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    (Original post by niteninja1)
    All of the lecturers at my uni are required to have a PhD I though that was a standard
    No not at all and you might need to do a fact check on who's actually teaching you. Most lecturers are qualified to master's level or depending on the subject area may be an industry specialist instead. If you are an undergraduate I would bet money that 90 percent of the people teaching you do not have a PhD. It's not needed for lower level studying like undergraduate degrees to be honest, you do not have the depth of knowledge to require a higher level of teaching. Which university are you at?
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    (Original post by Naomibill)
    No not at all and you might need to do a fact check on who's actually teaching you. Most lecturers are qualified to master's level or depending on the subject area may be an industry specialist instead. If you are an undergraduate I would bet money that 90 percent of the people teaching you do not have a PhD. It's not needed for lower level studying like undergraduate degrees to be honest, you do not have the depth of knowledge to require a higher level of teaching. Which university are you at?
    I have 5lectures and I know they all have doctorates
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    You pay for the degree you get at the end; universities are businesses. If you genuinely feel like you could do it yourself, you could do an OU degree. It's much cheaper
    (Original post by Spratty)
    It has been two weeks of university, and although I am enjoying my course i would not justify the cost at 9250. In every lecture it has been powerpoint after powerpoint. Honestly I could self-teach myself most of the content that they have taught us in the first year.

    They have literally no excuse to be charging students the absolute top rate of tuiton fees, especially when the teaching methods are sub par. It's ridiculous.
    It's much worse for us internationals. They expect us to pay anywhere around 18 -23k.

    Considering this, if they only asked me for 9250, I would pay it happily.
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    (Original post by niteninja1)
    I have 5lectures and I know they all have doctorates
    A professor might talk for an hour once a week to 200 students but the rest of the work, workshops, seminars, marking essays, tutorials, answering questions etc will be done by someone else who probably will not have a doctorate. It is those people who are really teaching you. Professors do not have the time to do those things because they do research and run departments. This is the way universities work.
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    (Original post by CuriousGuy777)
    It's much worse for us internationals. They expect us to pay anywhere around 18 -23k.

    Considering this, if they only asked me for 9250, I would pay it happily.
    It's crazy, I don't know why anyone would pay that on top of accommodation and living costs, visas etc! But I guess the degrees gained are more valued abroad than in the UK? I don't know how internationals afford it either
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    It's crazy, I don't know why anyone would pay that on top of accommodation and living costs, visas etc! But I guess the degrees gained are more valued abroad than in the UK? I don't know how internationals afford it either
    Usually their families can afford or they take up loans. In some cases relatives help too.

    I think that if it's from a top uni like Oxbridge,Lse, UCL or imperial then it has quite a high value as long as it's not a degree in a useless subject eg Gender studies or something like that. If it's from anywhere else then its probably not worth it imo.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Many of you are being incredibly naive. You dont just pay for x number of teaching hours.

    You pay for .... the library and all its books/staff/IT facilities, your teaching rooms/lecture theatres/labs, refectories/cafes/common rooms, gyms/sports halls/playing fields, medical/counselling/health facilities, an accommodation service, a careers service, an IT service, Faculty/Dept/School offices and all the staff, cleaners/porters/security staff - and all the thousand and one other things you would expect there to be. Because all of you would whinge like crazy if these things were NOT there, right?
    You have to pay for accommodation seperately so that's a huge extra cost..
    You have to pay for the gym membership and food in the cafe..
    You may have to buy books..
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    (Original post by CuriousGuy777)
    It's much worse for us internationals. They expect us to pay anywhere around 18 -23k.

    Considering this, if they only asked me for 9250, I would pay it happily.
    I've just paid Imperial £27,750 for my son this year. Yes, it is worth it. Oxbridge is more, although non-London living costs would probably more than offset the extra.

    Whether some other universities are is debatable IMO.
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    (Original post by Poooky)
    It's crazy, I don't know why anyone would pay that on top of accommodation and living costs, visas etc! But I guess the degrees gained are more valued abroad than in the UK? I don't know how internationals afford it either
    I'm British, but have lived in California for the last 10 years. My son is now at Imperial. Working in Silicon Valley pays me more than enough extra to cover international fees, although it's a bit galling, as I've already paid more tax in the UK than most will pay in a lifetime.

    P.S. Thanks for the Brexit discount ..
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    (Original post by Naomibill)
    No not at all and you might need to do a fact check on who's actually teaching you. Most lecturers are qualified to master's level or depending on the subject area may be an industry specialist instead. If you are an undergraduate I would bet money that 90 percent of the people teaching you do not have a PhD. It's not needed for lower level studying like undergraduate degrees to be honest, you do not have the depth of knowledge to require a higher level of teaching. Which university are you at?
    I can't imagine what kind of craphole institutions have influenced you to make such a sweeping generalisation.

