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    I’m currently studying maths, chemistry and psychology and have no idea what degrees I can do with them.
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    Anything except Modern languages, History, most English Literature courses, some Geography, Classics or Ancient Languages courses. Additionally without a foundation year most Physics and many Engineering disciplines would be limited. Some Bioscience courses would be limited - although usually Chemistry is a more important requirement missing for these, some may require both Chemistry and Biology.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Anything except Modern languages, History, most English Literature courses, some Geography, Classics or Ancient Languages courses. Additionally without a foundation year most Physics and many Engineering disciplines would be limited. Some Bioscience courses would be limited - although usually Chemistry is a more important requirement missing for these, some may require both Chemistry and Biology.
    That’s fine I’m not really interested in them. I’m just wondering what I can do because right now I have no idea.
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    That’s fine I’m not really interested in them. I’m just wondering what I can do because right now I have no idea.
    Well you can do the complement of that set...

    Chemistry, Maths, Computer Science, some Bioscience courses (especially biochemical/biomolecular oriented courses like Biochemistry or Pharmacology), some Engineering courses (mainly Chemical or Materials, but some have no physics rquirement for other disciplines - Exeter, while a poor engineering department, teaches the relevant content from scratch, and Southampton doesn't require Physics for Civil Engineering I believe), any social science courses (including Economics, as you have Maths), most humanities courses not mentioned above. Human Sciences at Oxford/UCL don't require Biology specifically to my knowledge, and Maths i helpful for those. Law has no subject requirements...

    Plus many more besides, and the innumerable combinations of those subjects and unusual permutations (such as Land Economy).
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    I’m currently studying maths, chemistry and psychology and have no idea what degrees I can do with them.
    We have the exact combination but I'm going for business psychology.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Well you can do the complement of that set...

    Chemistry, Maths, Computer Science, some Bioscience courses (especially biochemical/biomolecular oriented courses like Biochemistry or Pharmacology), some Engineering courses (mainly Chemical or Materials, but some have no physics rquirement for other disciplines - Exeter, while a poor engineering department, teaches the relevant content from scratch, and Southampton doesn't require Physics for Civil Engineering I believe), any social science courses (including Economics, as you have Maths), most humanities courses not mentioned above. Human Sciences at Oxford/UCL don't require Biology specifically to my knowledge, and Maths i helpful for those. Law has no subject requirements...

    Plus many more besides, and the innumerable combinations of those subjects and unusual permutations (such as Land Economy).
    Thanks for writing this out. I was going to do computer science a level but decided against it since I thought I’d rather do well in the three I have already chosen.
    I don’t really know much about it it just seems like something I’d like, and forensic science too.
    I just need ideas in what else I could do, which you’ve helped with so thanks. It’s so confusing coz no one really explains the whole uni thing, I still don’t understand how many years and stuff you need to do and what you need to do before you finish.
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    (Original post by strontium-)
    We have the exact combination but I'm going for business psychology.
    Really?? I keep searching for who else is doing what I’m doing so I can see what they’re deciding to do.

    I actually never heard of business psychology, but I’m not surprised since there are so many random courses.

    Unfortunately I really dislike business so looks like that’s not for me.
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    Really?? I keep searching for who else is doing what I’m doing so I can see what they’re deciding to do.

    I actually never heard of business psychology, but I’m not surprised since there are so many random courses.

    Unfortunately I really dislike business so looks like that’s not for me.
    Try this:

    https://university.which.co.uk/a-level-explorer
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    Really?? I keep searching for who else is doing what I’m doing so I can see what they’re deciding to do.

    I actually never heard of business psychology, but I’m not surprised since there are so many random courses.

