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    Hi, I'm just wondering if anyone else has enrolled to go BA (Hons) Buisness and Managment for February and what you think about it? I've enrolled to to ful time and quite exited!!

    If someone on here has already completed it, a bit of help and more information about it would be grand. (Do the tutours email you with the assignments and do we know emails for tutors, and who we send our work back to for it to be marked?) All abit confusing tbh!!
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    (Original post by codilou97)
    Hi, I'm just wondering if anyone else has enrolled to go BA (Hons) Buisness and Managment for February and what you think about it? I've enrolled to to ful time and quite exited!!

    If someone on here has already completed it, a bit of help and more information about it would be grand. (Do the tutours email you with the assignments and do we know emails for tutors, and who we send our work back to for it to be marked?) All abit confusing tbh!!
    The degree course is made up of three stages, mapping to the three years of a traditional university. Each stage is made up of a number of modules, with a total of 120 credits per stage, each credit representing an average of 10 hours of study.

    Each module will have several resources available to you:
    -A module website, which contains ways of accessing all of your other resources
    -A study guide which breaks your study down into weekly chunks
    -Study materials (most are available both online and as physical books, though there are some which will only be online, and some which will only be physical books, and some modules are doing away with physical books)
    -Forums for directed discussion among the module presentation, region, region cluster, or tutor group, computer programs and applets
    -Assignments for reading online or downloading
    -Computer assignments, which may be formative (for gauging your own abilities) or for assessment (marked and counted toward your module result)
    -Module news
    -Your tutor's contact details

    How you contact your tutor will depend on what works for both of you. I've had a tutor who only wanted to be emailed (but would take calls and respond to forums), one who desired forum discussions so others could see and take part if appropriate, and one now who prefers to be called.

    Assignments are typically read online in a portion of the module site devoted to them. They are rarely all available from the beginning of the module presentation, and will typically "go live" and become viewable a few weeks before they're due. Assignments typically come in two types: Tutor Marked Assignments (TMA) and (interactive) Computer Marked Assignments (CMA/iCMA). Typically, TMAs are submitted in electronic format through an uploading page in the module website. Some (but not all) modules also allow TMAs to be submitted by post. They are normally returned with constructive feedback within two weeks. If submitted electronically, the marked TMA can be downloaded from the module website.

    Don't panic. Everybody starts at the beginning, and you'll get plenty of information on what you need to do when. Congratulations on your decision, and good luck on your degree course.
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    (Original post by JollyCynic)
    The degree course is made up of three stages, mapping to the three years of a traditional university. Each stage is made up of a number of modules, with a total of 120 credits per stage, each credit representing an average of 10 hours of study.

    Each module will have several resources available to you:
    -A module website, which contains ways of accessing all of your other resources
    -A study guide which breaks your study down into weekly chunks
    -Study materials (most are available both online and as physical books, though there are some which will only be online, and some which will only be physical books, and some modules are doing away with physical books)
    -Forums for directed discussion among the module presentation, region, region cluster, or tutor group, computer programs and applets
    -Assignments for reading online or downloading
    -Computer assignments, which may be formative (for gauging your own abilities) or for assessment (marked and counted toward your module result)
    -Module news
    -Your tutor's contact details

    How you contact your tutor will depend on what works for both of you. I've had a tutor who only wanted to be emailed (but would take calls and respond to forums), one who desired forum discussions so others could see and take part if appropriate, and one now who prefers to be called.

    Assignments are typically read online in a portion of the module site devoted to them. They are rarely all available from the beginning of the module presentation, and will typically "go live" and become viewable a few weeks before they're due. Assignments typically come in two types: Tutor Marked Assignments (TMA) and (interactive) Computer Marked Assignments (CMA/iCMA). Typically, TMAs are submitted in electronic format through an uploading page in the module website. Some (but not all) modules also allow TMAs to be submitted by post. They are normally returned with constructive feedback within two weeks. If submitted electronically, the marked TMA can be downloaded from the module website.

    Don't panic. Everybody starts at the beginning, and you'll get plenty of information on what you need to do when. Congratulations on your decision, and good luck on your degree course.
    Wow thank you for this information, it has really helped!! I am just wondering if you know about this:

    When sending over assignments to your tutour do they check it over for you before submitted it to be marked? E.g. if I sent over my assignment and it didn't meet it's criteria will they send it back over to me to change things or add more information before it gets marked.. Thanks again for your help.
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    (Original post by codilou97)
    Wow thank you for this information, it has really helped!! I am just wondering if you know about this:

    When sending over assignments to your tutour do they check it over for you before submitted it to be marked? E.g. if I sent over my assignment and it didn't meet it's criteria will they send it back over to me to change things or add more information before it gets marked.. Thanks again for your help.
    No, they are the ones who mark it, and it's sadly their responsibility to mark work which is not acceptable as such.

    As you can imagine, however, they despise the need to do that, so will give you every chance to make sure it doesn't happen. The best way to get the advice is to attend tutorials where your tutor (or another tutor, you're free to attend the tutorials of other tutors) will give general module guidance and answering questions and concerns, and they'll often devote a substantial amount of time discussing the preparation of assignments.

    A note on tutorials: Some will be face-to-face (F2F) at a regular meeting place (commonly on the campus of a traditional university or college), and some will be online. Family considerations keep me from attending F2F tutorials, so I attend online ones. One of the (many) drawbacks to this is that the online tutorials only occasionally get taught by my own tutor, so I need to make sure I contact him or her via email or the forums to be sure I understand their thoughts.
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    (Original post by JollyCynic)
    No, they are the ones who mark it, and it's sadly their responsibility to mark work which is not acceptable as such.

