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    I've been having anxiety issues ever since I can remember, but I remember learning that it could be anxiety as a mental illness around the age of 12 as that was when I was beginning to get panic attacks so I looked into it a bit more. I'm 17 now, and I'm in year 13 so I'm doing a lot for university applications and such, but recently I've got to a point where I'm so sick of feeling anxious constantly. I'm not sure if anyone else got to a point like me in a similar situation. I want to get help and go to my GP but I wanted to know what would happen if I do? Has anyone gone through to a GP for anxiety and could tell me what happened to them? Thanks. x
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    you should visit a psychologist because it is a mental state of mind and doctors are working for your physical health whereas the psychologist/school counsellers with your emotional. tell me how it went.
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    Heya - I'm on a gap year at the moment. I think I've had episodes of depression/anxiety for the past few years but the last few months have been intense what with friends going to uni etc. I'm also going through the admissions process as well (complicated). About a month ago I went to the gp and they noticed scars on my arms from scratching and gave me a leaflet for anxiety and depression. I phoned up the number and now I'm starting on the phone CBT. After the sessions it feels like a huge wave of relief; rather than feeling sad and stressed I felt sad yet hopeful. It was cathartic and they gave me a link to a good app (free) called Calm Harm to help aid with self harm. I would recommend going to your GP because it could really help. They didn't dish out any meds or anything which I was really happy about. I'm still anxious and have moments of panic and fear of abandonment but I have hope now. If you want to chat more then I can PM you - good luck with everything x
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    I've been to my GP many times for my MH problems including anxiety disorders. What usually happens at the first appt is, they will ask you about what your concerns are and how long you've been anxious for and how it impacts you day to day and the GP may offer you medication to try and will probably also make a referal to either a CPN (mental health nurse), psychologist, psychiatrist or self help groups. Waiting lists for all of these are very long. I was put under as urgent and still waited 2 months which was deemed as quick in my area.

    If you chose to take meds, your GP will probably want to see you every week or 2 to check on how you are dealing with them for the first 2 or 3 months. If you get referred to therapy, it would probably be CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) you would get which is the bog standard therapy for anxiety problems. In the mean time, there are a lot of self help books and resources online that you could check out as well as dedicated anxiety forums online that you could visit to talk to others in the same boat as you.

    Its hard going to the doctor for MH problems but you are doing the right thing
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    I'm in year 13 and I've suffered with depression since the start of last year; I was forced to tell my college since they picked up on my attendance (it dropped to 64% last year, it's at 54% so far this year). I have a friend with anxiety, and the process is very similar.

    I would always recommend seeing a GP. Just tell them that you are having panic attacks, feeling anxious constantly, they'll probably ask you a few more questions and then tell you the best direction to head in. A GP will usually refer you to a therapist or counselor of some sorts for anxiety or depression - they're very reluctant to prescribe meds to under 18s. Depending on where you are, the waiting times between sessions can be pretty bad (mine is about 6 weeks) but it's worth getting that kind of support. I'm still struggling, admittedly, but I feel a lot more relieved. There was a lot of stuff I was bottling up and being able to talk to someone confidentially and without judgement is really, really amazing.

    I mentioned my college getting involved before because I'm wondering if you're college is aware of the situation and the stress you're going through? There isn't a lot they can do but if you have a personal tutor or something similar, it's definitely worth talking to them about it (as long as you have a decent PT, or a decent subject teacher). Although I was kinda forced to, my PT was really understanding and I wish I'd gone to her sooner. Having a point of support at college is a good idea, especially if your uni applications are making you anxious, as they can offer you at least someone to talk to (teachers are meant to keep info confidential unless they think that you are in serious danger of harming either yourself or someone else) and can recommend places to seek help other than a GP.

    Anyway, hope this helps!
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    (Original post by gabrielam)
    you should visit a psychologist because it is a mental state of mind and doctors are working for your physical health whereas the psychologist/school counsellers with your emotional. tell me how it went.
    GPs see people with concerns about their mental health every day. They are not just for physical illnesses. Also, a psychologist is not an MD and cannot prescribe medication.


