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    Hi! I'm taking my GCSEs in May 2018, and I'm hoping to start revision now so I can stay on top of all my coursework. I need some advice though, I'm struggling to revise for English. I have to study these things because I know they will be in the papers: 15 power and conflict poems, Macbeth, An inspector calls, and Jekyll and Hyde. I'm not sure how I'm meant to revise these apart from making annotations, but they don't seem to be helping me remember any quotes or key parts of the texts. Does anyone have any tips on what I should do/ what revision methods worked well for you in your exams? Thanks
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    Hello there!

    I did an Inspector Calls and Macbeth as part of my WJEC GCSE exam a couple of years ago.
    For an inspector calls, I found that making a spider diagram of main themes and quotes quite helpful and organised my revision which made it easier to memorise. I also acted out some scenes with my friends which helped us understand the text a bit better, while saying the words aloud enabled us to ingrain the quotes into our brains.
    For Macbeth, I did something similar, but instead of themes, I organised my quotes based on important scenes throughout the book, like the witches' prophecy, Lady Macbeth persuading Macbeth to kill Duncan, the murders, the descent into insanity, and finally the defeat. All the while, I thought of around three reasons why I chose a particular quote to memorise, linking it in with other themes or explanations.

    I was lucky enough to escape learning the 15 pieces of prose, but if I were in your position, I'd probably make sticky notes of key quotes and points from each poem and place them in random parts of the house, saying them out loud while I pass by each one. I know it sounds stupid but it genuinely helps.

    Good luck for your exams!
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    Thank you so much for your help! The spider diagram sounds like a really good idea, I'll definitley try doing that
    (Original post by Sophia_WCH14)
    Hello there!

    I did an Inspector Calls and Macbeth as part of my WJEC GCSE exam a couple of years ago.
    For an inspector calls, I found that making a spider diagram of main themes and quotes quite helpful and organised my revision which made it easier to memorise. I also acted out some scenes with my friends which helped us understand the text a bit better, while saying the words aloud enabled us to ingrain the quotes into our brains.
    For Macbeth, I did something similar, but instead of themes, I organised my quotes based on important scenes throughout the book, like the witches' prophecy, Lady Macbeth persuading Macbeth to kill Duncan, the murders, the descent into insanity, and finally the defeat. All the while, I thought of around three reasons why I chose a particular quote to memorise, linking it in with other themes or explanations.

    I was lucky enough to escape learning the 15 pieces of prose, but if I were in your position, I'd probably make sticky notes of key quotes and points from each poem and place them in random parts of the house, saying them out loud while I pass by each one. I know it sounds stupid but it genuinely helps.

    Good luck for your exams!
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    hi, M BRUFF he is my lifesaver and i left with A* in lang and A in lit and its all down to him!

    but for poems i found mind maps super useful, books was loads of annotating and making notes i guess on the stuff you will be assessed on such as character, themes etc.

    lang you cant really revise for its just practice

    but i did aqa, relationships poem and mice and an inspector calls
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    Hi, I do Macbeth, A Christmas Carol, An Inspector Calls and the Power & Conflict anthology.

    For the poems I'd recommend Mr Bruff, and make spider diagrams - branching off with structure, language, form, context and themes. Learn to spot the similarities and differences between poems.

    For the books I write down key quotes and analyse them in lots of depth, linking it into themes and the wider play. Learn key extracts and how to write about them, learn the key themes and how they're presented, learn the importance of each character.

    By the way, last year I was failing English and now I'm a grade 7/8
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    I did Power and Conflict, Romeo and Juliet, Christmas Carol and Blood Brothers. For the novels go through them and write down every quotation you think is useful, because all you need are quotations and a general gist of the story so you can give background info in the exam. For poetry, some poems overlap in themes: the exam questions will only require you to compare the given poem to one of a similar theme. So I'd say pick 5-6 poems that together cover all the main themes (with at least 2 poems that can be used for each theme as one of them may turn up in the exam). Revise these poems in lots of detail. Then just do light revision for the other poems so you can reference them to show your knowledge, or in case a theme comes up where your main poems are difficult to use for it. Still, make an attempt to use one of the poems you revised in detail even if the theme links aren't strong so that you show the examiner you're capable of good interpretation and analysis.
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