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    An aqueous solution of glucose or an aqueous solution of carbon dioxide at 25 Celsius and why?
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    Are the concentrations the same?
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    Entropy is a measure of disorder. So what do you think has more disorder - an aqueous solution or a gas?
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    (Original post by PleaseHelppppp)
    An aqueous solution of glucose or an aqueous solution of carbon dioxide at 25 Celsius and why?
    Tempted to say glucose because it is a bigger and bulkier molecule.
    HOWEVER
    An aqueous solution of CO2 will form carbonic acid, and as a result form a lot more molecules if the starting solutions were at the same concentrations.

    This is higher in priority than the size of the molecules, so I'd say that the solution of carbon dioxide has higher entropy.
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    Are the concentrations the same?
    Yes
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    (Original post by Mythirdleg)
    Entropy is a measure of disorder. So what do you think has more disorder - an aqueous solution or a gas?
    They are both in aqueous solution. Would the 25 degrees mean that a low temperature is being used so therefore small entropy increase? Im not too sure
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    (Original post by RizK)
    Tempted to say glucose because it is a bigger and bulkier molecule.
    HOWEVER
    An aqueous solution of CO2 will form carbonic acid, and as a result form a lot more molecules if the starting solutions were at the same concentrations.

    This is higher in priority than the size of the molecules, so I'd say that the solution of carbon dioxide has higher entropy.
    Hm good point. Would the temperature of 25 degrees affect it and give a higher entropy due to more kinetic energy etc
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    (Original post by PleaseHelppppp)
    Hm good point. Would the temperature of 25 degrees affect it and give a higher entropy due to more kinetic energy etc
    No i guess, that's there because at room temp. (25deg) the co2 is very soluble. If you increase the temperature though, the solubility decreases, and at a point CO2 won't dissolve anymore. near this point the kinetic energy and all those would make the Glucose solution more entropic than the aqueous co2.

    That's just a guess though, chemistry tests like to mention temperatures anyway.
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    (Original post by RizK)
    No i guess, that's there because at room temp. (25deg) the co2 is very soluble. If you increase the temperature though, the solubility decreases, and at a point CO2 won't dissolve anymore. near this point the kinetic energy and all those would make the Glucose solution more entropic than the aqueous co2.

    That's just a guess though, chemistry tests like to mention temperatures anyway.
    Which has higher entropy?
    A solution of sodium chloride at 50 celsius or a solution of sodium chloride at 25 celsius.
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    (Original post by PleaseHelppppp)
    Which has higher entropy?
    A solution of sodium chloride at 50 celsius or a solution of sodium chloride at 25 celsius.
    50 degrees, no doubt. Sodium Chloride is a ionic salt, and its solubility should increase with temperature, so that problem we had with Co2 (a gas) shouldnt be here. The kinetic energy will be higher at 50 deg so the entropy will be higher here.
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    (Original post by PleaseHelppppp)
    They are both in aqueous solution. Would the 25 degrees mean that a low temperature is being used so therefore small entropy increase? Im not too sure
    Hang on a second - you said 25 Celsius. So 25C is like a very warm summer day in London. You really think CO2 is a liquid at room temperature lol😂😂😂
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    (Original post by Mythirdleg)
    Hang on a second - you said 25 Celsius. So 25C is like a very warm summer day in London. You really think CO2 is a liquid at room temperature lol😂😂😂
    Um, an "aqueous solution" is one where its dissolved into something, for example, a solution of sodium chloride (salt) and water would be an aqueous solution of sodium chloride, in this case its probably sparkling water and also sugar water of the same concentration.

    Using this logic I'd say that the solution of CO2 has a higher entropy as it's trying to escape from the liquid to become a gas again meanwhile the sugar would not be trying to become gaseous as it's solid at room temperature.
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    Um, an "aqueous solution" is one where its dissolved into something, for example, a solution of sodium chloride (salt) and water would be an aqueous solution of sodium chloride, in this case its probably sparkling water and also sugar water of the same concentration.

    Using this logic I'd say that the solution of CO2 has a higher entropy as it's trying to escape from the liquid to become a gas again meanwhile the sugar would not be trying to become gaseous as it's solid at room temperature.
    Sorry to be a turd in the water pipe or for being pedantic .... but CO2 does not exist as an aqueous solution at room temperature
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    (Original post by Mythirdleg)
    Sorry to be a turd in the water pipe or for being pedantic .... but CO2 does not exist as an aqueous solution at room temperature
    Aqueous Definition.
    Spoiler:
    Show




    "Aqueous is a term used to describe a system which involves water. The word aqueous is also applied to describe a solution or mixture in which water is the solvent. When a chemical species has been dissolved in water, this is denoted by writing (aq) after the chemical name. "

    meaning if carbon dioxide was dissolved in water then it'd be an aqueous solution.





    Spoiler:
    Show




    "CO2 is soluble because water molecules are attracted to these polar areas. The bond between carbon and oxygen is not as polar as the bond between hydrogen and oxygen, but it is polar enough that carbon dioxide can dissolve in water. "





    this means that carbon dioxide can be an aqueous solution.
    another bit:
    Spoiler:
    Show




    Aqueous carbon dioxide, CO2 (aq), reacts with water forming carbonic acid, H2CO3 (aq). Carbonic acid may loose protons to form bicarbonate, HCO3- , and carbonate, CO32-. In this case the proton is liberated to the water, decreasing pH.





    so ya, sparkling water is an aqueous solution of CO2.
    What you seem to be telling me is that sparkling water isnt possible as carbon dioxide is a gas at room temperature, using this logic would mean water its self isnt possible as oxygen is also a gas at room temperature.

    Aqueous in chemistry is shown in that definition. so CO2(aq) does exist, you may be confused with CO2(l) which doesnt exist at room temperature unless in a highly pressurized container.
 
 
 
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