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    Greetings.

    First off, a little about myself.

    I am 22 year old first year math student.

    I had quite an unorthodox education when I was younger. Moved around a lot, and this caused me to change schools about 10 times during my basic education (up to GCSE). I then started a GCSE program (14 in 2 years), but during my first year I changed schools again, and it was into a different syllabus, so I had no idea what was going on. For my second year of GCSE's, I moved to yet another school, and took 7 in a year. It was good, 4A* 3A 1B.

    I started my first year of a levels at the same school. My plan was maths in a year, physics AS for first year, further maths in a year physics A2 for second year.

    In About February of my first year of a levels,I left that school, due to reasons out of my control. I then got a job and a math tutor, and studied out of school for my maths a level and physics AS at the end of the year. I did pretty well in maths (A) due to my tutor, but I got a C in physics.

    I was happy with my result in math, but I couldn't afford to keep myself in education to get my further maths A level, so I decided to keep with my job, and forget about it.

    Fast forward 6 years.

    I realised I was not happy with my career, and I wanted to do something that I enjoyed, maths. So I rang every uni in a 30 mile radius and found one that would take me on their maths course with just an A-level in maths and a physics AS. I was over the moon.

    However, now I'm here, I don't understand a lot of what is being said in my lectures. We've covered what a set is, and a few basic definitions, and I get all of that. But then we moved onto relations and the different types, and i understood about 20% of what my lecturer said at the time, and now I'm home I understand approximately 0% of it.

    I talked to a few of my classmates (is that the word?) and about 2 of them admit to not understand much of what is being said.

    Is this normal? When I was doing my a level, I understood 100% of the material, and I lost marks on my exam due to errors in calculations and stuff like that, not because I simply had no idea what I was being asked.

    I feel like I should understand more of what is being said, but I don't know how to ask for help without interrupting the lecture and saying "I got no idea what you're on about".

    Is it normal to not even grasp the concepts being talked about in your first week?

    I have gone to uni because I wanted to learn and understand and broaden my horizons, but I feel like I have made a huge mistake and that I am not smart enough to be here.

    Anyone else feel like this on their first week? If so, does it get better?
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    YouTube videos are your friend!!! Seriously Khan academy, Maths easy, Eddie woo... list goes on. Just make sure you aren't watching the ones where they just work through an example but those which actually explain the meaning.
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    Maths is like that, the more you learn the more you realise you don't know. Trust me, most people feel that way (I still do and I'm in 3rd year!).

    Just stick with it
 
 
 
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