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    I'm currently doing some research for my EPQ essay which is about the causes of postnatal depression and I wanted to know if anyone had completed any research on postnatal depression and if they had spoken to any professionals. I have found some books to read, I've spoken to someone who has suffered from postnatal depression and have done quite a bit of research but was hoping to find out what other students who have researched along same general idea!

    This was recommended to me by my supervisor as previous students have benefitted from it! I'm not asking anyone to do the work for me I was just wanting to know what else is out there

    If you don't know anything about postnatal depression I would rather not have an answer
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    First of all, the whole point behind an EPQ is for you to do this independently. Asking other people to name-drop contacts and do half of the work for you will not work out in your favour...I'm just saying :rolleyes:.

    Secondly, I don't really know much about your topic so I can't help you with the details but I also did an EPQ and I have gained many professional contacts through it. I really went out of my way when I was in my research stage and I emailed over 100 people/organisations at least. Only a handful came back to me but they gave me more than enough help for my EPQ and I still keep in touch with most of them now. Here are the following things that helped me when I was doing my research:

    1. Go find as many online news articles as you can about your subject and email whoever wrote them (usually a journalist or an expert on this matter). These are busy people and not all of them have the time to respond which is why you need to ensure that you ask the right questions in order to retrieve the right information.
    2. BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS. Go to as many different library's as possible to see if they have books on your topic. You don't have to read the whole thing so just pick out what you need. After you do that, check the bibliography at the back. You'd be surprised as to how helpful they are in terms of accessing new sources etc. I can't emphasise this enough!!!!
    3. There is a course that teaches you about postnatal depression. I'm not saying you should take the course but I strongly suggest that you email whoever is in charge of it if you want to speak to someone who holds knowledge on the subject.
    4. Research any charities that help women that have suffered/are suffering from postnatal depression. Contact them via phone, email etc.
    5. In my view, I see someone who has experienced postnatal depression as a professional on the subject anyways as they know what it is like first-hand. You don't necessarily have to have a fancy qualification to be able to hold a lot of knowledge on a subject. Besides, the professionals take their research from these exact women so if anything, finding someone that has experienced postnatal depression themselves is your best bet.

    I hope this has helped. Good luck
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    (Original post by g5924)
    First of all, the whole point behind an EPQ is for you to do this independently. Asking other people to name-drop contacts and do half of the work for you will not work out in your favour...I'm just saying :rolleyes:.

    Secondly, I don't really know much about your topic so I can't help you with the details but I also did an EPQ and I have gained many professional contacts through it. I really went out of my way when I was in my research stage and I emailed over 100 people/organisations at least. Only a handful came back to me but they gave me more than enough help for my EPQ and I still keep in touch with most of them now. Here are the following things that helped me when I was doing my research:

    1. Go find as many online news articles as you can about your subject and email whoever wrote them (usually a journalist or an expert on this matter). These are busy people and not all of them have the time to respond which is why you need to ensure that you ask the right questions in order to retrieve the right information.
    2. BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS. Go to as many different library's as possible to see if they have books on your topic. You don't have to read the whole thing so just pick out what you need. After you do that, check the bibliography at the back. You'd be surprised as to how helpful they are in terms of accessing new sources etc. I can't emphasise this enough!!!!
    3. There is a course that teaches you about postnatal depression. I'm not saying you should take the course but I strongly suggest that you email whoever is in charge of it if you want to speak to someone who holds knowledge on the subject.
    4. Research any charities that help women that have suffered/are suffering from postnatal depression. Contact them via phone, email etc.
    5. In my view, I see someone who has experienced postnatal depression as a professional on the subject anyways as they know what it is like first-hand. You don't necessarily have to have a fancy qualification to be able to hold a lot of knowledge on a subject. Besides, the professionals take their research from these exact women so if anything, finding someone that has experienced postnatal depression themselves is your best bet.

    I hope this has helped. Good luck
    You haven't really helped, my supervisor has already told me all of this! I'm not asking for other people to do the work for me, I was recommended by my supervisor to speak to other students about the subject
 
 
 
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