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Who should replace TM as leader of the Tories? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Who should be Conservative leader in 2018/19?
    Theresa May (or Amber Rudd)
    9
    11.84%
    Boris Johnson
    20
    26.32%
    Other (please state)
    47
    61.84%

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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    That's the unknown. They chose May because she was was super safe and they did not want another radical leader. The general election may have caused them to reconsider that though in which case a back bench MP could come through as they gamble. Equally fear could see them go for Rudd as the most like May i suppose.
    They may want their own Corbyn now. Also the last leadership didn't go to a membership vote so how do you know how they would have voted?
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    An interesting question is who would Tory MPs choose as the two candidates for the party membership vote? I think it's pretty unlikely that Boris would be one of the two, which would cause havoc with the party, as they love him in the Tory grassroots.
    Boris would probably get blocked by the MPs. But someone from his Brexit wing would get on the ballot. So someone like Boris would get the leadership. The two put forward to the membership would most likely be someone like Amber Rudd (but not necessarily her) against someone like Boris (almost certainly not Boris). In which case the more Brexity one wins (the Boris clone).

    Honestly I think Mogg has a better chance than Boris of getting to the membership vote. Which is scary because I think he would win against the inevitable soft Brexit camaroon standing against him.

    A Mogg vs Corbyn election would be so simultaneously hopeful and terrifying.

    Spoiler:
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    The "centrist" hissy fits would be a sight to behold however. The tears of Nick Cohen would be so sweat XD




    Fun times.
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    I reckon a monkey in a suit could negotiate a better brexit deal than May.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    They may want their own Corbyn now. Also the last leadership didn't go to a membership vote so how do you know how they would have voted?
    Depends what you mean by their own Corbyn but if we assume a purist then it's probably Mogg.

    If we are looking at 2010 ministers though then how about this for a roll of the dice..



    Personally i think he's absolutely brilliant. A remainer but supports May's hard Brexit position and a guy who can chew people up and crap them out in a debate. Also incredibly accomplished.. Rory Stewart MP.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Depends what you mean by their own Corbyn but if we assume a purist then it's probably Mogg.

    If we are looking at 2010 ministers though then how about this for a roll of the dice..



    Personally i think he's absolutely brilliant. A remainer but supports May's hard Brexit position and a guy who can chew people up and crap them out in a debate. Also incredibly accomplished.. Rory Stewart MP.
    Thank you for posting this, very excellent stuff.

    Stewart would make a superb foreign Sec... wouldn’t be my first choice for PM but wouldn’t be far off either. I think Streeartd weakness might be that’s he’s a bit too clever. I get a definite Ed Miliband vibe from him.

    I think we need a no-nonsense down to earth leaver with a more socially conservative agenda- my nomination goes to David Davies

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iB2CmHjtB_o
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Depends what you mean by their own Corbyn but if we assume a purist then it's probably Mogg.
    The whole Mogg=Corbyn / Moggmentum = Momentum theory is such a laugh, it's incredible that the Tory membership think RM is their Corbyn - but if one thing could usher in the Corbynium, it's appointing the ludicrously up himself hilarious toff and the Tweedy Buffer's Tweed Buffer - William Rees-Mogg Esq (born, 1692) as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. :lol:

    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Personally i think he's absolutely brilliant. A remainer but supports May's hard Brexit position and a guy who can chew people up and crap them out in a debate. Also incredibly accomplished.. Rory Stewart MP.
    Stewart's one of the cleverer ones on the Tory backbenches (he also seems to be a sincere, honest guy with a solid background in diplomacy and lots of academic credentials), but that video clip above really demonstrates what he's up against in his chosen party (he was Labour when young) - his elegantly proposed debating points fall on the deaf ears of the Tory nutters, for whom any sort of right, let alone human ones, sound suspiciously like telegrams from the Kremlin or perhaps (worse) the trade unions. Anyway, Stewart would doubtless do a good job as Defence Secretary or something like that.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    The whole Mogg=Corbyn / Moggmentum = Momentum theory is such a laugh, it's incredible that the Tory membership think RM is their Corbyn - but if one thing could usher in the Corbynium, it's appointing the ludicrously up himself hilarious toff and the Tweedy Buffer's Tweed Buffer - William Rees-Mogg Esq (born, 1692) as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. :lol:

    I meant in the sense both Corbyn and Mogg are popular with the membership of the respective parties.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    I meant in the sense both Corbyn and Mogg are popular with the membership of the respective parties.
    Yes, I realise. I was just doing some blathering. :teehee: Rees-Mogg always makes me laugh as he's like a caricature of some kind of retro Tory chic from the 30s or similar. At the same time, it's quite scary to think what directions Britain will take under his premiership.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    The whole Mogg=Corbyn / Moggmentum = Momentum theory is such a laugh, it's incredible that the Tory membership think RM is their Corbyn - but if one thing could usher in the Corbynium, it's appointing the ludicrously up himself hilarious toff and the Tweedy Buffer's Tweed Buffer - William Rees-Mogg Esq (born, 1692) as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. :lol:
    Why is it such a laugh? Both backbenchers opposed to ‘modernisation’ if their parties- both mocked by their establishment leaders, both popular with the grassroots and both offer straightforward, principled and honest politics.


