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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    You seem to be confused here. We are talking not about what aids TC/VS and pupillage applications, as you seem to think, but what is needed for a law degree application. What prospective GDLs do prior to commencing the course, to make themselves more legally employable, is irrelevant. What students want to do in second year is likewise irrelevant. The idea that a professor who specialises in the tort of privacy, and spends his time quoting Aristotle and Mill, is going to be impressed that you want to be a solicitor because you've spent a week at a law firm messing around on Facebook ... well, it is unlikely. He is going to think you are simply naive. Focus on Aristotle and Mill in your PS, not what you want to be doing in 4 years' time.

    Medicine is a practical degree which involves med students taking part in practical exercises. It is common sensical that such a degree should require practical experience. Law, however, is purely academic. I also find it curious that you think people who have gone from LLB, LLM to PhD could gain more expertise of their research area if they performed tasks that 16-year-old students regularly undertake.

    You don't need experience to get on a BPTC either. There are a few porky pies in your posts too: you said you've worked for NHS (that's not recruiting law students at the top unis) and that you have an MSc healthcare (that's not an LLM). You also are a mature student whose undergrad was a long time. Plus you got into law school with terrible A-Levels, so you likely don't have experience applying to the top unis either or if you do it was a long time ago. I don't say this to be rude, but it is something OP should have in mind.
    No confusion, merely addressing some of the rather drifty comments you have made. I have had to go off topic to reign back your presumptions.

    For example, I could ask you to highlight where I mentioned LLM or PHD students going on a weeks work experience to a law firm? I didn't. It's something you have made up, like many things in your responses. You seem to have quite the habit of presumption and misquoting.

    What I did say is even an academic can gain a benefit from previously mentioned experiences. This was in response to your disingenuous point of a student only applying to law to study academic law. It is clear that most students applying to law have a grandiose idea of what they want to do (and it isn't academic law). It is clear my point was that a 16 year old wishing to study (academic) law can also benefit from the experiences mentioned.

    Can you also please show me the quote where I said that you needed work experience to get on a BPTC course? I didn't. You made that up too. What I did say is that you need work experience to successful secure an Inns of Court Scholarship. Once again, your habit of lying shines through.

    Do not focus on Aristotle and Mill in your personal statement! That is exactly what puts people off when reading your application. It is perfectly acceptable if you want to be a solicitor or a barrister to say as much in your PS, and to back that up with an experience you've had is fanatastic (as long as it's not over egged). It is also perfectly acceptable to draw on those experiences to demonstrate why you want to study law, without having to specify a career path.

    I don't have the same time or inclination as you, to look at any of your (historic) posts. It's a little insecure to be honest. Your attempt to cast dispersions is not a good trait, it comes from a position of insecurity and weakness.

    In terms of porky pies, I stated I previously worked in student recruitment, not presently (another misread/presumption/lie on your part). That means that I can currently work in a different job, like the NHS, for example. Just so you know, adults can have a list of jobs that they've done, over time, moving from one to the next . On your point of an LLM, I studied my LLB, then LLM, then BPTC. After spending some time in law, I studied my MSc with an intention to possibly studying postgraduate medicine after gaining experience in the NHS. Other than that information (to counter your points) I really don't have any need to divulge personal information to you on a thread.

    A ward of caution, you should try to not make wild presumptions and cast dispersions on people because you have difficulty in reading and digesting what people are saying to you. You also shouldn't give poor advice to people looking to start their careers. I don't know if this is something which you regularly do, but it might be wiser to think before you type. If you have problems making coherent arguments then mooting (I did on my LLM) and debating might assist you in that respect. I think I might have just suggested legal experiences to an LLM student, oh the sacrilege...

    On a serious note, if you have any personal questions (such as universities) then inbox me as I won't reply on a thread .
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    (Original post by GaiusBalthar)
    No confusion, merely addressing some of the rather drifty comments you have made. I have had to go off topic to reign back your presumptions.

    For example, I could ask you to highlight where I mentioned LLM or PHD students going on a weeks work experience to a law firm? I didn't. It's something you have made up, like many things in your responses. You seem to have quite the habit of presumption and misquoting.

    What I did say is even an academic can gain a benefit from previously mentioned experiences. This was in response to your disingenuous point of a student only applying to law to study academic law. It is clear that most students applying to law have a grandiose idea of what they want to do (and it isn't academic law). It is clear my point was that a 16 year old wishing to study (academic) law can also benefit from the experiences mentioned.

    Can you also please show me the quote where I said that you needed work experience to get on a BPTC course? I didn't. You made that up too. What I did say is that you need work experience to successful secure an Inns of Court Scholarship. Once again, your habit of lying shines through.

    Do not focus on Aristotle and Mill in your personal statement! That is exactly what puts people off when reading your application. It is perfectly acceptable if you want to be a solicitor or a barrister to say as much in your PS, and to back that up with an experience you've had is fanatastic (as long as it's not over egged). It is also perfectly acceptable to draw on those experiences to demonstrate why you want to study law, without having to specify a career path.

    I don't have the same time or inclination as you, to look at any of your (historic) posts. It's a little insecure to be honest. Your attempt to cast dispersions is not a good trait, it comes from a position of insecurity and weakness.

    In terms of porky pies, I stated I previously worked in student recruitment, not presently (another misread/presumption/lie on your part). That means that I can currently work in a different job, like the NHS, for example. Just so you know, adults can have a list of jobs that they've done, over time, moving from one to the next . On your point of an LLM, I studied my LLB, then LLM, then BPTC. After spending some time in law, I studied my MSc with an intention to possibly studying postgraduate medicine after gaining experience in the NHS. Other than that information (to counter your points) I really don't have any need to divulge personal information to you on a thread.

    A ward of caution, you should try to not make wild presumptions and cast dispersions on people because you have difficulty in reading and digesting what people are saying to you. You also shouldn't give poor advice to people looking to start their careers. I don't know if this is something which you regularly do, but it might be wiser to think before you type. If you have problems making coherent arguments then mooting (I did on my LLM) and debating might assist you in that respect. I think I might have just suggested legal experiences to an LLM student, oh the sacrilege...

    On a serious note, if you have any personal questions (such as universities) then inbox me as I won't reply on a thread .
    If OP is looking to get onto an LLB at the place you did it, which accepted mediocre A-Levels, then I would tell them to accept your learned advice.

    Good luck with the medical course, though. I am sure that's less competitive than the criminal bar.

    For OP,
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...ctivities.html
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    If OP is looking to get onto an LLB at the place you did it, which accepted mediocre A-Levels, then I would tell them to accept your learned advice.

    Good luck with the medical course, though. I am sure that's less competitive than the criminal bar.

    For OP,
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...ctivities.html
    A case of sour grapes is always transparent and hilarious.

    I'm sure OP will follow your exceptional advice of not doing anything to demonstrate their passion for the subject they wish to study. Who wouldn't follow good quality advice like that .
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    (Original post by GaiusBalthar)
    A case of sour grapes is always transparent and hilarious.

    I'm sure OP will follow your exceptional advice of not doing anything to demonstrate their passion for the subject they wish to study. Who wouldn't follow good quality advice like that .
    As I said, it's nothing personal. You just have to acknowledge the limitations of your expertise.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    As I said, it's nothing personal. You just have to acknowledge the limitations of your expertise.
    Well thank goodness you've come to your senses and made that acknowledgement.
 
 
 
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