) was wheelchair bound. If someone said that dyslexia was a disability to them they would have chuckled and asked for a trade.
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    (Original post by DavidaH)
    I'm a 52 year old third year undergraduate ,at UAL , and was only diagnosed with dyslexia and dyspraxia this summer , which has been an amazing revelation after being told at school and by my late father how stupid and intellectually lazy I was . Now, issues of having no sense of direction ( I got lost on my way to the assessment centre inEast London !) clumsiness, short term memory ,slow reading spead and the inability to follow simple instructions coherently, have finally made some sort of sense and I am getting help and support to write my Dissertation. If I had not had the diagnosis I was seriously considering leaving my course because , the thought of writing and failing in my eyes to do my best filled me with fear and dread.
    Whilst not using it as an excuse I do feel that these conditions are not taken seriously outside of academe ,in the work place especially . One has to work harder to function effectively, and I often spent at least 10 hours a week ,unpaid overtime, just to keep up,with admin tasks so my colleagues would not think I was lazy or workshy .
    This is an incredible story.:yep:
    (Original post by Elisha.l)
    People don’t know enough things about dyslexia if people understund it then we wouldn’t be called lazy or stupid .

    Teachers don’t even seem to pick up on it either all my way through primary school, every parents evening I would get told that I rush my work and was making stupid spelling mistakes. I wasn’t rushing my work it was because I am dyslexic but my primary school failed to recognise that, and because they didn’t recognise it it made my life hell, every parent evening I would come home upset cos my parents will be having ago at me for to concentrating on my work and rushing it. They made my feel stupid cos all of the other kids were moving up on the book stages but I wasn’t moving up so fast.

    I just wish that people will understand it more.
    That's the whole point of the awareness weeks and things. We can keep the conversations going on TSR if they get engagement from the users.
    (Original post by Guru Jason)
    I want to say yes but is have to say no. I would say more a difficulty than disability. I mean sure give them extra time in exams and help where they really need it but I wouldn't go much more than that.

    I know that difficulties and disabilities come in different scales to severity and i see dyslexia on the lower end of it. I know what im about to say it stupid but ima say it anyway. You wouldn't see a dyslexic person at the paralympic purely for their dyslexia.

    My father has only 20% hearing since birth and my mother (before she passed) was wheelchair bound. If someone said that dyslexia was a disability to them they would have chuckled and asked for a trade.
    Can a learning difficulty not be a disability too? Or are they mutually exclusive?
 
 
 
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