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    I have a place to study pgdip physician associate studies, it is partially funded by the NHS Trust. The NHS trust funds the course £9250 each year and I get a university bursary of £5000 per year. The £5000 per year doesn't even cover the accommodation for one year in a different city so how do they expect you to live?
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    Hey. Funding options to study on Physician Associate courses is currently not nationalised is down to local agreements between HEIs and local NHS Trusts/CCG/Health Education boards.

    Firstly, you should consider yourself very lucky to be given anything at all. There are students up and down the country who get no funding whatsoever and are expected to fund their tuition fees and living/travel costs with no NHS support or bursary.

    Many students rely on personal savings and Professional Career Development Loans (PCDLs) to fund their way through the postgraduate course. I believe Barclays and the Co-op currently offer PCDLs to students, but you apply through the government portal (https://www.gov.uk/career-development-loans). These are at a higher interest than government funded student loans and you are required to start paying the loan back 1-month after your course ends, regardless of your employment status post graduation.

    If the course is an MSc award, students are able to apply for a government funded student loan, for which you are entitled to a £5,000 loan per year which needs to be paid back once you have qualified. You only start paying back government funded student loans once your wage reaches the set threshold, set by the government, the same as undergrad student loans. PGDip courses however do not qualify for a government funded student loan.

    Working on the side during the PA course is a no go if you want to pass the national certification examination. The 2-years is ridiculously intensive, and juggling full time clinical placements alongside your entire evenings, nights and weekends spent studying, working a paid job is almost impossible.

    It's a difficult 2-years financially, there's no doubt about that.
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    try studying an advanced nurse practitioner, working full time no funding no study time.
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      (Original post by JamesManc)
      I have a place to study pgdip physician associate studies, it is partially funded by the NHS Trust. The NHS trust funds the course £9250 each year and I get a university bursary of £5000 per year. The £5000 per year doesn't even cover the accommodation for one year in a different city so how do they expect you to live?
      Many PA students take out a £10,000 career development loan or the £10,000 student loan depending if it's an MSc or PGdip.

      Spread across the two years that gives you £10,000 to live off each year if you add the bursary to it - 10k to live off per year should be plenty
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      Aren’t there any charity funding bodies that can help us. I’m a Scottish student going into pgdip in England and this finance issue is giving me the shakes. I’m guessing the nhs won’t fund Scottish students or even help with childcare 😭😭😭
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        No student finance unless it's an MSc, only option I'm aware of is £10,000 career bank loan from the co-operative bank
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        (Original post by jasaunders_par)
        Hey. Funding options to study on Physician Associate courses is currently not nationalised is down to local agreements between HEIs and local NHS Trusts/CCG/Health Education boards.

        Firstly, you should consider yourself very lucky to be given anything at all. There are students up and down the country who get no funding whatsoever and are expected to fund their tuition fees and living/travel costs with no NHS support or bursary.

        Many students rely on personal savings and Professional Career Development Loans (PCDLs) to fund their way through the postgraduate course. I believe Barclays and the Co-op currently offer PCDLs to students, but you apply through the government portal (https://www.gov.uk/career-development-loans). These are at a higher interest than government funded student loans and you are required to start paying the loan back 1-month after your course ends, regardless of your employment status post graduation.

        If the course is an MSc award, students are able to apply for a government funded student loan, for which you are entitled to a £5,000 loan per year which needs to be paid back once you have qualified. You only start paying back government funded student loans once your wage reaches the set threshold, set by the government, the same as undergrad student loans. PGDip courses however do not qualify for a government funded student loan.

        Working on the side during the PA course is a no go if you want to pass the national certification examination. The 2-years is ridiculously intensive, and juggling full time clinical placements alongside your entire evenings, nights and weekends spent studying, working a paid job is almost impossible.

        It's a difficult 2-years financially, there's no doubt about that.

        That is great that you have provided many potential avenues for funding sources, and it is great to know that if push comes to shove there are options out there.

        However, I do not consider it luck that someone is given something for being on the course. In fact, it is well established which courses will be funded and which will not, so it is more down to the places you apply to whether or no you are funded. If people are unable to be geographically flexible due to other commitments that is a different point altogether.

