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    I started my A Levels in september. I do chemistry, biology and physics. However, I've found physics already to be miles harder than my other two options and I'll admit, I am struggling slightly. It got me thinking, am I capable enough for A Level Physics? In my GCSE's I got the equivalent of 1 A*, 7A's and a B. I am willing to put a lot of time and effort into studying and I want to get a A. I think the maths part of physics is what I am struggling with. If I am struggling slightly now, will I be in serious trouble at exam time? Any advice?
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    (Original post by space-oddity)
    I started my A Levels in september. I do chemistry, biology and physics. However, I've found physics already to be miles harder than my other two options and I'll admit, I am struggling slightly. It got me thinking, am I capable enough for A Level Physics? In my GCSE's I got the equivalent of 1 A*, 7A's and a B. I am willing to put a lot of time and effort into studying and I want to get a A. I think the maths part of physics is what I am struggling with. If I am struggling slightly now, will I be in serious trouble at exam time? Any advice?
    Just like Maths, it's about practise and repetition. If you don't get it at the start, keep going and practising til it clicks, and keep up the practise especially when the exams pass. You're capable if you put work in, and to be honest, you'll probably find it easier than Bio and Chem eventually because overall Physics isn't testing your knowledge/memory like Bio/Chem so much as your understanding.

    And yes, it is possible - I got a B at A Level and I barely passed Maths at GCSE
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    (Original post by space-oddity)
    I started my A Levels in september. I do chemistry, biology and physics. However, I've found physics already to be miles harder than my other two options and I'll admit, I am struggling slightly. It got me thinking, am I capable enough for A Level Physics? In my GCSE's I got the equivalent of 1 A*, 7A's and a B. I am willing to put a lot of time and effort into studying and I want to get a A. I think the maths part of physics is what I am struggling with. If I am struggling slightly now, will I be in serious trouble at exam time? Any advice?
    Well, without maths A level you might struggle with the maths in physics, especially in the second year when you start doing mechanics, circular motion and SHM and so on. However, that doesn't mean you can't do it.

    If you're struggling on the maths part, a good way is to take the equations that you're given and try to understand them specifically, do a ton of past papers and so on. Especially with physics, a lot of the maths questions are cut and paste. one you've done enough maths questions, you should know the steps to take to get the right answer for sure.

    It's good that you've spotted what you're struggling on now, since that means you can focus on the maths part of the course earlier on!
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    (Original post by CastCuraga)
    Just like Maths, it's about practise and repetition. If you don't get it at the start, keep going and practising til it clicks, and keep up the practise especially when the exams pass. You're capable if you put work in, and to be honest, you'll probably find it easier than Bio and Chem eventually because overall Physics isn't testing your knowledge/memory like Bio/Chem so much as your understanding.

    And yes, it is possible - I got a B at A Level and I barely passed Maths at GCSE
    I'm struggling w/ maths rn and because it's a new spec this year I'm struggling to find online worksheets which I love for practice. Any advice?
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    Print out so many revision resources until your school comes running to you begging you to stop.
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    (Original post by space-oddity)
    I started my A Levels in september. I do chemistry, biology and physics. However, I've found physics already to be miles harder than my other two options and I'll admit, I am struggling slightly. It got me thinking, am I capable enough for A Level Physics? In my GCSE's I got the equivalent of 1 A*, 7A's and a B. I am willing to put a lot of time and effort into studying and I want to get a A. I think the maths part of physics is what I am struggling with. If I am struggling slightly now, will I be in serious trouble at exam time? Any advice?
    I’m doing Maths without Physics too, because I didn’t know what to do as my 3rd and I enjoyed Physics. What part of the maths are you struggling with? Rearranging equations? SUVAT?
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    I'm struggling w/ maths rn and because it's a new spec this year I'm struggling to find online worksheets which I love for practice. Any advice?
    Hm...well, that is difficult, but the content itself likely hasn't changed - sciences don't tend to as much as humanities, at any rate. So, if you have a topic on, let's say, differential equations, you'd just need to look up worksheets for that topic.

    It might be something worth asking your teacher about actually, they'll be fairly likely to know if anyone.
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    I'm somewhat puzzled as to why you're doing physics without maths...in any case, there is no "prerequisite" to do physics, beyond a good mathematical problem solving ability. If you lack this then yes, you will struggle with physics (and if you pursue beyond A-level, probably chemistry, and if you pursue any science beyond undergraduate level, any STEM subject really...).

    As above physics like maths tends to require continual work, in doing small sets of problems every week (or even one or two every day) to keep your skills sharp - this includes during holiday periods. While you can do well enough without doing this, you will likely find it more difficult than you would otherwise, and possibly may find it harder to excel in the exams.

    Frankly I would suggest swapping it for Maths, as it's more relevant and useful than Physics with your other two, and you won't be expected to just "know" and be able to do the maths while they focus on the physical intuition as in physics - the entire point is they're teaching you the maths. Students normally take both Maths and Physics, both because they're required together for almost any related degree subject, and because doing A-level Maths will necessarily keep their mathematical skills at a suitable level (a higher level, actually) to do the maths in A-level Physics.
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    (Original post by WillPhillips)
    Print out so many revision resources until your school comes running to you begging you to stop.
    In my school we have £5 for printing on our account. Any over gets charged to our parents 😂
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I'm somewhat puzzled as to why you're doing physics without maths..
    Most people nowadays only do 3 subjects and don't want to do Physics as a degree, or like Physics but dislike Maths.

    Obviously Maths A Level helps loads with Physics, but unless it's changed dramatically since I did it, I don't think it's an absolute must-have...
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    (Original post by CastCuraga)
    Most people nowadays only do 3 subjects and don't want to do Physics as a degree, or like Physics but dislike Maths.

    Obviously Maths A Level helps loads with Physics, but unless it's changed dramatically since I did it, I don't think it's an absolute must-have...
    It's not required for A-level Physics, to it's eternal detriment, but as a result taking Physics without Maths adds nothing to an application, as it doesn't open the possibility of any course that you couldn't apply to with the pair of Biology/Chemistry and either Maths or some other subject. Thus, it's an odd choice which, as above, really doesn't add anything, and without the continuous mathematical work done in A-level Mathematics, it's very easy for students to fall behind and become rusty in their maths skills, as illustrated by the OP.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    It's not required for A-level Physics, to it's eternal detriment, but as a result taking Physics without Maths adds nothing to an application, as it doesn't open the possibility of any course that you couldn't apply to with the pair of Biology/Chemistry and either Maths or some other subject. Thus, it's an odd choice which, as above, really doesn't add anything, and without the continuous mathematical work done in A-level Mathematics, it's very easy for students to fall behind and become rusty in their maths skills, as illustrated by the OP.
    That's valid, although Physics is still used in other fields indirectly - we use it in Biomed a fair bit for things like haemodynamics or the small parts of biophysics. Mathematics would've been better if OP wanted to do a scientific subject though, you're correct in saying.
 
 
 
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