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    So I've always struggled with writing introductions. I know roughly what to put in them (key terms definitions, link to context and generally setting up the argument of the essay) however, I never know how to start them or how to word them! Any advice on how to start? For example, I have an essay to write on marriage in the winter's tale and have no clue how to start.

    One of my teachers also says that I have trouble setting out the argument at the start and then linking all the way through the essay (so its a 'lot of little arguments and not one large one') . Tips on how to also do this??

    Many thanks, Emily xx
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    (Original post by ewarner2000)
    So I've always struggled with writing introductions. I know roughly what to put in them (key terms definitions, link to context and generally setting up the argument of the essay) however, I never know how to start them or how to word them! Any advice on how to start? For example, I have an essay to write on marriage in the winter's tale and have no clue how to start.

    One of my teachers also says that I have trouble setting out the argument at the start and then linking all the way through the essay (so its a 'lot of little arguments and not one large one' . Tips on how to also do this??

    Many thanks, Emily xx
    You might want to check this out.

    Essentially you just have to lay out what you're going to argue in the essay, which becomes easier if you have one coherent argument running through the essay. For example, if you're going to write about several contradictory depictions of marriage in the play and conclude by saying that it is presented as multifaceted and sometimes unworthy of the social veneration it is given (I'm not sure if this is the case since I'm not familiar enough with the play :lol:), say so! One thing I would suggest is that you plan out your essay before you start writing an intro, so that you know what argument you're going to make and can describe it in your intro.

    As for linking throughout the essay, the point about planning still holds. Another good thing to do to tie the essay together is to link back to the question at the end of each paragraph ("as shown by [...], marriage is presented [thus]"). Use your conclusion to pull all your arguments together; if you've made a different observation in each paragraph, your conclusion is a chance to bring together your observations and lay out how they influence each other ("although [...] shows that Shakespeare somehow presents marriage as [...], it is also sometimes portrayed [...] and hence the audience gets the overarching impression that [...]").
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    (Original post by Sonechka)
    You might want to check this out.

    Essentially you just have to lay out what you're going to argue in the essay, which becomes easier if you have one coherent argument running through the essay. For example, if you're going to write about several contradictory depictions of marriage in the play and conclude by saying that it is presented as multifaceted and sometimes unworthy of the social veneration it is given (I'm not sure if this is the case since I'm not familiar enough with the play :lol:), say so! One thing I would suggest is that you plan out your essay before you start writing an intro, so that you know what argument you're going to make and can describe it in your intro.

    As for linking throughout the essay, the point about planning still holds. Another good thing to do to tie the essay together is to link back to the question at the end of each paragraph ("as shown by [...], marriage is presented [thus]". Use your conclusion to pull all your arguments together; if you've made a different observation in each paragraph, your conclusion is a chance to bring together your observations and lay out how they influence each other ("although [...] shows that Shakespeare somehow presents marriage as [...], it is also sometimes portrayed [...] and hence the audience gets the overarching impression that [...]".
    Thank you! Xx
 
 
 
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