        With regards to your advice on working being a no go area, I am not sure this is entirely helpful and echo's a lot of what Universities parrot without addressing the realities facing many potential students. For those students that may be from a less privileged background that have no sources of income, savings or help, the mechanism of funding along with having a job is there only real potential to be on this course. If these instruments were taken away, it may de-incentivise people to apply. It is well established that those entering medical school are increasingly coming from a narrow part of the population and do not reflect the patients they serve.

        https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jan/22/medical-school-students-wealthy-backgrounds

        Would you not agree that a wider represented workforce is not better for all involved?

        Also it has been shown that students from poorer backgrounds are put off by debt and if working can alleviate some of this, then why not?


        https://www.timeshighereducation.com...ity-study-says

        Whilst the course is quite intensive, it does not mean that you should not work altogether. It may mean that you can seek employment but forms of employment that will not be taxing or may enhance your knowledge of the course. On my course we have people that sell cakes they bake, work the odd shift in bank, tutor students or work with the university which provide a casual nature which is suitable. As a result it means that we have a diverse group of people that each bring a unique perspective. My advice would be to start the course without a job initially to see how things are going, if you are able to manage and can work for a few hours a week then it may be a good option.

        Whilst working may impact your course, so can the fear of having no money or debt. It's a double edged sword, but I don't think it is my place to say who can and cannot work!
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          To be fair, we had to sign a contract to say we wouldn't work. My friends still work on the side though!
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            (Original post by paulbarlow)
            try studying an advanced nurse practitioner, working full time no funding no study time.
            Does it cost £18,000 though?
            You're working as you're studying so still getting paid, no?
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            I just want to echo what Jeff said. Recieving funding isn't anything special really. There are a multitude of courses in England that have provided funding for the last few intakes. If you are flexible enough to go where these courses are then that's great.

            Also I would agree that working during this course is doable, but realistically only on a casual basis because it would be especially difficult to fit in during placement. It all depends on your circumstances, how much you need and how much free time you want left.

            The time commitment may be difficult, but doable as we have plenty of parents on our course that juggle other responsibilities successfully.

            If you have structure and efficiency with your studies you won't be spending all your evenings and weekends studying.

            All the best I hope it works out for you!
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            (Original post by YorkshireSoapCo)
            To be fair, we had to sign a contract to say we wouldn't work. My friends still work on the side though!
            That sounds a bit fishy to me. I don't see how a university could contractually make you do this unless they are paying you as an employee themselves.

            Where are you studying?
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              (Original post by BChutney)
              That sounds a bit fishy to me. I don't see how a university could contractually make you do this unless they are paying you as an employee themselves.

              Where are you studying?
              We're employed by a trust who 'sponsors' the course (we still pay tuition fees). I'm studying in the North West :-) (Manchester/UCLAN/Liverpool)
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              (Original post by YorkshireSoapCo)
              We're employed by a trust who 'sponsors' the course (we still pay tuition fees). I'm studying in the North West :-) (Manchester/UCLAN/Liverpool)
              Yeah I understand now, your course is a completely different kettle of fish as they pay you a salary.
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                (Original post by BChutney)
                Yeah I understand now, your course is a completely different kettle of fish as they pay you a salary.
                Yeah they pay us £1000 a month and then £750 of that gets paid to the university for tuition fees so we have £3000 to live off each year.

                Salary sounds a better deal but I'd rather have fees paid for and the £5000 bursary :')

                Albeit some courses don't get anything so I count my blessings
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                (Original post by YorkshireSoapCo)
                Yeah they pay us £1000 a month and then £750 of that gets paid to the university for tuition fees so we have £3000 to live off each year.

                Salary sounds a better deal but I'd rather have fees paid for and the £5000 bursary :'

                Albeit some courses don't get anything so I count my blessings
                That does sound rough, but I imagine you have a lot of resources to benefit from in Manchester! Ours is not in a medical school so although we have our lectures tailored to the PA syllabus, practical resources are a bit thin.

                Do you guys do placement blocks or one year theory and one placement?
               
               
               
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