    Unfortunately I really dislike business so looks like that’s not for me.
    Yeah same, I guess our combo isn't as popular? idk lol.
    Yeah it's not really a course that's very well known, but I like it. Keep researching with your subject combo you have quite a range of courses to choose from
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    Thanks for writing this out. I was going to do computer science a level but decided against it since I thought I’d rather do well in the three I have already chosen.
    I don’t really know much about it it just seems like something I’d like, and forensic science too.
    I just need ideas in what else I could do, which you’ve helped with so thanks. It’s so confusing coz no one really explains the whole uni thing, I still don’t understand how many years and stuff you need to do and what you need to do before you finish.
    I'd recommend looking through some of the resources on the UCAS site - they have a lot of helpful comments about choosing a degree to apply to and tools to help you do so, as well as just describing the process.

    Beyond that, you don't need to have taken CS/IT or even have any programming experience to apply to CS at uni - most students haven't. The main prerequisite is good maths ability and background.

    For Forensic Science, it's advisable to do a degree in a basic science (i.e. biology, chemistry, biochemistry, biomedical sciences) or a relevant other area (such as psychology, archaeology/anthropology or human sciences) and then go into the profession from there. You will be just as, if not more qualified for such positions, and better positioned to pursue other areas in the event that you don't immediately get a role in your desired area - which given how relatively few forensic positions there are, is entirely possible.
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    I’ve been on this before, I wish the suggestions were more specific though.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Well you can do the complement of that set...

    Chemistry, Maths, Computer Science, some Bioscience courses (especially biochemical/biomolecular oriented courses like Biochemistry or Pharmacology), some Engineering courses (mainly Chemical or Materials, but some have no physics rquirement for other disciplines - Exeter, while a poor engineering department, teaches the relevant content from scratch, and Southampton doesn't require Physics for Civil Engineering I believe), any social science courses (including Economics, as you have Maths), most humanities courses not mentioned above. Human Sciences at Oxford/UCL don't require Biology specifically to my knowledge, and Maths i helpful for those. Law has no subject requirements...

    Plus many more besides, and the innumerable combinations of those subjects and unusual permutations (such as Land Economy).
    Btw do Computer Science degree require Chemistry? My subjects are Maths, Computer Science, Physics and Chemistry. I am just planning on dropping Chemistry.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I'd recommend looking through some of the resources on the UCAS site - they have a lot of helpful comments about choosing a degree to apply to and tools to help you do so, as well as just describing the process.

    Beyond that, you don't need to have taken CS/IT or even have any programming experience to apply to CS at uni - most students haven't. The main prerequisite is good maths ability and background.

    For Forensic Science, it's advisable to do a degree in a basic science (i.e. biology, chemistry, biochemistry, biomedical sciences) or a relevant other area (such as psychology, archaeology/anthropology or human sciences) and then go into the profession from there. You will be just as, if not more qualified for such positions, and better positioned to pursue other areas in the event that you don't immediately get a role in your desired area - which given how relatively few forensic positions there are, is entirely possible.
    Ok thanks, I’ll look into that. So does that I shouldn’t do forensics? You seem to know a lot about this stuff, I’m wondering could you explain how picking a degree works - like how many you can do at once and if you just do one and can get a job after that? Seriously no one explains this stuff and it’s so confusing coz I did try to search it all up, with no results.
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    (Original post by kundanad)
    Btw do Computer Science degree require Chemistry? My subjects are Maths, Computer Science, Physics and Chemistry. I am just planning on dropping Chemistry.
    CS requirements vary. Almost all only require Maths, although many prefer a science background generally as well. A couple require AS or A-level Further Maths. Physics is useful, although by no means required, and Chemistry is not required and doesn't convey any particular advantage.

    (Original post by tearling17)
    Ok thanks, I’ll look into that. So does that I shouldn’t do forensics? You seem to know a lot about this stuff, I’m wondering could you explain how picking a degree works - like how many you can do at once and if you just do one and can get a job after that? Seriously no one explains this stuff and it’s so confusing coz I did try to search it all up, with no results.
    Wanting to pursue forensic science as a career is fine - but I would steer clear of so-called "CSI degrees". The profession existed before the degree - that should tell you something. You don't need that degree to become a forensic scientist, but what you can do with it outside of that realm is more limited than other related degrees that are broader in scope.

