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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    Your experience is in no way demonstrative of society as a whole though, even if you could definitely show that the divorce and broken family came from both working, rather than the other way round - Children of any race don't mostly come from broken homes.
    Oh, I assume statistical evidence that proves broken families are on the rise in western countries is is in no way demonstrative of society as a whole?
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    Yes.
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    (Original post by calsmith12)
    Don't be so patronising, the statistics back up my statement whereas your statement is baseless with no concrete evidence to back it up.

    Cohabiting couple families increased by 29.7% between 2004 and 2014, indigently at the same time where female parents started to become more 'independent"
    Link please?
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Link please?
    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...lds/2015-01-28
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    (Original post by Nebuchadnezzaṛ)
    Disagreeing with you is not insulting you.
    Aww bless, I wasn't talking to you.
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    (Original post by calsmith12)
    Oh, I assume statistical evidence that proves broken families are on the rise in western countries is is in no way demonstrative of society as a whole?
    Assuming you're referring to your other post you've ignored one basic fact: Cohabiting =/= broken home.
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    (Original post by Nirvana1989-1994)
    Aww bless, I wasn't talking to you.
    I didn't say you were.
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    Yes, I do.
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    Not necessarily. That’s what their grandparents are for
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    (Original post by Nebuchadnezzaṛ)
    I didn't say you were.
    Well then you know what to do next time.
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    (Original post by Nirvana1989-1994)
    Well then you know what to do next time.
    I don't.
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    I can't see why. It is OK for both parents to work and teh child to go to childcare. Lots of children do and are just fine

    (obviously, to a certain extent. If both parents have only 45 minutes a week to get with the children, then yes, something is wrong)
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    It has to be the mother, anything else is just insanity.
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    No.
    Completely different scenario, what about the kids who don't have both parents? Who's one parent has to go and earn a living. In my situation this is the case, and as the eldest child I effectively become back up parent. I do all the stuff my dad would be doing if he was at home all the time. I'm 17 almost 18 in full time education and yes I have to do things but it's so my dad can keep a roof over our heads. Kids are a full time thing, and as someone else mentioned not everyone can afford or have a nanny. I don't have any grandparents either, so I've just learnt to keep myself entertained really
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    Not necessarily. That’s what their grandparents are for
    Assuming the grandparents don't work and live nearby. When we were children, my mum's parents were still working and dad's parents weren't local enough for us to just to be dropped off and picked up. I have a friend whose adult children live quite far away; so whilst they do visit, looking after the grandchildren everyday isn't an option. And what happens when you're in your 70s and have health issues and can't look after your grandchildren?
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Assuming the grandparents don't work and live nearby. When we were children, my mum's parents were still working and dad's parents weren't local enough for us to just to be dropped off and picked up. I have a friend whose adult children live quite far away; so whilst they do visit, looking after the grandchildren everyday isn't an option. And what happens when you're in your 70s and have health issues and can't look after your grandchildren?
    My parents would be more than happy to quit work and look after my children. They’d live in the same house so travelling isn’t a problem. They’re relatively young and healthy. By the time they’ll start having health issues that’d severely restrict their mobility, my children would be old enough to not require as much care.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    My parents would be more than happy to quit work and look after my children. They’d live in the same house so travelling isn’t a problem. They’re relatively young and healthy. By the time they’ll start having health issues that’d severely restrict their mobility, my children would be old enough to not require as much care.
    And your parents would live on what?
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    I was lucky in the fact that my dad worked nights and my mum worked during the day when I was really young so usually I didn't have anyone else looking after me. When me and my brother got older, I think my dad changed jobs so we just went to an after school club for a couple of hours until someone could pick us up.
    We turned out fine, we never got attached to anyone but our parents. I think it's better if parents go to work and just sort out routines and options
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    And your parents would live on what?
    They’d live with me. Why is this such a shocking, implausible arrangement according to you? The South Asian extended family systems are different from the western nuclear family model. I’m not implying it’s the ideal arrangement for everyone, but that’s how me and my SO are going to do it. I don’t see what the big deal is :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    They’d live with me. Why is this such a shocking, implausible arrangement according to you? The South Asian extended family systems are different from the western nuclear family model. I’m not implying it’s the ideal arrangement for everyone, but that’s how me and my SO are going to do it. I don’t see what the big deal is :dontknow:
    That wasn't the question!
 
 
 
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