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Should I take Physics if I hate Math? Watch

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    (Original post by Oneiropólos)
    I'm currently choosing my A-Levels for entry into my chosen sixth form next year and so far I'v chosen two.

    Geography and Psyhcology.
    Both are solid subjects I enjoy and am good at so it's a no brainer about these two.

    For the third I'v nailed it down to it being a facilitating subject. Those I am considering are Biology,Physics and History.

    My main career focus is on doing Architecture so obviously you would say I should take Physics or maybe even Math instead of Geography. Hold on , nope.

    I hate Maths but love the science of Physics.
    That's the problem. I'm getting told this when I tell my predicament to people, 'if you enjoy Physics take it, you shouldn't not take it because of one thing'.

    That's like saying I want Mac and Cheese but I hate the macaroni.
    It doesn't work like that.

    However because my mind is in a whirl of thought about this topic I keep going back and forth saying 'Lemme just yolo it' and then my other half responding with 'no you imbecile don't'.

    If I didn't take Physics my next choice would be Biology even though it has no relevance to my preferred career path.

    I haven't done History at GCSE so that's something to consider aswell.

    What's your take on this?
    Any help will be gladly appreciated!
    Generally speaking, you can do Physics without Maths. However, you might not do well if you do not like maths because a lot of maths is involved in Physics.
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    (Original post by Black Water)
    Generally speaking, you can do Physics without Maths. However, you might not do well if you do not like maths because a lot of maths is involved in Physics.
    Good to know, thanks!
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    You can easily ace A Level Physics without A Level Maths. You cannot do real physics without a strong mathematical grounding though.
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    The thing is that physics/maths isn't like "macaroni and cheese but don't like macaroni". It's like "pasta, with anything, but have a wheat intolerance". Like...physics is fundamentally entwined with maths. You WILL have to do maths, to do physics. They aren't separate entities - realistically physics is "just" applied maths.

    However, the question of whether you need to do A-level Maths with physics, is another issue entirely. If you intend to apply to architecture, then you could reasonably take physics without mathematics, and you wouldn't find yourself held back by that in applying (but may struggle more with the physics course due to having less constant exposure and practice of the basic maths used). However, you'd get just as useful preparation in mechanics, but much better preparation in it, by taking A-level Maths. Plus, you will need to do maths consistently throughout A-level Physics, which will be a the "high end" of GCSE level maths. So...if you hate maths why are you considering something...which just makes you do maths...?

    I'd probably suggest doing History, as you'll need to write essays in an architecture course to some extent (for theory/history modules/topics) and if they require Physics, they probably also require Maths - and I'm fairly certain very few require either. Thus, they will expect to be teaching you any relevant aspects of the subjects from scratch anyway (whereas they're more likely to leave "learning to write an essay" as an exercise for yourself - which can be a bit tricky to trial and error your first couple essays). Also a lot of the 20th century architecture was shaped by/developed in response to modern historical events, such as the world wars/cold war and the associated technological and social changes. So you would have some nice (albeit debatably useful) context for the above.
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    (Original post by Oneiropólos)
    I'm currently choosing my A-Levels for entry into my chosen sixth form next year and so far I'v chosen two.

    Geography and Psyhcology.
    Both are solid subjects I enjoy and am good at so it's a no brainer about these two.

    For the third I'v nailed it down to it being a facilitating subject. Those I am considering are Biology,Physics and History.

    My main career focus is on doing Architecture so obviously you would say I should take Physics or maybe even Math instead of Geography. Hold on , nope.

    I hate Maths but love the science of Physics.
    That's the problem. I'm getting told this when I tell my predicament to people, 'if you enjoy Physics take it, you shouldn't not take it because of one thing'.

    That's like saying I want Mac and Cheese but I hate the macaroni.
    It doesn't work like that.

    However because my mind is in a whirl of thought about this topic I keep going back and forth saying 'Lemme just yolo it' and then my other half responding with 'no you imbecile don't'.

    If I didn't take Physics my next choice would be Biology even though it has no relevance to my preferred career path.

    I haven't done History at GCSE so that's something to consider aswell.

    What's your take on this?
    Any help will be gladly appreciated!
    My son wanted to do A level physics without doing maths and was advised against it by the teachers at the 6th form. He went on to do computer science without maths and he found that hard as much of the course seemed to assume that students take maths, as he was advised would be the case with physics.

    At his 6th form it was possible to take art if evidence could be shown of ability through a portfolio. Design is also a preferred subject.

    Good luck!
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    No, Math is the language of physics. You can understand math without understanding physics but you cant understand physics if you cant understand math.
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    (Original post by Beth_H)
    I'm told that the 'typical' combination of A levels for Architecture is Maths, Physics and Art. Honestly, I would question why you want to study Architecture if you really hate Maths that much.
    Modern architecture is not based much on maths at all. It is only really art/design skill that is important, though basic maths/physics does play a part.

    It is engineers who need to have a strong mathematical understanding, as they have to turn the architect's idea into reality.
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    (Original post by Capitata)
    Modern architecture is not based much on maths at all. It is only really art/design skill that is important, though basic maths/physics does play a part.