    (Original post by amberxc)
    I've been having anxiety issues ever since I can remember, but I remember learning that it could be anxiety as a mental illness around the age of 12 as that was when I was beginning to get panic attacks so I looked into it a bit more. I'm 17 now, and I'm in year 13 so I'm doing a lot for university applications and such, but recently I've got to a point where I'm so sick of feeling anxious constantly. I'm not sure if anyone else got to a point like me in a similar situation. I want to get help and go to my GP but I wanted to know what would happen if I do? Has anyone gone through to a GP for anxiety and could tell me what happened to them? Thanks. x

    I have moved your thread to Mental Health so hopefully you can get some more helpful advice there.
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    (Original post by gabrielam)
    you should visit a psychologist because it is a mental state of mind and doctors are working for your physical health whereas the psychologist/school counsellers with your emotional. tell me how it went.
    Most people are seen in primary care in the UK when they're an adult or approaching the age of 18 - there isn't enough money in the MH service for everyone to see a psychiatrist/psychologist/therapist/CPN/etc. consistently on the NHS. Also, as Sabertooth said only medical doctors can prescribe medication - this includes GPs and psychiatrists. Clinical psycholosists don't have a medical degree, they have a doctorate in clinical psychology instead.

    amberxc: It can seem scary to see your GP about MH related concerns, but it is also hugely beneficial if they're willing to work with you. For your first appointment depending on a variety of factors they may give you a diagnosis and discuss a treatment plan or may refer you to secondary services if they feel this is needed (either for assessment or treatment).

    I would suggest you write everything down that you want to discuss with your GP and that way you can hand it to them if you cannot cope with reading it out loud or just use it as a reminder to jog your memory. A double appointment may also be very useful because it may take a long time for you to explain everything as this is such a long-standing issue, as well as taking someone with you for support.

    I've always found my GPs to be pretty supportive regarding my mental health (both at home and at university), and I've recently been referred back to secondary services due to a deterioration in my mental health recently.
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    To solve this problem first you have to visit the psychologist because my friend suffered from the same disorder and after consultation with her doctor now he's absolutely alright.
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    (Original post by Xxxibgdrgn12)
    hi,
    i would say im in a similar situation. since the start of this academic year, i've been on edge and i've had around 4 breakdowns (and i think its caused by stress over ucas).

    our school has councillors, so im booking appointments with them, i heard its quite difficult to get an appointment through the gp these days? does your school/college have any of these facilities? because no one in my school was aware of these councillors until this year when they made and assembly on it?
    no - my school doesn't offer that, I go to a sixth form so I'm connected to a high school and the high school offers it for the kids there but nothing for year 12 and 13
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Heya - I'm on a gap year at the moment. I think I've had episodes of depression/anxiety for the past few years but the last few months have been intense what with friends going to uni etc. I'm also going through the admissions process as well (complicated). About a month ago I went to the gp and they noticed scars on my arms from scratching and gave me a leaflet for anxiety and depression. I phoned up the number and now I'm starting on the phone CBT. After the sessions it feels like a huge wave of relief; rather than feeling sad and stressed I felt sad yet hopeful. It was cathartic and they gave me a link to a good app (free) called Calm Harm to help aid with self harm. I would recommend going to your GP because it could really help. They didn't dish out any meds or anything which I was really happy about. I'm still anxious and have moments of panic and fear of abandonment but I have hope now. If you want to chat more then I can PM you - good luck with everything x
    thank you so much, this really is helpful - I'm glad you're doing better than you was, good luck too! x
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    (Original post by Rum Ham)
    I've been to my GP many times for my MH problems including anxiety disorders. What usually happens at the first appt is, they will ask you about what your concerns are and how long you've been anxious for and how it impacts you day to day and the GP may offer you medication to try and will probably also make a referal to either a CPN (mental health nurse), psychologist, psychiatrist or self help groups. Waiting lists for all of these are very long. I was put under as urgent and still waited 2 months which was deemed as quick in my area.

    If you chose to take meds, your GP will probably want to see you every week or 2 to check on how you are dealing with them for the first 2 or 3 months. If you get referred to therapy, it would probably be CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) you would get which is the bog standard therapy for anxiety problems. In the mean time, there are a lot of self help books and resources online that you could check out as well as dedicated anxiety forums online that you could visit to talk to others in the same boat as you.

    Its hard going to the doctor for MH problems but you are doing the right thing
    thank you for this, it's really helpful for me x best of luck to you!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm in year 13 and I've suffered with depression since the start of last year; I was forced to tell my college since they picked up on my attendance (it dropped to 64% last year, it's at 54% so far this year). I have a friend with anxiety, and the process is very similar.

