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    Could someone please explain why:

    Chlorine will displace bromide and iodide ions from solution?

    Why Bromine will displace iodide ions from solution, but not chloride ions?

    Why iodide cannot displace either bromide or chloride ions from solution?

    I have tried researching this elsewhere but am still having difficulty understanding the concepts...

    Thanks!
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    The electronegativity of the halogens decreases down the group.
    Chlorine has a higher electronegativity than bromine, bromine has a higher electronegativity than iodine etc.
    An atom with a greater electronegativity can displace one with a lower electronegativity
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    (Original post by DhylanP - CRGS)
    Could someone please explain why:

    Chlorine will displace bromide and iodide ions from solution?

    Why Bromine will displace iodide ions from solution, but not chloride ions?

    Why iodide cannot displace either bromide or chloride ions from solution?

    I have tried researching this elsewhere but am still having difficulty understanding the concepts...

    Thanks!
    This is because chlorine is the most reactive, then bromine, then iodine, the reason for this is because all of these atoms want to gain an electron to complete their shells and chlorine has the least shells meaning it is easier for its nucleus to attract an electron whereas bromine has more shells so the electron will be further away from the nucleus, and iodine has even more shells so the electron it is trying to gain is further away from the nucleus (also due to electron shell shielding meaning the more shells the smaller the attractive force). Leading to chlorine being more reactive than bromine and iodine, and bromine being more reactive than iodine. We also know that a more reactive element will displace a less reactive element which is why this happens.
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    Hey guys, thanks for answering!

    I understand what you are saying, but my thinking is that how can Chlorine displace iodide ions when iodide ions are the most reactive out of all the halides?
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    (Original post by DhylanP - CRGS)
    Hey guys, thanks for answering!

    I understand what you are saying, but my thinking is that how can Chlorine displace iodide ions when iodide ions are the most reactive out of all the halides?
    Using this line of thinking, if iodide ions are the "most reactive", then we would expect them most likely to take part in (redox) reactions?

    Hence they are the most readily oxidised back into their elemental form, i.e 2I- -->I2
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    Minds gone west here
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    (Original post by DhylanP - CRGS)
    Hey guys, thanks for answering!

    I understand what you are saying, but my thinking is that how can Chlorine displace iodide ions when iodide ions are the most reactive out of all the halides?
    Think about the atomic structure of iodine and chlorine, draw them both out if needed, then think which one is more reactive and why.
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    I'm pretty sure I've got it now. Sounds like I lost the plot for a while there! LOL! Thanks for answering guys!
 
 
 
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