Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I'm studying for my A2s currently, taking bio, chem, geology and EPQ. I would like to study either biology or chemistry at uni (NOT biochemistry though- I've looked at the modules for Biochem on various sites and it's deffo not the area of bio or chem that I am interested in). I love organism biology, and I LOVE being outside doing field work, after being on various bio and geol trips with school I realised I would not like to be stuck in a lab all the time. But I really love chemistry as well, I know I am very good at chemistry and enjoy the theoretical work in class, as well as even some of the maths side of it. I just don't want to always be in the lab and I feel that degree level chem could be very challenging. I also know that there are more job prospects for chem grads. Taking geology has combined some bio and chem, however I don't want to do this at uni as it really isn't very challenging at all, and there really isn't enough bio or chem in it at all for me to not feel like I was missing out.(I also prefer the more organic sciences- rather than physical if that makes sense?? So organisms and chemicals, rather than bare rocks??) Basically, I don't know what degree to to take without feeling that I would be missing out on my favourite parts of the other or getting the job that I want out of it!! This is terribly particular and rambly, so sorry! But we'll done if you got to the end, please HELP!!!!
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Biogeochemgal)
    I'm studying for my A2s currently, taking bio, chem, geology and EPQ. I would like to study either biology or chemistry at uni (NOT biochemistry though- I've looked at the modules for Biochem on various sites and it's deffo not the area of bio or chem that I am interested in). I love organism biology, and I LOVE being outside doing field work, after being on various bio and geol trips with school I realised I would not like to be stuck in a lab all the time. But I really love chemistry as well, I know I am very good at chemistry and enjoy the theoretical work in class, as well as even some of the maths side of it. I just don't want to always be in the lab and I feel that degree level chem could be very challenging. I also know that there are more job prospects for chem grads. Taking geology has combined some bio and chem, however I don't want to do this at uni as it really isn't very challenging at all, and there really isn't enough bio or chem in it at all for me to not feel like I was missing out.(I also prefer the more organic sciences- rather than physical if that makes sense?? So organisms and chemicals, rather than bare rocks??) Basically, I don't know what degree to to take without feeling that I would be missing out on my favourite parts of the other or getting the job that I want out of it!! This is terribly particular and rambly, so sorry! But we'll done if you got to the end, please HELP!!!!
    have you looked into flexible natural science degrees?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    have you looked into flexible natural science degrees?
    Yeah, ideally that would have been good for me, but all the natural science courses I've looked at require maths at A level, and I don't do it :'(
    UPDATE: I found that Uni of Leeds do a Natural Sciences degree that doesn't require maths!! Leeds is also my favourite uni so far, WOO!
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Biogeochemgal)
    Yeah, ideally that would have been good for me, but all the natural science courses I've looked at require maths at A level, and I don't do it :'(
    Are there any environmental science courses that could suit you?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Are there any environmental science courses that could suit you?
    I haven't really looked into environmental science, as I never thought it to be all that sciency (as in, more to do with economy/ ethics/ geography) but I may look into it, as I hear more and more people recommending it for the likes of me, torn between bio and chem. I'll see...
    Thanks for your help!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    What's suitable for someone interested in organic chemistry and biochemistry?
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Have you looked at any unis that may offer chemistry as an optional module?

    I don't know if it exists but what if you looked at the course breakdown and the modules?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LibertySea)
    Have you looked at any unis that may offer chemistry as an optional module?

    I don't know if it exists but what if you looked at the course breakdown and the modules?
    Yaas I would frickin love that, all I've seen so far is Biochem/ earth science optional modules, I'll keep searching though :')
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Biogeochemgal)
    Yaas I would frickin love that, all I've seen so far is Biochem/ earth science optional modules, I'll keep searching though :')
    I found that Keele University does Chemistry and Human Biology as a course as well as Biology and Chemistry in a dual degree or something along those lines
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Which aspects of Chemistry do you enjoy? A lot of universities ask for Maths A Level if you want to study Chemistry, so look into this.
    I study Biology, and I can tell you a bit about what I've studied.

    First year you will definitely have a Chemistry module and a Statistics module, and most classes will be merged with other Biosciences (Biochemistry, Biomedical sciences, Nutrition or Anthropology, Zoology).
    I attended a different university for my first year, and there were no Zoology or Anthropology departments, meaning we pretty much just did modules from Biomedical sciences and Biochemistry.

    Second year (at my new university) was a mix of Biomedical sciences (modules like molecular and cell bio, immunology etc) and Zoology/Anthropology modules. There was one optional chemistry module on pharmacology. There were two compulsory modules: Molecular Bio and a Field Course (which was quite fun).

    Third year (where I am now) has a lot more options. I don't have to do any modules from the Biomedical Sciences programme anymore, and the only compulsory module was my dissertation. So, this year I'm studying 3 modules which are pretty much all from the Zoology programme (modules on conservation, aquatic species and animal behaviour etc), and one module on statistics and software used for analysis in biology.

    So I would suggest that you look at the modules offered in Year 1, 2 and 3, and compare these between different universities, because every university will take a different approach to Biology. Also, PM me if you're interested in the modules I studied and I can let you know which university it is. Good luck
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Why not both? Biochemistry!

    Anyway, most of the above is good advice, but bear in mind often you can go into biological areas of research with a chemistry background, but going the other way is much harder in general. So that may be worth considering. But as above, a Natural Sciences course would probably be a good option to look into.

    Regarding environmental science, this is a fairly broad area and while some courses are more policy oriented, there is a lot of basic science research in this area. Courses such as Earth Sciences, Oceanography, Geology/Geophysics, Environmental Geoscience etc are primarily science based, rather than policy/economically oriented, and depending on specific directions within those can entail a fair amount of chemistry or biology (or both). Some examples are paleontological aspects of geology, aspects of biogeochemical cycles in earth sciences, or marine ecology aspects of oceanography.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LibertySea)
    I found that Keele University does Chemistry and Human Biology as a course as well as Biology and Chemistry in a dual degree or something along those lines
    Ooh this sounds good! Thanks for your help
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Quick Link:

    Unanswered Life Sciences Threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.