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unconditional offer from uni but ended up with DDD at A level Watch

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    (Original post by liam189)
    i didnt why
    Because if you had had extenuating circumstances, future firms would usually have taken it into account. As you didn't, you're likely to have an uphill struggle to persuade firms to consider you for a training contract (because other candidates will look better on paper than you) unless it turns out to be a complete blip in your academic results.

    J-SP is the person whose view you really want.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    Because if you had had extenuating circumstances, future firms would usually have taken it into account. As you didn't, you're likely to have an uphill struggle to persuade firms to consider you for a training contract (because other candidates will look better on paper than you) unless it turns out to be a complete blip in your academic results.

    J-SP is the person whose view you really want.
    ohhh i see i think i got to complacent when i got the unconditional offer and my results started to take a dip
    i got 3 As a AS level
    i may try and get a lot of experience and try to get a first to put me in a very good position for after uni but i would be aware that my A levels are really bad but wasnt sure how bad of a disadavantage it would put me in
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    (Original post by liam189)
    If one had recieved a unconditional offer from a RG uni
    for law but then ****ed up at A level and got DDD would you resit the year or just go into the first year of uni and forget about those A level they had got
    You're screwed for grad jobs/Interships.

    For banking, many use to ask for AAB for grad jobs, they don't now, but it's kind of an. unwritten preference.

    I'd go in to uni and resit simultaneously; if you get 2:1 at the end, it's all good.
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    (Original post by liam189)
    I think as i got a unconditional offer and i knew of this offer very early on my form sort of droped of towards the summer and as i knew whatever mark i got i would be going to uni I got AAA at AS level which i was very pleased at and hoped to replicate or do better at A level but that unconditional offer from the uni i wanted to go made me very complacent more than anything looking back at my A level i would do stuff very differently
    At A level i did history maths science biology
    It has really made me think as to if i am really ready for my course and i know for law some firms look a A levels a lot
    Based solely on that, I'd say go to uni but learn from the mistakes you made in your second year of sixth form/college. Obviously you have the potential if you were able to get AAA the year before but learn not to lose motivation (which could be easy to do at uni). The majority of your A-levels are not similar to law either so content wise, you would probably have a completely different experience.

    In terms of the course, does the uni you plan to go to provide a of variety in terms of the elective (optional) modules you can pick?This way you can try to tailor the course to your interests.

    Also most companies do not care about what course you studied as long as you did well so if you do graduate in law and realise you don't want a career in that field then there are plenty of other options.
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    A-levels do still get looked at quite heavily. Majority of firms will have a BBB to AAB minimum requirement.

    I don't think resitting A-levels necessarily solves the problem though. Many of these firms who have these requirements are looking at your first attempt at sitting them, although some will consider the resits and appreciate the persistence. But that's going to be a minority.

    The fact there are no mitigating circumstances and all three grades are Ds is going to be pretty concerning to firms though.

    Areas outside of law are far more open minded about A-levels grades - nearly three quarters of graduate employers do not have a minimum A-level requirement, it's just unfortunate law still relies heavily on them.

    Usually I would say don't bother resitting and just focus on getting a good degree result, but that's typically to people who have just missed the ABB mark. Where your grades are so low, and if you are definitely focused on a legal career it might be a good idea to resit. However, if ultimately you are a doing a law degree and want to get into anything like the public sector/other professional services, then the resits won't be necessary.
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    (Original post by r-t)
    Based solely on that, I'd say go to uni but learn from the mistakes you made in your second year of sixth form/college. Obviously you have the potential if you were able to get AAA the year before but learn not to lose motivation (which could be easy to do at uni). The majority of your A-levels are not similar to law either so content wise, you would probably have a completely different experience.

    In terms of the course, does the uni you plan to go to provide a of variety in terms of the elective (optional) modules you can pick?This way you can try to tailor the course to your interests.

    Also most companies do not care about what course you studied as long as you did well so if you do graduate in law and realise you don't want a career in that field then there are plenty of other options.
    yea i will defiently learn from me being to complacent because of the unconditional offer and yeah it has a wide range of choices for optional modules and ohhh i could always resit the A levels while at uni ? i see hopefully my degree with extra cirrcular stuff and experience will put me in a v good position
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    A-levels do still get looked at quite heavily. Majority of firms will have a BBB to AAB minimum requirement.

    I don't think resitting A-levels necessarily solves the problem though. Many of these firms who have these requirements are looking at your first attempt at sitting them, although some will consider the resits and appreciate the persistence. But that's going to be a minority.

    The fact there are no mitigating circumstances and all three grades are Ds is going to be pretty concerning to firms though.

    Areas outside of law are far more open minded about A-levels grades - nearly three quarters of graduate employers do not have a minimum A-level requirement, it's just unfortunate law still relies heavily on them.

