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    I would like to become a maths teacher and would like to know what it is like at uni.
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    I kid It's very different from Maths at school. The emphasis is on proving rigorously many concepts in mathematics, in the most general form - often some fairly simple things you take for granted in school maths. The proofs for these can often be extremely abstract even for some deceptively simple concepts. It is however very rewarding when you do nail down a difficult proof, and there are plenty of "eureka" moments when everything suddenly slots into place, which is nice

    How necessary or useful this is to become a maths teacher, I'm not certain. It is necessary for students seeking the top teaching positions in France to undertake some pretty rigorous maths and their maths education system is considered one of the better ones so...it's probably not bad to have a strong background in abstract mathematics. But there are other ways, if you're not particularly encouraged by the abstract nature of single honours maths - for example physics or engineering I believe usually have a suitable mathematical background for a Maths PGCE.
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    Pretty weird, occasionally interesting, and not as hard as you'd think. I am not sure what it is that makes a person suited to university maths, but some certainly are put off by how vastly different it tends to be when compared to A-level. Naturally there is much more emphasis on proof and rigour, and when A-level maths stuff does come up, e.g. derivatives and trig identities, you are expected to be able to perform the calculations quickly and with ease. It is a step up, for sure, and some people get on with it more than others. However, at least in my experience, the system is very beatable; exams are largely based on proofs in the lectures and simple application of theorems, and they seldom make you really think on your feet. The assignments you do around the year tend to be more interesting, requiring some thought, and allowing you to take your time crafting nice solutions.
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    As far as becoming a maths teacher I know that there are other ways not involving a maths degree, though I'm not saying you shouldn't do a maths degree. I think you can do any degree then do some sort of conversion course and then the PGCE.
 
 
 
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