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    Hey everyone,
    I’m currently in year 11 and I have decided I really want to do law at uni. I would LOVE to go to Oxford even though it’s really hard to get in. I’m at a private school. I just wanted to know if there is anything I can do over the next few years to help me.
    Xx
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    Study hard and get the best exam results you possible can.
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    (Original post by Ebxox)
    I’m currently in year 11 and I have decided I really want to do law at uni. I would LOVE to go to Oxford even though it’s really hard to get in. I’m at a private school. I just wanted to know if there is anything I can do over the next few years to help me.
    Stretch yourself, and really understand the material of whatever you learn (there are no set subject requirements). Oxford will only care about ECs that show passion for law (aka jurisprudence). You could also look at some LNAT papers - you need to do well on that.
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    Get lots of work experience, especially at law firms and I'd definitely go on websites like Sutton Trust and apply for summer schools. The Citizenship Foundation does mock trials which are good to get involved in, and make sure you visit your local Crown Court so you have lots to write on your personal statement. Many places in London do law lectures so I'd go look for some online. I'm personally not applying to Oxford but these are some general things you should have a think about outside of exams.
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    (Original post by crypaint)
    Get lots of work experience, especially at law firms and I'd definitely go on websites like Sutton Trust and apply for summer schools. The Citizenship Foundation does mock trials which are good to get involved in, and make sure you visit your local Crown Court so you have lots to write on your personal statement. Many places in London do law lectures so I'd go look for some online. I'm personally not applying to Oxford but these are some general things you should have a think about outside of exams.
    That could do that. Or they could do something useful like focus on their academics.

    How many law students do you think haven't visited the Crown Court? It proves absolutely nothing, other than you were free one Tuesday.
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    its not necessary to get work experience but it wont harm you if you do
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    Don’t do law at a level if you plan to do it at uni. I take law as an a level right now but want to go into criminology so it compliments it nicely. However, a few of the people in my class want to take law for uni and both our law teachers have said that a law a level is sometimes looked down upon if applying to do it as a degree as the lecturers believes it hinders the ability to take in what you learn at degree level (we haven’t done much so far but I’ve gathered that a level law is basically useful knowledge and that’s about it). It is very interesting though but if you plan on doing it just make sure you check what Oxford thinks about it. Also, try and get ANY kind of work experience in a solicitors/lawyers office or a court. Even being an assistant or intern would look good
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    Being an assistant or intern or anything else in a solicitor's office will be of no benefit at all in an Oxford law application. It's also likely to be very boring.

    Work very hard in all your subjects, and read anything to do with law that you find interesting. That's about it really.
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    Jhg
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    That could do that. Or they could do something useful like focus on their academics.

    How many law students do you think haven't visited the Crown Court? It proves absolutely nothing, other than you were free one Tuesday.
    Yeah but academics are a given?
    For me, work experience was encouraged at school and there is literally no harm in doing it. It shows your're dedicated and passionate in your subject, and gives you something to write about in a personal statement. Even if it is just going to the Crown Court, it's a start.
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    (Original post by crypaint)
    Yeah but academics are a given?
    For me, work experience was encouraged at school and there is literally no harm in doing it. It shows your're dedicated and passionate in your subject, and gives you something to write about in a personal statement. Even if it is just going to the Crown Court, it's a start.
    Ordering food at a restaurant is a given too. Doesn't mean you should order a new Lexus to spice things up.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Ordering food at a restaurant is a given too. Doesn't mean you should order a new Lexus to spice things up.
    I just gave my own advice, the person who made the thread can take it or leave it
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    Everybody being considered will have the necessary grades.

    What will set you apart is your passion for the subject and for a career in the profession. This can be evidenced through the experiences you gain (off your own back).

    Things you can do (non-exhaustive):

    Marshalling (shadowing a judge), mini-pupillages (work experience at a barristers Chambers), work experience at a law firm, member of a college law society or debating club. Even just attending crown court (in a spectating capacity, preferably).

    I studied law at uni, a Masters in law and the Bar Professional Training Course.

    Edit:

    Also, be a normal human. Have hobbies, play an instrument etc. This applies for anyone applying to anything. Stand out!
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    (Original post by crypaint)
    I just gave my own advice, the person who made the thread can take it or leave it
    You gave rather unhelpful advice, though. And then you tried to present premises to support it.