    You only do one degree at a time. Your degree may have more than one subject, however - such as a joint honours, which often has two (i.e. Chemistry and Biology; Mathematics with Economics) or a combined honours which has several (PPE, Natural Sciences, Social and Political Sciences etc). The specific content of any given degree is probably different to a similarly named one, although STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) courses tend to be more similar than different, both due to accreditation requirements and also the nature of the subject requiring particular background in a certain set of subjects.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    CS requirements vary. Almost all only require Maths, although many prefer a science background generally as well. A couple require AS or A-level Further Maths. Physics is useful, although by no means required, and Chemistry is not required and doesn't convey any particular advantage.



    Wanting to pursue forensic science as a career is fine - but I would steer clear of so-called "CSI degrees". The profession existed before the degree - that should tell you something. You don't need that degree to become a forensic scientist, but what you can do with it outside of that realm is more limited than other related degrees that are broader in scope.

    You only do one degree at a time. Your degree may have more than one subject, however - such as a joint honours, which often has two (i.e. Chemistry and Biology; Mathematics with Economics) or a combined honours which has several (PPE, Natural Sciences, Social and Political Sciences etc). The specific content of any given degree is probably different to a similarly named one, although STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) courses tend to be more similar than different, both due to accreditation requirements and also the nature of the subject requiring particular background in a certain set of subjects.
    Oh okay thats no problem then. Thank you
    Btw what about CIE General Paper as we have it complusory subject in our A levels. Does many universities consider Gp grades while applying? I got C in GP. Does that affect my entry?
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    (Original post by kundanad)
    Oh okay thats no problem then. Thank you
    Btw what about CIE General Paper as we have it complusory subject in our A levels. Does many universities consider Gp grades while applying? I got C in GP. Does that affect my entry?
    Normally General Studies, Critical Thinking, and similar aren't used to make offers by the top universities. Some may use it as a "tie breaker" but honestly the odds of that happening are so unlikely that in practice they'll just ignore it all together.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    CS requirements vary. Almost all only require Maths, although many prefer a science background generally as well. A couple require AS or A-level Further Maths. Physics is useful, although by no means required, and Chemistry is not required and doesn't convey any particular advantage.



    Wanting to pursue forensic science as a career is fine - but I would steer clear of so-called "CSI degrees". The profession existed before the degree - that should tell you something. You don't need that degree to become a forensic scientist, but what you can do with it outside of that realm is more limited than other related degrees that are broader in scope.

    You only do one degree at a time. Your degree may have more than one subject, however - such as a joint honours, which often has two (i.e. Chemistry and Biology; Mathematics with Economics) or a combined honours which has several (PPE, Natural Sciences, Social and Political Sciences etc). The specific content of any given degree is probably different to a similarly named one, although STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) courses tend to be more similar than different, both due to accreditation requirements and also the nature of the subject requiring particular background in a certain set of subjects.
    What’s the best type of degree to do?
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    What’s the best type of degree to do?
    There is no "best type". You should do the subject or subjects that interest you the most.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    There is no "best type". You should do the subject or subjects that interest you the most.
    No I meant the best type as in a single or double etc. Not the subject, I know you should choose what you would want to do.
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    (Original post by tearling17)
    No I meant the best type as in a single or double etc. Not the subject, I know you should choose what you would want to do.
    The same advice applies. If you absolutely wanted to nitpick, I'd suggest maybe avoiding mixing very unrelated subjects - which is usually not possible anyway - like English Literature and Pure Mathematics or something. This is mainly because you end up without enough focused preparation to pursue specialist roles in either area.
    But something like Chemistry with Maths, Social Policy and Criminology, History and Ancient History, PPE, Natural Sciences, etc, etc is perfectly fine.

    You should also be aware of any professional or accreditation requirements mainly for e.g. engineering, law, and psychology as some combined/joint honours courses don't satisfy these criteria. It's worth noting that Engineering at Oxbridge, and Natural Sciences at Cambridge, normally fulfill any relevant accreditation criteria. Other such courses may or may not however.
 
 
 
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