    Agreed with the not needing incredible qualifications point, but it varies a lot depending on the course and the module.
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    Probably best stating that a vast majority of university is self directed, with the 'lectures' acting as more of a overview into the topics you'll be covering. Or at least it should be. You turn up, get an overview of the topics, use the background reading material for more depth, and hassle the lecturer til he feels sorry for himself if you struggle with topics.

    For the most part, on what you receive it's hardly justified, but that's just how the business world works, lecturer side it does justify every dime they get, but for some universities I wouldn't even give management anything if I had a choice in the matter. Some lecturers IMO don't get paid enough bearing in mind the crap they deal with in some places. Quite a shame you have the death by powerpoint treatment though.

    In any circumstance, the being spoonfed isn't an expectation for me as I like the overviews. But I'd least like a unique and engaging module delivery, something that keeps me from falling asleep, and some knowledge that you probably wouldn't find in many books, if any for that matter (Insight into their research if it coincides with ones own interest).

    Just take comfort in knowing that it isn't you that directly pays for it, and you likely won't pay back the full amount anytime soon, if ever, bearing in mind the interest rates.
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    I've just paid Imperial £27,750 for my son this year. Yes, it is worth it. Oxbridge is more, although non-London living costs would probably more than offset the extra.

    Whether some other universities are is debatable IMO.
    For imperial i agree that it is.

    Does that include accommodation and living costs or just tuition?
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    I'm British, but have lived in California for the last 10 years. My son is now at Imperial. Working in Silicon Valley pays me more than enough extra to cover international fees, although it's a bit galling, as I've already paid more tax in the UK than most will pay in a lifetime.
    The ivy league, Stanford, MIT, UChicago and UCs like UC Berkeley and UCLA(also USC) and other similar universities are great too. And they tend to give out a good amount of aid aswell.
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    (Original post by CuriousGuy777)
    The ivy league, Stanford, MIT, UChicago and UCs like UC Berkeley and UCLA(also USC) and other similar universities are great too. And they tend to give out a good amount of aid aswell.
    The UCs are cheaper, but a Master's is 6 years, so it works out about the same. The private universities cost more per year (without aid), and all require high GPA and EC hoop-jumping. UK universities offer far more focused courses and only really care about APs, so are better for students that focus on a smaller range of subjects that they enjoy. In the UK, you get to do 'A' levels from 16, but in the US, you're still doing at least English and History / Economics, / Civics etc, regardless of if it interests you.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I can't imagine what kind of craphole institutions have influenced you to make such a sweeping generalisation.

    Agreed with the not needing incredible qualifications point, but it varies a lot depending on the course and the module.
    Russell group, all you need is a master's, PhD is desirable not essential. Read a job advert if you don't believe me lol
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    (Original post by Naomibill)
    Russell group, all you need is a master's, PhD is desirable not essential. Read a job advert if you don't believe me lol
    It's effectively essential, the only way you could get around it is if you have otherwise shown yourself to be an impeccable researcher. I know one professor at my University who doesn't have a PhD, and that guy is a research powerhouse.
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    If you don't that it is work the price don't study there. Surely you'd only purchase a unit of something (here, its education) if the marginal utility you get from consuming it is equal to or above the price?
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    (Original post by Naomibill)
    Russell group, all you need is a master's, PhD is desirable not essential. Read a job advert if you don't believe me lol
    What you are saying is akin to "90% of Oxford students have AAA at A-level because that's the standard offer for humanities". Minimum requirements =/= actual qualifications.

    Besides, it's one thing to have your classes/seminars taught by a PhD student (who yes, doesn't technically have their PhD yet), and another for the lectures to be taught by PhDs. Lectures are taught by faculty most of the time, with the occasional outsider dropping in where their vocational experience is relevant. To become a member of faculty (i.e. to get a tenured position), you pretty much need a PhD or equivalent, plus a billion other things nowadays. But no, that reality is not literally reflected in the words "PhD desirable".

    I'd be interested in seeing which faculty and which uni inspired you to make that remark.
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    So I study computer science. In my case I have
    5lecturers who all have PHD’s
    a tutor who just happens to be a lecture that isn’t one of my 5 so another PHD.

    I have 12 hours of lectures plus 6hours of labs.
    The labs have the lecturer of that module so lecturer1 does lab1plus 4 GTA’s who aid the lecturer with 1 to 1 support but the lab is still run by the lecturer.
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    (Original post by Naomibill)
    No not at all and you might need to do a fact check on who's actually teaching you. Most lecturers are qualified to master's level or depending on the subject area may be an industry specialist instead. If you are an undergraduate I would bet money that 90 percent of the people teaching you do not have a PhD. It's not needed for lower level studying like undergraduate degrees to be honest, you do not have the depth of knowledge to require a higher level of teaching. Which university are you at?
    All of my tutors are established in their fields, they all have PhD's.
 
 
 
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