    Usually I would say don't bother resitting and just focus on getting a good degree result, but that's typically to people who have just missed the ABB mark. Where your grades are so low, and if you are definitely focused on a legal career it might be a good idea to resit. However, if ultimately you are a doing a law degree and want to get into anything like the public sector/other professional services, then the resits won't be necessary.
    ohhhh i see as i thohght the minimum requirements would be something along those lines i was considering resitting 1/2 A levels at uni but if that is the case i dont really see a point
    As i said before i think i got very complacent when i recieved the unconditional offer from the uni i wanted to go to so i think that would be the main reason where i ****ed up at my A levels
    and in your opinion would experience and extra-curriclar aactivities and a first for example not make up for my poor A levels
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    (Original post by liam189)
    ohhhh i see as i thohght the minimum requirements would be something along those lines i was considering resitting 1/2 A levels at uni but if that is the case i dont really see a point
    As i said before i think i got very complacent when i recieved the unconditional offer from the uni i wanted to go to so i think that would be the main reason where i ****ed up at my A levels
    and in your opinion would experience and extra-curriclar aactivities and a first for example not make up for my poor A levels
    It could make up for it, but it won't be as black and white as that. Plus you've got the get the grades and experience, which isn't necessarily as easy as it seems. Plus the rest of your application form would have to be near perfect so that there were not any other concerns.

    Even then some law firms will not consider you at all where you don't meet their minimum criteria.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It could make up for it, but it won't be as black and white as that. Plus you've got the get the grades and experience, which isn't necessarily as easy as it seems. Plus the rest of your application form would have to be near perfect so that there were not any other concerns.

    Even then some law firms will not consider you at all where you don't meet their minimum criteria.
    ohhhh i see thankyou for your help
    at the time i was so pleased about my unconditional offer but now looking back it was probably paramount to my downfall at A levels

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    (Original post by liam189)
    ohhhh i see thankyou for your help
    at the time i was so pleased about my unconditional offer but now looking back it was probably paramount to my downfall at A levels

    I think were I in your position and I really thought I might want a career in law, then I would defer university for a year, and go back to school to retake all of my A'levels. Then absolutely blitz them, and hope that I could persuade law firms in the future that I made a very silly mistake (... but look, I showed what I could do when I got three A*s the following year).

    If I didn't want a career in law then I'd probably go to university and forget about the A'levels.

    But I find it difficult to think that anyone could retake A'levels and do a degree course at the same time, whilst performing to the best of their abilities in both.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    I think were I in your position and I really thought I might want a career in law, then I would defer university for a year, and go back to school to retake all of my A'levels. Then absolutely blitz them, and hope that I could persuade law firms in the future that I made a very silly mistake (... but look, I showed what I could do when I got three A*s the following year).

    If I didn't want a career in law then I'd probably go to university and forget about the A'levels.

    But I find it difficult to think that anyone could retake A'levels and do a degree course at the same time, whilst performing to the best of their abilities in both.
    I'd agree with this - although I suspect they are already committed to the course and would need to see if the university/student finance would allow them to defer at no or little cost.
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    You're screwed for grad jobs/Interships.

    For banking, many use to ask for AAB for grad jobs, they don't now, but it's kind of an. unwritten preference.

    I'd go in to uni and resit simultaneously; if you get 2:1 at the end, it's all good.
    This is what I'd do. You'll be learning an extension of your one of your A-level courses through the degree anyway, so you wouldn't really have to worry about 1/3 of the workload. The other two would simply require you to keep tabs on the material and revise a tad during exam period. Given first year can be quite forgiving you could manage it if you skipped a few nights out.
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    Personally, TAKE IT AND RUN.

    You can always resit your A-Levels if you want but with a degree, you can do a Sandwich course meaning work experience plus a degree. That trumps A levels any day...
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    I think were I in your position and I really thought I might want a career in law, then I would defer university for a year, and go back to school to retake all of my A'levels. Then absolutely blitz them, and hope that I could persuade law firms in the future that I made a very silly mistake (... but look, I showed what I could do when I got three A*s the following year).

    If I didn't want a career in law then I'd probably go to university and forget about the A'levels.

    But I find it difficult to think that anyone could retake A'levels and do a degree course at the same time, whilst performing to the best of their abilities in both.
    ohhh yeah i see what you mean now i was thinking of a possible deferal however i havent really sure how i would go about it and yeah i was predicted AAA so it was a real shock on results would firms look at my resits and some would automaically reject me due to those resits which has been said im still really unsure what to do really
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I'd agree with this - although I suspect they are already committed to the course and would need to see if the university/student finance would allow them to defer at no or little cost.
    i have looked into a defferal but im a few weeks into my course so not surw how i would go about it
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    (Original post by ETbuymilkandeggs)
    This is what I'd do. You'll be learning an extension of your one of your A-level courses through the degree anyway, so you wouldn't really have to worry about 1/3 of the workload. The other two would simply require you to keep tabs on the material and revise a tad during exam period. Given first year can be quite forgiving you could manage it if you skipped a few nights out.
    yeah i think that would be very possible espically in the first year
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    (Original post by liam189)
    i have looked into a defferal but im a few weeks into my course so not surw how i would go about it
    The quicker you speak to someone about it the better. Go to student servies and student finance at your university and see what they say. Also try and speak to someone in your faculty to see whether it is possible (they have probably had to deal with this type of situation before).

    It might not make sense if you are committed to the course, and will be liable for the year's fees. But it is worthwhile investigating this ASAP - the longer you leave it the less likely that it will be possible.
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    Personally, TAKE IT AND RUN.

    You can always resit your A-Levels if you want but with a degree, you can do a Sandwich course meaning work experience plus a degree. That trumps A levels any day...
    yeah i would be hopeing to get experience at the law clinic at my university
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    Are you aware of how hard it will be to get a training contract?
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    Since there were no extenuating circumstances, how did you balls up so badly?
 
 
 
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