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    You can evaluate some sources:

    by browsing, to evaluate whether they are sufficiently relevant to your research topic and sufficiently reputable for the level of research;

    by focusing on the most relevant items, evaluating how these support specific aspects of your line of reasoning;

    by comparing and contrasting different sources, checking for inconsistencies.

    How would you do this? Can anyone give any examples please?
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    (Original post by Theguynextdoor)
    You can evaluate some sources:

    by browsing, to evaluate whether they are sufficiently relevant to your research topic and sufficiently reputable for the level of research;

    by focusing on the most relevant items, evaluating how these support specific aspects of your line of reasoning;

    by comparing and contrasting different sources, checking for inconsistencies.

    How would you do this? Can anyone give any examples please?
    Which bit? Quite a lot of this is common sense and self explanatory. You wouldn't use the Daily Mail or Wikipedia as an academic source for example.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Which bit? Quite a lot of this is common sense and self explanatory. You wouldn't use the Daily Mail or Wikipedia as an academic source for example.
    Not more of using the sources from Wikipedia but evaluating the sources you have chosen from lets say "The Leviathan" or from a primary research - the way to evaluate why you chose the source to be critical.

    How it supports the line of reasoning
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    Whilst I was at uni in my final year, we had a lot of evaluation type assignments- and the one thing I referred to most frequently was something called the CASP tool- it's more aimed for qualitative sources of research/ evidence but can easily be adapted to quantitative evidence. It's basically a list of 9/10 questions with lots of different sub questions, which can be used to allow critical evaluation of a source/ piece of research used in assignments.
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    (Original post by Theguynextdoor)
    Not more of using the sources from Wikipedia but evaluating the sources you have chosen from lets say "The Leviathan" or from a primary research - the way to evaluate why you chose the source to be critical.

    How it supports the line of reasoning
    Is it an academically recognised source, who has written it, when, what sources have they used to back up their arguments and are they relevant and current, it's always a good idea to pick primary over secondary resources though if this is not possible trace your secondary source's sources back to their primary origins. Depending on your line of reasoning you can work out if the work you're citing supports it or not and to what extent and then what else you need to back up your arguments.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Is it an academically recognised source, who has written it, when, what sources have they used to back up their arguments and are they relevant and current, it's always a good idea to pick primary over secondary resources though if this is not possible trace your secondary source's sources back to their primary origins. Depending on your line of reasoning you can work out if the work you're citing supports it or not and to what extent and then what else you need to back up your arguments.

    Thank you, the only problem I have is the first line of what you've written. The way I would phrase it directly that "have they backed up their arguments with well sourced information and the relevancy of it" I feel like I would be a bit too direct with just saying it is credible due to the fact that it is relevant and current within the essays and feel like I would not be critical when doing that, when citing the sources and critically evaluating them. Can I just say it flat out as the way you have, or does it have to be indirect within the text?
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    (Original post by Theguynextdoor)
    Thank you, the only problem I have is the first line of what you've written. The way I would phrase it directly that "have they backed up their arguments with well sourced information and the relevancy of it" I feel like I would be a bit too direct with just saying it is credible due to the fact that it is relevant and current within the essays and feel like I would not be critical when doing that, when citing the sources and critically evaluating them. Can I just say it flat out as the way you have, or does it have to be indirect within the text?
    If you've been asked to evaluate i.e give your opinion yes you can give you opinion. Just make sure you come across as formal and professional and can explain your reasoning.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    If you've been asked to evaluate i.e give your opinion yes you can give you opinion. Just make sure you come across as formal and professional and can explain your reasoning.
    Okay, thank you; I just feel like I come off as really tacky, lol. When explaining or giving my reasoning as mostly everytime I write the marks are always based on "critical information and to be critical when writing" - which makes it difficult for me.
 
 
 
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