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    I’m currently in Year 11, and I want to study A Levels that will lead me into a career with the Forensics. Though, not the chemical aspect (just because I’m so bad at it) but the Biological aspect. Are the following a good combination?

    Biology, Psychology & Sociology

    I’m still debating on whether to switch Sociology with Criminology Diploma, but something tells me I should just have A Levels. Also, Maths isn’t exactly something I want to continue further, but it’d be something I keep doing if you know what I mean. Thanks!
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    Good options to go for. However, you might wanna do some research and look into chemistry a little bit more. There are certain unis who might prefer chemistry over other subjects purely because no matter what aspect you go into, having knowledge of chemistry is vital in forensics.
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    Good options to go for. However, you might wanna do some research and look into chemistry a little bit more. There are certain unis who might prefer chemistry over other subjects purely because no matter what aspect you go into, having knowledge of chemistry is vital in forensics.
    Damn. I was hoping to avoid chemistry. Well thanks anyway! I’ll be sure to do some more research
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    Depends what route into forensic science you want to take. Although undergrad forensic degrees are available, very few universities offer it (and those that do aren't the best, no Russell Group ones offer it).

    The best forensic science degree in the league tables is Keele (grades: BBC including Bio or Chemistry), which you would be fine for, however I'm unsure this is a good route into a career in forensics since BBC is a very low offer so likely isnt too 'competitive' if you get me?

    To my knowledge, since forensics is such a competitive field, most applicants do a degree such as biology, chemistry, biomed, biochem etc. so that they are more competitive applicants for jobs (plus, then you can do a masters in forensic science from a better university). To do this route, you would struggle with those A-Levels: most universities require two science subjects at A-Level to study a science (although many do accept psychology in lieu of a proper science) hence most people applying for Bio have Bio+Maths/Chemistry. However, you technically could apply for bio at a lot of places.

    Just bear in mind forensics is a competitive field, and heavily scientific (so I would really consider chemistry!) From what I've heard and quickly googled, most seem to access it via a science degree from a top university if you want a solid job.
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    (Original post by kilner)
    Depends what route into forensic science you want to take. Although undergrad forensic degrees are available, very few universities offer it (and those that do aren't the best, no Russell Group ones offer it).

    The best forensic science degree in the league tables is Keele (grades: BBC including Bio or Chemistry), which you would be fine for, however I'm unsure this is a good route into a career in forensics since BBC is a very low offer so likely isnt too 'competitive' if you get me?

    To my knowledge, since forensics is such a competitive field, most applicants do a degree such as biology, chemistry, biomed, biochem etc. so that they are more competitive applicants for jobs (plus, then you can do a masters in forensic science from a better university). To do this route, you would struggle with those A-Levels: most universities require two science subjects at A-Level to study a science (although many do accept psychology in lieu of a proper science) hence most people applying for Bio have Bio+Maths/Chemistry. However, you technically could apply for bio at a lot of places.

    Just bear in mind forensics is a competitive field, and heavily scientific (so I would really consider chemistry!) From what I've heard and quickly googled, most seem to access it via a science degree from a top university if you want a solid job.
    Alright, thanks! It’s just Chemistry is one of the sciences that I just don’t ‘enjoy’, but that’s probably because of my teachers. I’ll probably end up switching Sociology with Chemistry (that depends if I can get my grades up in chem tho). Thanks for the help!
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    As above, chemistry would be most useful. Moreover, the "biological" aspect is inherently linked to the "chemical" aspect, as biological forensics tend to focus on molecular genetics approaches - which is chemistry based. With the exception to an extent of human osteology and related areas, the biology will very much be molecular biology based which is as above inherently chemical.

    I would caution pursuing a degree in "forensic science" or similar, and advise to do a degree in a basic science (or related field of interest, such as possibly psychology or archaeology/anthropology - particularly biological/physical anthropology or human sciences, if you're interested in e.g. identification of human remains, more than DNA evidence etc) such as biology, biomedical science, chemistry, genetics, biochemistry, etc, etc. Such degrees may also offer options in forensic science/identification etc (particularly the biological anthropology/chemistry/anatomy type courses).

    You would be equally, if not better, qualified for such positions with those degrees, and also qualfiied to do something else in the likely event you aren't able to immediately enter that field. As above, it's very competitive now - the popularity of police procedural shows led to the creation of such "CSI Degrees" whose combined student cohorts number in the thousands, compared to a few hundred positions in the country - which is actually all that is required, as it's not a high growth sector.
 
 
 
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