    As you can imagine, however, they despise the need to do that, so will give you every chance to make sure it doesn't happen. The best way to get the advice is to attend tutorials where your tutor (or another tutor, you're free to attend the tutorials of other tutors) will give general module guidance and answering questions and concerns, and they'll often devote a substantial amount of time discussing the preparation of assignments.

    A note on tutorials: Some will be face-to-face (F2F) at a regular meeting place (commonly on the campus of a traditional university or college), and some will be online. Family considerations keep me from attending F2F tutorials, so I attend online ones. One of the (many) drawbacks to this is that the online tutorials only occasionally get taught by my own tutor, so I need to make sure I contact him or her via email or the forums to be sure I understand their thoughts.
    Oh right okay!! No probblem at all, just a query. When you say about face-to-face and meetings etc, how and where? I thought it was all based online without going to meetings and that, or is it up to yourself to do so? I know some modules you have to go to exams, but where? That's the bit that confuses me also.. Do they find out where the closes examination place is closer to your area?
    Thanks again
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    (Original post by codilou97)
    Oh right okay!! No probblem at all, just a query. When you say about face-to-face and meetings etc, how and where? I thought it was all based online without going to meetings and that, or is it up to yourself to do so? I know some modules you have to go to exams, but where? That's the bit that confuses me also.. Do they find out where the closes examination place is closer to your area?
    Thanks again
    The number and purpose of the tutorials will vary widely depending on your module. There's normally one that's an introduction to the module, one to deal with the information in each block, one to deal with preparing each TMA (this may be combined with the block information tutorial), and one to help prepare for revising in advance of an exam. It depends on how much information there is in the module and how difficult it is to get through it.

    Each tutorial will typically be given multiple times in your cluster group (generally once per tutor, but not strictly), and you can decide which of those to go to in person, or go to the online one, or multiple ones, or none of them. Often there's only one online version of each tutorial, but again, this varies. (Online tutorials are a lot like a conference call with microphones, chat, and a presentation screen.)

    Due to the nature of the majority of students at the OU, tutorials typically happen after hours or (less commonly) the weekend. Your tutor group will normally be local to your geographical area, and F2F tutorials are held within that area. In earlier modules, when there are many more students on the module, tutor groups are more local. Later on when there may be only a few hundred students in the whole country on a module, local tutorials may not be possible. F2F tutorials typically take place in a space in another university or other school, but also conference centres, public libraries, council halls, or anywhere else they can hire space.

    It's roughly similar for where exams are held. The OU will partner with an exam centre to proctor the exam in an area (fairly) local to you. The date and time is typically during working hours on a weekday, and won't be specified until after the module starts. They will get the date to you as early as you can for planning holidays or other events.

    I appreciate trying to get a handle on it all. It's a huge commitment you're making, so it's nice to know what you're in for.
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    Fabulous thank you again you've really helped me!!! I applied for my student loan to pay for my first module which is an introduction to business and management and when I applied for I said that that module will last 1 year. But I don't think it is 1 year is it??? I'm worried that will mess up my student loan... do you think it's a problem?!
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    (Original post by codilou97)
    Fabulous thank you again you've really helped me!!! I applied for my student loan to pay for my first module which is an introduction to business and management and when I applied for I said that that module will last 1 year. But I don't think it is 1 year is it??? I'm worried that will mess up my student loan... do you think it's a problem?!
    Erm. Yes, it will probably mess up your loan next year, I'm afraid.

    The Open University uses "Seasonal Academic Years" (SAY). That means instead of the academic year always beginning in the autumn, it begins on different dates for different students depending on their first ever module with the OU. Your first module starts in February, so your SAY will always start in February.

    This normally doesn't matter to OU students, because most study part time. But you indicated that you're studying full time.

    What that means is that you're getting 120 credits worth of funding for February-September. In October, you will not be able to get a new loan, because you can only get a loan for 120 credits through your SAY. You won't be able to get funding again until February 2019. And there's likely to be modules you want/need to take which aren't available in February, so your "second year" of Uni wouldn't start until October of 2019, rather than October of 2018.

    I'd call up the OU when you can and discuss it with someone there who understands how Seasonal Academic Years affect funding, and seek their advice.
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    Oh sugar!!! I can easily cancel my loan application and start again which I will do now. I'll ring up the OU and ask when the end date is for the module. Thank you for your help. Very clueless as you can tell but I'll get used to it lol!!
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    (Original post by codilou97)
    Oh sugar!!! I can easily cancel my loan application and start again which I will do now. I'll ring up the OU and ask when the end date is for the module. Thank you for your help. Very clueless as you can tell but I'll get used to it lol!!
    February modules end in September.

    If I were you I would seriously consider waiting until next October to start. You will either need to take a break in your studies because the finance won't cover a February 2018-July 2019 study period, or you'll have to take a break because level 2 and 3 modules may only start in October.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    February modules end in September.

    If I were you I would seriously consider waiting until next October to start. You will either need to take a break in your studies because the finance won't cover a February 2018-July 2019 study period, or you'll have to take a break because level 2 and 3 modules may only start in October.
    I've rang the Ou and they said I can leave the loan as it is. Do my first module in February which ends in September then in October I can do my other module. And so on. I've already researched about the courses and I've wrote down all of my modules for the next 3 years and it all works out ok. I am also in the middle of doing my level 3 apprenticeship in management so I won't be bored and waiting for new modules from the OU to hurry up lol!!
 
 
 
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