    I would always recommend seeing a GP. Just tell them that you are having panic attacks, feeling anxious constantly, they'll probably ask you a few more questions and then tell you the best direction to head in. A GP will usually refer you to a therapist or counselor of some sorts for anxiety or depression - they're very reluctant to prescribe meds to under 18s. Depending on where you are, the waiting times between sessions can be pretty bad (mine is about 6 weeks) but it's worth getting that kind of support. I'm still struggling, admittedly, but I feel a lot more relieved. There was a lot of stuff I was bottling up and being able to talk to someone confidentially and without judgement is really, really amazing.

    I mentioned my college getting involved before because I'm wondering if you're college is aware of the situation and the stress you're going through? There isn't a lot they can do but if you have a personal tutor or something similar, it's definitely worth talking to them about it (as long as you have a decent PT, or a decent subject teacher). Although I was kinda forced to, my PT was really understanding and I wish I'd gone to her sooner. Having a point of support at college is a good idea, especially if your uni applications are making you anxious, as they can offer you at least someone to talk to (teachers are meant to keep info confidential unless they think that you are in serious danger of harming either yourself or someone else) and can recommend places to seek help other than a GP.

    Anyway, hope this helps!
    thank you for this, the explanation of the process is really helpful! To answer you, my college doesn't know about this as I'm so quiet they tend to let me do my own thing workwise so they don't really notice if I seem down or edgy (eg, my photography teacher I've had for two yers doesn't even know my name lol). Best of luck to you! x
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    (Original post by smartdrugsrx)
    To solve this problem first you have to visit the psychologist because my friend suffered from the same disorder and after consultation with her doctor now he's absolutely alright.
    thank you for the reply, i'm glad he'd doing well! I'm definitely going to look into seeing a GP, thank you x
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    (Original post by Pathway)
    Most people are seen in primary care in the UK when they're an adult or approaching the age of 18 - there isn't enough money in the MH service for everyone to see a psychiatrist/psychologist/therapist/CPN/etc. consistently on the NHS. Also, as Sabertooth said only medical doctors can prescribe medication - this includes GPs and psychiatrists. Clinical psycholosists don't have a medical degree, they have a doctorate in clinical psychology instead.

    amberxc: It can seem scary to see your GP about MH related concerns, but it is also hugely beneficial if they're willing to work with you. For your first appointment depending on a variety of factors they may give you a diagnosis and discuss a treatment plan or may refer you to secondary services if they feel this is needed (either for assessment or treatment).

    I would suggest you write everything down that you want to discuss with your GP and that way you can hand it to them if you cannot cope with reading it out loud or just use it as a reminder to jog your memory. A double appointment may also be very useful because it may take a long time for you to explain everything as this is such a long-standing issue, as well as taking someone with you for support.

    I've always found my GPs to be pretty supportive regarding my mental health (both at home and at university), and I've recently been referred back to secondary services due to a deterioration in my mental health recently.
    this is really helpful, thank you for the reply x i'm sorry about the deterioration in your mental health, best of luck to you! x
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    GPs see people with concerns about their mental health every day. They are not just for physical illnesses. Also, a psychologist is not an MD and cannot prescribe medication.





    I have moved your thread to Mental Health so hopefully you can get some more helpful advice there.
    thank you!
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    (Original post by amberxc)
    I've been having anxiety issues ever since I can remember, but I remember learning that it could be anxiety as a mental illness around the age of 12 as that was when I was beginning to get panic attacks so I looked into it a bit more. I'm 17 now, and I'm in year 13 so I'm doing a lot for university applications and such, but recently I've got to a point where I'm so sick of feeling anxious constantly. I'm not sure if anyone else got to a point like me in a similar situation. I want to get help and go to my GP but I wanted to know what would happen if I do? Has anyone gone through to a GP for anxiety and could tell me what happened to them? Thanks. x
    I had a panic attack and it was completely ignored. I was diagnosed with schizophrenia about a year later and have had no further panic attacks. my mom also suffers from them. In all likelihood, unless your voice is shaking with panic they wont send you to a psych hospital.

    Theyll probably prescribe benzos which will help but which i warn are highly addictive.

    your gp will be able to offer the best advice and you need to make sure youre getting treatment if you need it.
 
 
 
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