    Stewart's one of the cleverer ones on the Tory backbenches (he also seems to be a sincere, honest guy with a solid background in diplomacy and lots of academic credentials), but that video clip above really demonstrates what he's up against in his chosen party (he was Labour when young) - his elegantly proposed debating points fall on the deaf ears of the Tory nutters, for whom any sort of right, let alone human ones, sound suspiciously like telegrams from the Kremlin or perhaps (worse) the trade unions. Anyway, Stewart would doubtless do a good job as Defence Secretary or something like that.
    By ‘Tory nutters’ do you mean those who take a conservative approach (‘Virtue ethics’) to ethical decisions?
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    The DUP haven't really betrayed anyone. They are a right wing party anyway and they gained a **** tone of money for Northern Ireland. If I were a NI citizen I would be happy about the increase in money for my country, even if I was greatly apposed to what the DUP stand for. If anyone is going to be punished for the Con/DUP set up it will be the conservatives.

    If the lib dems had managed to get rid of tuition fees as part of the coalition deal they would be in a much better position. Although I admit it would still be problematic as the lib dems were pitching themselves to the left of labour, never mind the cons. Then went into coalition with the cons and pursued an austerity agenda.
    They hold the slimmest of leads over Sinn Fein and siding with the party enforcing a Brexit that most of NI didn't want is likely to outweigh a one-off £1 billion bung.
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    (Original post by Midlander)
    They hold the slimmest of leads over Sinn Fein and siding with the party enforcing a Brexit that most of NI didn't want is likely to outweigh a one-off £1 billion bung.
    If that logic were true then the general election would not have given the DUP a stonking victory.
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    Some good Scottish Polling for Labour. They've jumped into second place and are now only 10% or so behind the SNP.

    As a Labour government becomes a more realistic possibility, I expect that a lot of the SNP vote will come back to Labour.
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    Pretty slim pickings isn't it
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    If that logic were true then the general election would not have given the DUP a stonking victory.
    They are neck and neck with Sinn Fein in the assembly elections and over time the demographics are only going one way. They are on borrowed time and this shortens it.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    If that logic were true then the general election would not have given the DUP a stonking victory.
    Though notionally under the now-abandoned proposed boundaries Sinn Féin would have won more seats than the DUP. No prizes for guessing what might have finally led to their abandonment...
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    Why is it such a laugh? Both backbenchers opposed to ‘modernisation’ if their parties- both mocked by their establishment leaders, both popular with the grassroots and both offer straightforward, principled and honest politics.




    By ‘Tory nutters’ do you mean those who take a conservative approach (‘Virtue ethics’) to ethical decisions?
    The policies that differentiate Corbyn from those who came before him (economic populism in the form of rail/utility nationalisation, higher minimum wages, and greater taxes/regulation on the financial sector) tend to poll fairly to very well with the public. The policies that differentiate JRM from the current Tory leadership (traditional social values in the form of being anti-abortion, anti-LGBT rights, and in favour of traditional family structures) tend to poll like a lead balloon - that's a pretty crucial difference.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    The policies that differentiate Corbyn from those who came before him (economic populism in the form of rail/utility nationalisation, higher minimum wages, and greater taxes/regulation on the financial sector) tend to poll fairly to very well with the public. The policies that differentiate JRM from the current Tory leadership (traditional social values in the form of being anti-abortion, anti-LGBT rights, and in favour of traditional family structures) tend to poll like a lead balloon - that's a pretty crucial difference.
    That’s just the way you’ve framed it though

    JRMs policies on crime and immigration are quite popular

    Corbyns views on certain groups. Defence and domestic policies are not so popular last time I checked.
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    That’s just the way you’ve framed it though

    JRMs policies on crime and immigration are quite popular

    Corbyns views on certain groups. Defence and domestic policies are not so popular last time I checked.
    His immigration stance is popular, but no different to the rest of the party - no more free movement, keep attracting skilled migrants, new regulations. Meanwhile I can't find much at all about his stance on crime. He just seems to lack a unique selling point other than maybe if he made a huge push on housing.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    His immigration stance is popular, but no different to the rest of the party - no more free movement, keep attracting skilled migrants, new regulations. Meanwhile I can't find much at all about his stance on crime. He just seems to lack a unique selling point other than maybe if he made a huge push on housing.
    I think authenticity is the thing here. Just as with labour s lot of MPs will say one thing in public and another in private- eg voters would probably be right in trusting Corbyn to renationalise rail than Burnham say.
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    (Original post by Midlander)
    They are neck and neck with Sinn Fein in the assembly elections and over time the demographics are only going one way. They are on borrowed time and this shortens it.
    If demographics were all that mattered then we'd have seen semi-permanent Labour governments since the 70's. Parties and people adapt or die while retaining key aspects. Need i remind you that in 20 years of heavily unfriendly demographic change the Tories increased vote share at every single election albeit gradually to the point that they poll now as well as Thatcher.

    The EU referendum is another fantastic example since the idea that the country will grow more europhile requires there to have been a peak in skeptic support before the referendum. We know this is likely not true.

    Do i think the DUP will hold all their current views in 20 years, probably not. But i do expect them to be no worse off than now. Parties are not as suicidal as people think.
 
 
 
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