Student1600
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I do bio chemistry and maths, I am predicted AAA for them and I am not really sure what degree I should do?
I was thinking maybe going into actuarial sciences since I enjoy maths, what other courses are there where there can be a cross between maths and sciences?
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999tigger
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(Original post by Student1600)
I do bio chemistry and maths, I am predicted AAA for them and I am not really sure what degree I should do?
I was thinking maybe going into actuarial sciences since I enjoy maths, what other courses are there where there can be a cross between maths and sciences?
https://medium.com/@apondihazel/so-y...e-6d20d7670f1c

Just do your research and look at what each degree involves to see if it interests you.

Its mostly Biology, Chemistry , Medicine and Pharmacy, so no obvious Maths and Sciences.
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ihatePE
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engineering?
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artful_lounger
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Any STEM subject will involve some maths, in some way. The extent to which it does include it varies quite a bit.

Obviously courses in mathematical sciences including mathematics, statistics, operations research, computer science, actuarial science, financial mathematics, and the like, will be very heavy on maths. However most of the courses will be fairly different from the maths you're familiar with as they will place increasing emphasis on rigorously proving results from abstract mathematics, which then can be applied in various ways. Some may be less heavy on this, such as financial mathematics course or computer science, depending on the course and university.

Within the natural sciences, Physics and Chemistry are both necessarily mathematical. Physics of course requires mathematics as the language in which it is written, so to speak - physics without maths is just...GCSE/A-level Physics. For core undergraduate topics like quantum mechanics, mathematics is not simply a descriptive tool but is in fact integral to the fundamental structure of the topic. Chemistry is, in some ways, "applied physics". Certainly the areas of quantum mechanics and statistical physics/thermodynamics found on any physics course will come up inevitably in Chemistry under the broad area of Physical Chemistry. As with Physics, mathematics is necessary to a minimal level (beyond A-level Maths that is) to have any more than a trivial description of the subject. Relevant courses would be any Chemistry course, joint honours (including major/minor type courses) in Chemistry and/with Mathematics, and Chemical Physics or Chemistry with Physics/Molecular Physics (which may or may not be accessible without a physics background - it's a fairly uncommon course in itself however).

More broadly, quantitative methods form a core of scientific investigation and enterprise, and being able to understand and handle data is common to all sciences. Within the physical sciences, such as Earth Sciences and related topics, great emphasis is placed on the development of mathematical models based on empirical data, allowing scientists to predict phenomena without necessarily having to observe it. Within the biosciences, due to the complexity of the systems such relatively simple models will usually not suffice, so acquiring and understanding data and performing statistical analyses on them is important to develop understanding of these systems and processes. There are more quantitative approaches to biosciences, usually emphasizing computational methods to analyse complex systems. Some more mathematical aspects of biosciences can be found in bioinformatics, systems biology, biophysics and mathematical biology - which can all refer to similar, related, or identical topics, as well as some more disparate ones. There is not much in a name.

Beyond these, maths is used extensively in the applied sciences which focus on utilising the aforementioned mathematical models. This would include every field of engineering and various subfields of the above. While most engineering fields require a background in physics, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Bio(chemical/medical) Engineering and sometimes even more "traditional" Engineering courses like Civil/Electronic/Mechanical Engineering may not require a physics background explicitly, although this will necessarily be developed.
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Analyst89
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Engineering comes to mind, physics is also another great degree.

If you enjoy maths, you can also study finance as a degree.
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