    Ultimately, sourcing ECs is a distraction from the activities which should be your priorities. While you are frantically trying to secure marashalling opportunities at a very busy time of your life, and getting quite anxious about it, you are not doing academic extracurricular activities or writing your PS. Also you fall in the temptation of writing about the marshalling/law firm experiences extensively because you have invested so much time and effort in completing them. They literally can do harm, and they add very little to your application.


    (Original post by GaiusBalthar)
    Things you can do (non-exhaustive):

    Marshalling (shadowing a judge), mini-pupillages (work experience at a barristers Chambers), work experience at a law firm, member of a college law society or debating club. Even just attending crown court (in a spectating capacity, preferably).
    You have spent too much time in your law textbooks.
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    Start revising for your A-levels now, I'm not even joking.
    Hire a tutor if you can!
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    You gave rather unhelpful advice, though. And then you tried to present premises to support it.

    Ultimately, sourcing ECs is a distraction from the activities which should be your priorities. While you are frantically trying to secure marashalling opportunities at a very busy time of your life, and getting quite anxious about it, you are not doing academic extracurricular activities or writing your PS. Also you fall in the temptation of writing about the marshalling/law firm experiences extensively because you have invested so much time and effort in completing them. They literally can do harm, and they add very little to your application.




    You have spent too much time in your law textbooks.
    I don't really understand what you mean?

    I did spend time in text books, I also did the activities I suggested and secured scholarships at LLB, LLM and BPTC level. I speak from an informed and knowledgable position on this matter.

    To suggest that showing passion (through gaining experience) in the area you wish to study adds little value is clearly wrong.

    You have presumed that this will be a distraction, that the individual will be anxious and that they will be frantic. They are posting on a website two years before uni starts. They seem quite able to forward think and plan their time. This individual has time as an ally and If they intend to apply to Oxford then they will need an awful lot more than grades.

    Your experiences should never be listed, but should inform your reasoning and explanation of why you want to study what you are applying for.

    I think you should be a little more considerate when providing people with 'advice', just incase someone mistakenly follows it.
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    (Original post by Ebxox)
    Hey everyone,
    I’m currently in year 11 and I have decided I really want to do law at uni. I would LOVE to go to Oxford even though it’s really hard to get in. I’m at a private school. I just wanted to know if there is anything I can do over the next few years to help me.
    Xx
    I would also suggest attending an open day ASAP. This will allow you to ask questions about what they expect from candidates (and plan accordingly). It will also allow you to explain 'Why Oxford?' On your application.
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    (Original post by GaiusBalthar)
    I don't really understand what you mean?

    I did spend time in text books, I also did the activities I suggested and secured scholarships at LLB, LLM and BPTC level. I speak from an informed and knowledgable position on this matter.

    To suggest that showing passion (through gaining experience) in the area you wish to study adds little value is clearly wrong.

    You have presumed that this will be a distraction, that the individual will be anxious and that they will be frantic. They are posting on a website two years before uni starts. They seem quite able to forward think and plan their time. This individual has time as an ally and If they intend to apply to Oxford then they will need an awful lot more than grades.

    Your experiences should never be listed, but should inform your reasoning and explanation of why you want to study what you are applying for.

    I think you should be a little more considerate when providing people with 'advice', just incase someone mistakenly follows it.
    I was making fun of your overly formal use of "non-exhaustive". See how it was bolded.

    It is not gaining experience in the area you are going to study, though. That is, unless OP is applying to study the BPTC straight from A-Level. I was under the impression he/she was applying to study academic law, for which marshalling/law firm experience will not confirm your suitability. The main reason for this is because you take these experiences on as a pre-applicant to an undergraduate law course and have no means to understand the substantive content of the law you are exposed on those work experiences.

    You don't need legal work experience to study for an LLM either, nor a scholarship. Trust me, I should know.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    I was making fun of your overly formal use of "non-exhaustive". See how it was bolded.

    It is not gaining experience in the area you are going to study, though. That is, unless OP is applying to study the BPTC straight from A-Level. I was under the impression he/she was applying to study academic law, for which marshalling/law firm experience will not confirm your suitability. The main reason for this is because you take these experiences on as a pre-applicant to an undergraduate law course and have no means to understand the substantive content of the law you are exposed on those work experiences.

    You don't need legal work experience to study for an LLM either, nor a scholarship. Trust me, I should know.
    You really do chat a load of rubbish!

    Your pre-applicant lack of understanding nonsense is, frankly, nonsense. Many people without law degrees or any legal education undertake legal work experience to secure training contracts and pupillage. These would be those who intend to study the GDL and then the LPC or BPTC. They can and do secure a TC or pupillage before ever having picked up a law book.

