Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How much practical molecular biology occurs at medical school? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    xxx
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Med2018)
    Hello everyone, I'm applying to study medicine after my current degree but am having a bit of a dilemma. My dissertation is a lab based research project. I didn't get my first choice of project and didn't fully know what my second choice project involves. Turns out most of it consists of practical molecular biology experiments (PCR, gel electrophoresis etc) which I've managed to avoid up until now, so am very inexperienced.

    I'll admit, I'm finding it hard and feel out of my depth in that lab group and like I shouldn't be there. I don't enjoy it because I'm not the biggest fan of lab work and have very little interest in molecular biology but I'm of course going to try my best with it because a) I can't change it and b) I want to get the best final degree classification to apply to med school.

    This all has led to me having a slight confidence crisis. How likely am I to do this kind of molecular biology at medical school? Short-term stuff is fine, even interesting, but I can't imagine having to do this stuff constantly

    Thanks guys
    We were taught basic definitions of what they are and what they are used for and that was it. It will be a small drop in the ocean at med school.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Literally none at my medical school - it's not a lab science degree.
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    19
    It will depend on the Medical School. We had a few practicals doing that stuff in our first year but nothing much after that. If the Medical School you go to does do that stuff, it will be a very small amount.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Absolute **** all. You need to know the basic theory of how DNA replication, transcription and translation work. Then a very small amount on what each of the main techniques are (e.g. what is PCR and how can it be used for testing for viruses etc). In terms of actual practical knowledge/skills in how to perform all the stuff, you'll never have to do it.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Basically none at all at most medical schools and very little at some medical schools.
    Southampton have a 4 month research project at the start of your third year and some students choose to do a laboratory project and some choose to write a literature review or do an audit.
    I think the more traditional courses will contain more lab work but again very little overall.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    At Oxford, possibly the most traditional med school, you do 1 day performing PCRs and another 4 or 5 biochemistry practical half-days that involved some electrophoresis. You also had various other practicals but they occupied at most two afternoons per week. That was it. And even that is infinitely more than many med schools.

    If you were a grad you'd probably skip this though, so, literally none.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.