    It is engineers who need to have a strong mathematical understanding, as they have to turn the architect's idea into reality.
    Of course, individual architects' careers vary massively, but I still fail to understand why the OP wants to study a degree course for which most universities recommend they take subjects they have said they won't enjoy.
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    As someone who didnt take A-level maths but did take A-level physics I am going to go against what most people say.

    imo it doesnt make the physics a-level harder, the maths covered in a physics A-level doesnt even use any of the maths past GCSE. What is it about maths you dislike? As in physics it is mostly being able to rearrange basic equations, know when to use each equations and application of concepts. There are some parts like SHM (I think) where you will need to derive an equation from a few other equations but again in terms of maths its not difficult (just basic algebra)

    So imo as long as you can do basic algebra (for rearranging equations) and can plug numbers into equations, I think you can do the maths part (or when it comes to deriving equations learn to) if you can do the bits I have mentioned. The rest is just physics (which includes knowing when to use certain equations)
    What grade are you currently at if you don’t mind me asking? I’m doing Physics without Maths, not because I dislike Maths but I prefer Physics over it and preferred my other subjects over maths. The downside is we can’t do any Physics related degrees or Engineering but if your like me and you don’t want to go down that path then I guess it’s a good subject to show off a wide variety of skills
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    What grade are you currently at if you don’t mind me asking? I’m doing Physics without Maths, not because I dislike Maths but I prefer Physics over it and preferred my other subjects over maths. The downside is we can’t do any Physics related degrees or Engineering but if your like me and you don’t want to go down that path then I guess it’s a good subject to show off a wide variety of skills
    I have finished my A-levels and im at uni but I got a B in my physics A-level (also got a very low C at GCSE in both maths and physics so people can certainly improve, they just need to learn how to study that subject)

    You're totally right in that you cant do physics at uni (and a lot of engineering courses) without maths (and this is because a physics a-level lacks all of the maths that is contained within a maths a-level that is used in those uni degrees) but if you dont want to go into those subjects thats fine

    It is good to enjoy physics as it will make putting in the time required to do well in it easier as you'll enjoy the time you spend studying it.

    Meh its not really important to show a diversity of A-level subjects for uni courses tbh thats just a myth that a lot of six forms seem to throw about (I have no idea why, maybe to get people to take the less popular subjects to?). It wont help or hinder you by taking a wide range of subjects as long as you have the required subjects at the required grades for the uni course you want to do thats the important thing (along side references etc)
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    (Original post by Capitata)
    Modern architecture is not based much on maths at all. It is only really art/design skill that is important, though basic maths/physics does play a part.

    It is engineers who need to have a strong mathematical understanding, as they have to turn the architect's idea into reality.
    That isnt really true from what I hear either tbh, while there is a fair amount of maths in the first couple of years of the degree, all of my friends that have grad engineering jobs say that they dont use any maths except bits that can be done on a calculator
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    I have finished my A-levels and im at uni but I got a B in my physics A-level (also got a very low C at GCSE in both maths and physics so people can certainly improve, they just need to learn how to study that subject)

    You're totally right in that you cant do physics at uni (and a lot of engineering courses) without maths (and this is because a physics a-level lacks all of the maths that is contained within a maths a-level that is used in those uni degrees) but if you dont want to go into those subjects thats fine

    It is good to enjoy physics as it will make putting in the time required to do well in it easier as you'll enjoy the time you spend studying it.

    Meh its not really important to show a diversity of A-level subjects for uni courses tbh thats just a myth that a lot of six forms seem to throw about (I have no idea why, maybe to get people to take the less popular subjects to?). It wont help or hinder you by taking a wide range of subjects as long as you have the required subjects at the required grades for the uni course you want to do thats the important thing (along side references etc)
    Wow that’s an impressive improvement. I didn’t really know what to do for my 3rd but I enjoy Physics so I thought may as well go for it a good variety from essay based subjects as it definitely gives your hand a rest
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    Wow that’s an impressive improvement. I didn’t really know what to do for my 3rd but I enjoy Physics so I thought may as well go for it a good variety from essay based subjects as it definitely gives your hand a rest
    aha thanks, if you think you will enjoy it go for it! I am yet to encounter a subject that I dont think any average person could learn to tackle (and I am 3rd year of a theoretical physics degree) with the RIGHT practice and perseverance.

    Physics is classed as a stereotypical difficult subject but that is normally because when people find they cant do it they are either not doing the right practice (and dont have the interest to persevere with it) or they lack the pre requisite knowledge to understand that subject (and they dont know they lack the knowledge either a lot of the time).

    Different subjects just require a different level of competency in different skills and if you look at a subject where you have little of a certain skill that requires a high level of that skill then of course it will look super difficult because you havent spent the time building up the skills required to tackle the subject. My point is that the more physics you do the better you will get at it.
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    (Original post by Oneiropólos)
    I'm currently choosing my A-Levels for entry into my chosen sixth form next year and so far I'v chosen two.

    Geography and Psyhcology.
    Both are solid subjects I enjoy and am good at so it's a no brainer about these two.

    For the third I'v nailed it down to it being a facilitating subject. Those I am considering are Biology,Physics and History.

    My main career focus is on doing Architecture so obviously you would say I should take Physics or maybe even Math instead of Geography. Hold on , nope.

    I hate Maths but love the science of Physics.
    That's the problem. I'm getting told this when I tell my predicament to people, 'if you enjoy Physics take it, you shouldn't not take it because of one thing'.

    That's like saying I want Mac and Cheese but I hate the macaroni.
    It doesn't work like that.

    However because my mind is in a whirl of thought about this topic I keep going back and forth saying 'Lemme just yolo it' and then my other half responding with 'no you imbecile don't'.

    If I didn't take Physics my next choice would be Biology even though it has no relevance to my preferred career path.

    I haven't done History at GCSE so that's something to consider aswell.

    What's your take on this?
    Any help will be gladly appreciated!
    Although Physics and Maths complement each other, it doesn't necessarily mean that Physics is all about maths. If you really enjoy it, don't hold back. Just practise and work hard to improve your maths skills in this subject. But also keep in mind that even though you enjoy it, are you actually good at it? If you can do well in your mock exams and even in GCSE, yeah, consider taking Physics. Since you want to be pursue a career on Architecture some other choice can be Photography, DT, Textiles but I think you need to have a GCSE on these subjects.
 
 
 
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