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How are you supposed to study in University? Watch

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    Hi everyone,

    Well basically I got into a Uni in London and I'm currently in my first week, and what came into my mind is I do not get how are you supposed to study here.

    I know it may be just the first week, which is not even finished yet, but can anyone tell me what are you supposed to do? We are given readings before every lecture, along with further readings, but we are not told what are you meant to do with them, apart from, obviously, reading. Are you meant to take extensive notes on every lecture? Do you need to be able to recall their contents if you want to get a first, or are they just there for in-lecture discussion?

    And in lectures, ugh, they just read off the power-point, in the majority of them anyways, so what's the point of coming to economics lecture, if I can find those
    slides online? Taking notes during lectures also seems weird, as 99% of the stuff the lecturer
    says is a recollection of the powerpoint.

    I know this may seem like a first-week panic, but could anyone give advice on how to study constantly and effectively, what do you need to do, in general? I just feel like I got this whole University idea wrong, as I was very used to school "listen-do prep-get a grade" type of education.
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    As it is just the first week, you won't be expected to do a lot of work. It is usually down the line when you will need to do more. You will have seminars, tutorials and assignments to work on. At the moment, you could focus on doing some reading from the list and any other relevant reading that you find out.
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    I used to just do the 'essential' reading before the lecture, highlighting some of the key points, and then go into the lecture and make extensive notes (on the slides). When it came to revision period, I'd then go back through all of the reading and make notes on each of the articles - just because I tend to need to write things down in order to remember them (you really do need to show that you've read around the topic to get a first, especially in 2nd and 3rd year - it admittedly doesn't matter so much in first year - I did very little of this back then).

    I got a first. I did lots of extra reading, but only really towards exam period.

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by Whasupman)
    Hi everyone,

    Well basically I got into a Uni in London and I'm currently in my first week, and what came into my mind is I do not get how are you supposed to study here.

    I know it may be just the first week, which is not even finished yet, but can anyone tell me what are you supposed to do? We are given readings before every lecture, along with further readings, but we are not told what are you meant to do with them, apart from, obviously, reading. Are you meant to take extensive notes on every lecture? Do you need to be able to recall their contents if you want to get a first, or are they just there for in-lecture discussion?

    And in lectures, ugh, they just read off the power-point, in the majority of them anyways, so what's the point of coming to economics lecture, if I can find those
    slides online? Taking notes during lectures also seems weird, as 99% of the stuff the lecturer
    says is a recollection of the powerpoint.

    I know this may seem like a first-week panic, but could anyone give advice on how to study constantly and effectively, what do you need to do, in general? I just feel like I got this whole University idea wrong, as I was very used to school "listen-do prep-get a grade" type of education.
    It might vary per course, but for Politics this is what I do. For each seminar I have to do the readings marked 'essential' (usually 2 or 3 things), and I'll also have the notes from each lecture (and yes, some of the lecturers aren't great and just read off the slides). Then for essays and exams, I'd choose my topic(s) and start by reading the other items in the reading list for that topic. Once the reading list has been covered, I'd then use Google Scholar to find lots of other sources.

    How to 'read' varies per student, as some just highlight the text, whereas I make notes on all the key points so in theory I don't need to return to the source material, other than to find out page numbers.
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    And yes, as said above, Google Scholar is brilliant for academic journals/articles that you can cite in your exams (if you're aiming for a high first then this is essential!).
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    (Original post by JME1993)
    I used to just do the 'essential' reading before the lecture, highlighting some of the key points, and then go into the lecture and make extensive notes (on the slides). When it came to revision period, I'd then go back through all of the reading and make notes on each of the articles - just because I tend to need to write things down in order to remember them (you really do need to show that you've read around the topic to get a first, especially in 2nd and 3rd year - it admittedly doesn't matter so much in the first year - I did very little of this back then).

    I got a first. I did lots of extra reading, but only really towards exam period.

    Hope this helps!
    Thank you and everyone else for their replies. That is what I am doing currently right now, but the problem is that there is virtually not enough to do - especially when you consider people saying that to get a first you should treat it like a 9/5 job - I end up working about 3 hours outside of lectures and than sit there rest of the day browsing web, thus feeling very unproductive, but I guess that just is the first week.
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    (Original post by Whasupman)
    Thank you and everyone else for their replies. That is what I am doing currently right now, but the problem is that there is virtually not enough to do - especially when you consider people saying that to get a first you should treat it like a 9/5 job - I end up working about 3 hours outside of lectures and than sit there rest of the day browsing web, thus feeling very unproductive, but I guess that just is the first week.

    Yeah, it is just the first week. I can guarantee that won't be the case come December.
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    (Original post by cheesecakelove)
    As it is just the first week, you won't be expected to do a lot of work. It is usually down the line when you will need to do more. You will have seminars, tutorials and assignments to work on. At the moment, you could focus on doing some reading from the list and any other relevant reading that you find out.
    Well this is blatantly false for me :/

    I've had 6 assignments, 4 quizzes, 1 exam along with 16 lectures, 2 seminars and a supervision in the space of not even a week - in the first week...
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Well this is blatantly false for me :/

    I've had 6 assignments, 4 quizzes, 1 exam along with 16 lectures, 2 seminars and a supervision in the space of not even a week - in the first week...
    Where is this and which course?
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    (Original post by JME1993)
    Where is this and which course?
    Maths and Econ at York
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Well this is blatantly false for me :/

    I've had 6 assignments, 4 quizzes, 1 exam along with 16 lectures, 2 seminars and a supervision in the space of not even a week - in the first week...
    It does depend on the course and university. For a lot of students that I knew, the first week was kind of like an introduction week. After then, they would be expected to read for seminars, work on essays and presentations, etc.

    What course are you studying?
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    (Original post by Whasupman)
    Hi everyone,

    Well basically I got into a Uni in London and I'm currently in my first week, and what came into my mind is I do not get how are you supposed to study here.

    I know it may be just the first week, which is not even finished yet, but can anyone tell me what are you supposed to do? We are given readings before every lecture, along with further readings, but we are not told what are you meant to do with them, apart from, obviously, reading. Are you meant to take extensive notes on every lecture? Do you need to be able to recall their contents if you want to get a first, or are they just there for in-lecture discussion?

    And in lectures, ugh, they just read off the power-point, in the majority of them anyways, so what's the point of coming to economics lecture, if I can find those
    slides online? Taking notes during lectures also seems weird, as 99% of the stuff the lecturer
    says is a recollection of the powerpoint.

    I know this may seem like a first-week panic, but could anyone give advice on how to study constantly and effectively, what do you need to do, in general? I just feel like I got this whole University idea wrong, as I was very used to school "listen-do prep-get a grade" type of education.
    The lectures seem fairly pointless, I had one today where the lecturer stood in the corner of the lecture hall and just read a powerpoint, very engaging. Needless to say most of the students were falling asleep.
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Maths and Econ at York
    Sounds like fun!!
 
 
 
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