    Furthermore, the English and Welsh legal system (as well as many other common law systems) relies heavily on case law to paint the legal landscape, it is obvious to me that even an academic can draw value from marshalling and the other experiences I mentioned.

    You seem to really enjoy picking those cherries. Legal work experience will strengthen undergraduate applications if used to demonstrate passion for the subject and a reason for wanting to be X professional. It is not difficult to get on an LLM programme, unless you're applying for a very good university. But then it tends to be your grades that are important. Inns of Court Scholarships will not be secured if you don't have legal work experience. Pupillage and training contracts can be applied for at the end of second year, work experience amongst other things will be essential at this point.

    The personal statement is not an affidavit. Experience gained can be stretched to strengthen the personal statement, even if the applicant wants to be a lifelong academic, which I'm sure is the desire of the majority of 18 year old law students.

    (If I were you, I'd stick to academic law :P)

    Btw, I'm going to drop you the details of the medical student thread so you can all tell them how they don't need to gain experience in a caring environment to strengthen their applications. And when someone challenges you, you can tell them they don't want to be carers, so why bother

    To be clear to the original poster, ignore any 'advice' which suggests that you shouldn't gain valuable experiences in order to strengthen your application to study Law. I was involved in student recruitment for a number of years and I can tell you that it can give you an edge, especially when applying to highly competitive universities.
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    (Original post by GaiusBalthar)
    You really do chat a load of rubbish!

    Your pre-applicant lack of understanding nonsense is, frankly, nonsense. Many people without law degrees or any legal education undertake legal work experience to secure training contracts and pupillage. These would be those who intend to study the GDL and then the LPC or BPTC. They can and do secure a TC or pupillage before ever having picked up a law book.

    Furthermore, the English and Welsh legal system (as well as many other common law systems) relies heavily on case law to paint the legal landscape, it is obvious to me that even an academic can draw value from marshalling and the other experiences I mentioned.

    You seem to really enjoy picking those cherries. Legal work experience will strengthen undergraduate applications if used to demonstrate passion for the subject and a reason for wanting to be X professional. It is not difficult to get on an LLM programme, unless you're applying for a very good university. But then it tends to be your grades that are important. Inns of Court Scholarships will not be secured if you don't have legal work experience. Pupillage and training contracts can be applied for at the end of second year, work experience amongst other things will be essential at this point.

    The personal statement is not an affidavit. Experience gained can be stretched to strengthen the personal statement, even if the applicant wants to be a lifelong academic, which I'm sure is the desire of the majority of 18 year old law students.

    (If I were you, I'd stick to academic law :P)

    Btw, I'm going to drop you the details of the medical student thread so you can all tell them how they don't need to gain experience in a caring environment to strengthen their applications. And when someone challenges you, you can tell them they don't want to be carers, so why bother

    To be clear to the original poster, ignore any 'advice' which suggests that you shouldn't gain valuable experiences in order to strengthen your application to study Law. I was involved in student recruitment for a number of years and I can tell you that it can give you an edge, especially when applying to highly competitive universities.
    You seem to be confused here. We are talking not about what aids TC/VS and pupillage applications, as you seem to think, but what is needed for a law degree application. What prospective GDLs do prior to commencing the course, to make themselves more legally employable, is irrelevant. What students want to do in second year is likewise irrelevant. The idea that a professor who specialises in the tort of privacy, and spends his time quoting Aristotle and Mill, is going to be impressed that you want to be a solicitor because you've spent a week at a law firm messing around on Facebook ... well, it is unlikely. He is going to think you are simply naive. Focus on Aristotle and Mill in your PS, not what you want to be doing in 4 years' time.

    Medicine is a practical degree which involves med students taking part in practical exercises. It is common sensical that such a degree should require practical experience. Law, however, is purely academic. I also find it curious that you think people who have gone from LLB, LLM to PhD could gain more expertise of their research area if they performed tasks that 16-year-old students regularly undertake.

    You don't need experience to get on a BPTC either. There are a few porky pies in your posts too: you said you've worked for NHS (that's not recruiting law students at the top unis) and that you have an MSc healthcare (that's not an LLM). You also are a mature student whose undergrad was a long time. Plus you got into law school with terrible A-Levels, so you likely don't have experience applying to the top unis either or if you do it was a long time ago. I don't say this to be rude, but it is something OP should have in mind.
 
 
 
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