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What degrees need to be supported by a university name? Watch

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    (Original post by J-SP)
    For most legal jobs, your university name will mean sweet FA.
    For good jobs it will mean something. Not all of us want some 20k job living in our parents house till we're 30.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    You are not taking into consideration non law students nor the number of applications made in the first place. The disproportionate levels, especially in London is based on many other factors before university name.
    I agree that by factoring in non-law students it would very slightly more proportional. But what are these 'other factors'?. Btw I wish it was more proportional, but it would be false to deny that Oxbridge dominates the market.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Stop flirting. And avoiding the question.
    When you stop being a t**t, I'll have a reasonable conversation with you. But all the time you are trying to power play by trying to get one up on me, put me down or even worse try to sexualise me some how is beyond any level of normality, even for an online forum.

    If you think it's funny/entertaining, then you have got some form of personality disorder.
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    (Original post by PoliticsandP)
    I agree that by factoring in non-law students it would very slightly more proportional. But what are these 'other factors'?. Btw I wish it was more proportional, but it would be false to deny that Oxbridge dominates the market.
    So if I told you over 23% of applicants for the programmes I looked after would come from Oxbridge, would you understand part of the skew?
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    (Original post by SGHD26716)
    For medicine when you apply for F1 (first job after graduating) your medical school is hidden by law.
    Wow I never knew this!
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    When you stop being a t**t, I'll have a reasonable conversation with you. But all the time you are trying to power play by trying to get one up on me, put me down or even worse try to sexualise me some how is beyond any level of normality, even for an online forum.

    If you think it's funny/entertaining, then you have got some form of personality disorder.
    I have no need try to get you one up on you. I asked a legitimate question and you responded by calling me pathetic. I am not sure what type of professional response you want from that.

    There is a legitimate case to be made that people involved in HR aspects of law firms deal mostly with quantitative data. The people who make the final decision, take part in interviews etc, are looking for qualitative features such as academic interests, knowledge of the law, knowledge of substantive legal developments, and lastly the academic calibre of the applicant's university and course. Rather than directly say "you're only an HR consultant" I tried to make a joke out of it assuming you had good humour; for that, I was mistaken and apologise.
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    For example, Law is going to be competitive, and the university name is going to make a big impact for the application. What other degrees are like this? Does STEM not have to worry about this too much?
    I would have thought a lot depends on the employer and their sort of philosophy / code / vision. For example, as someone has mentioned for the Civil Service it shouldn't matter (although I've heard a disproportionately high number of Oxford & Cambridge graduates get onto the grad scheme; then again, maybe that's just because they're highly intelligent and it shows) and a lot of companies with an emphasis on diversity may not care so much about what university you studied at. Other companies may be more prestigious, have less emphasis on diversity, or for whatever reason prefer to employ people from traditionally prestigious universities.

    Also, there are some sectors where your university doesn't matter in theory, but in practice it opens doors. Journalism, TV and politics are three good examples. There are networks at certain universities (again, Oxford & Cambridge as an example) which enable you to get to know the right people to be able to get your foot in the door.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    I have no need try to get you one up on you. I asked a legitimate question and you responded by calling me pathetic. I am not sure what type of professional response you want from that.

    There is a legitimate case to be made that people involved in HR aspects of law firms deal mostly with quantitative data. The people who make the final decision, take part in interviews etc, are looking for qualitative features such as academic interests, knowledge of the law, knowledge of substantive legal developments, and lastly the academic calibre of the applicant's university and course. Rather than directly say "you're only an HR consultant" I tried to make a joke out of it assuming you had good humour; for that, I was mistaken and apologise.
    Don't play all innocent now and try and cover your backside now. There was clearly intent there to try and hit a nerve. It's unfortunately becoming too common from you and it's truly creepy. Even your subsequent posts/messages are full of condescending language and snide belittling.

    Considering I was the person who made the final decision, I think I know a bit more about how it works, and I can tell you it's not as simple as you describe.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Don't play all innocent now and try and cover your backside now. There was clearly intent there to try and hit a nerve. It's unfortunately becoming too common from you and it's truly creepy.

    Considering I was the person who made the final decision, I think I know a bit more about how it works, and I can tell you it's not as simple as you describe.
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    This is starting to tempt me towards law again, I see so many things that are exaggerated on this site which keeps putting me off certain degrees
    Degree subject does not equal a career in the same subject. Some STEM careers require academic knowledge, but vast majority of career opportunities out there won't require a specific degree subject.

    Unless you are completely focused and set on a career that requires a specific degree subject, go and do a degree that you want to study, not one that may/may not lead to a competitive career.
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    economics
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    I think courses at the Big 8 can be supported by the university name.

    The Big 8 are Cambridge, LSE, Manchester, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, Edinburgh and Kings College London.

    For some other unis, the university names actually hinder the student.

    E.g.
    Person A: "What did you study at Uni?"
    Person B: "I studied Maths"
    Person A: "Whereabouts?"
    Person B: "I studied at ..."
    Person A: "Oh, ok, is that in the UK?"

    Or

    Person A: "What did you study at Uni?"
    Person B: "I studied Modern Languages"
    Person A: "where?"
    Person B: "Cambridge."
    Person A: "Oh, ok."
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    I'd say it honestly depends on the subject and reputation of the department when discussing humanities. Say I wanted to apply for a PhD or MA in something to do with bilingualism overseas, I'd be better off studying linguistics at somewhere like Bangor rather than Manchester, although Manchester would likely be better if I wanted to study computational linguistics and work with AI, for example
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    Investment Banking.
    They don't even care what degree you do lmfao. It's all about what university you went to. Same goes for consulting
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    I think courses at the Big 8 can be supported by the university name.

    The Big 8 are Cambridge, LSE, Manchester, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, Edinburgh and Kings College London.

    For some other unis, the university names actually hinder the student.

    E.g.
    Person A: "What did you study at Uni?"
    Person B: "I studied Maths"
    Person A: "Whereabouts?"
    Person B: "I studied at ..."
    Person A: "Oh, ok, is that in the UK?"

    Or

    Person A: "What did you study at Uni?"
    Person B: "I studied Modern Languages"
    Person A: "where?"
    Person B: "Cambridge."
    Person A: "Oh, ok."
    Warwick? Durham? Bristol?
    There's far too many top universities in the UK to definitively name a top 8. But I do agree with your statement, especially for Oxbridge.
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    (Original post by Skyewoods)
    It's not the University that supports the degree, it's the university that supports the industry. Investment bankers want people from oxbridge. The degree they study doesn't matter as much as the university. For more competitive industries your university matters more than your degree
    Lol stop catfishing. Fairly sure I know the person in that pic.
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    (Original post by Pidge Gunderson)
    Warwick? Durham? Bristol?
    There's far too many top universities in the UK to definitively name a top 8. But I do agree with your statement, especially for Oxbridge.
    I recognise that but those universities, in my opinion, will be classed as the Little 8.

    Durham, Bristol, Warwick, St Andrews, Nottingham, York, Glasgow and Sheffield.

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    (Original post by shameful_burrito)
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    In STEM subjects normally relevant work is either in engineering (which has all the same trappings of any other competitive sector for the most desirable positions, but has the benefit fo there being many others besides and a lower number of incoming graduates) or realistically, research based. For the latter in academia, where you studied is a lot less important than who you studied under, and to a lesser extent what group(s) you were working in/with. In industry this is still relevant but more towards the research groups you were working in, and then to an extent where you got your degree (i.e. PhD, not undergrad) from.
 
 
 
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