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4th a level for medicine, economics or physics?URGENT! Watch

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    (Original post by Relentas)
    As I said all courses could be different in certain ways, you may actually be doing physics without realising it. For example: CAT scanners involve physics as they talk about waves and radiation. Pressure is also to do with physics as well a sphygmomanometer (blood pressure meter) is used to measure the blood pressure of a patient, yes you may not need to use pressure formulaes in med school to find out their blood pressure but that is still physics. Knowing physics helps to understand it but it isnt necessary as you can figure out how things work without it, it just helps according to some schools.
    I have never heard a CT scanner talk about anything! Even on my "Ionising Radiation" Courses. Fancy that being Physics! Who knew??? And THAT is what a sphyg is for?? I wish this had been explained to us poor doctors before *sigh* Seems Physics is all around us
    I am glad we are all agreed it isn't necessary.........
    As we say, if you enjoy Physics, by all means study it, but you don't need it for medicine
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    Most unis don't really look at your 4th A-Level because they don't like to give people with a 4th subject an unfair disadvantage. Honestly it really doesn't matter as long as you have bio and chem, but workload-wise economics is probably the best bet.
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    1) calm the **** down. Even if you hate your option you will have the chance to change it within the first few weeks of sixth form so it doesn't matter if you choose a wrong option/a subject you don't like.

    2) economics is pretty much business studies with a bit more maths/graphs. If you like that kind of stuff go for economics. Physics well you know that **** from doing gcse. It's a bigger step up at alevel and is considered one of the most hardest alevels. If you think you can cope with it then go for it.

    3) which ever you pick, it won't affect your chances of getting into medicine cuz they only want the 2 main subjects Chem and bio. The other 2 alevels are up to the students choice and won't affect their chances of getting into medicine.

    If you have been researching and checking the entry requirements on the Internet you would already know that. And also your alevel options isn't what's gonna stop you from getting into, it's the grades you get in them and also you as a person. If you have done work experience, volunteering and extra curricular activities. The activity your passionate about. It doesn't have to be a bunch of them. If you can talk for at least 10 minutes passionately about 1 of your extra curriculars, that is more than enough than just giving a couple of sentences about several extra curriculars you don't even enjoy.

    These are the things you need to be worrying about. Also make sure you smash your bmat/ukcat cuz that would help a lot. The ukcat is really hard and requires a lot of practice. It's not a knowledge based test, it actually requires skills such as Timing, ability to solve patterns, quick reading and decision making.
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    Yea, as I said, its not needed. It just helps to have it as you understand things a lot better. (I'm in Scotland so don't know whats in the GCSE course) Tbh you probably have done some A level physics without realising it as some of its just pure logic.
    As I said to the other guy, CAT scanners are an example of higher/alevel physics as you go into more detail and maybe understand it better/quicker as you know more about how it works before even learning about it. Without physics you maybe wouldn't know that x-rays are fired through you and seen by x-ray detectors or even that an x-ray is a wave.
    Why are you lecturing us on what medical school is like and what being a doctor is like when we've gone through it and you haven't?

    The only time they properly teach you the physics behind a CT scan (not CAT, they don't only work in the axial plane anymore) is if you're a radiology registrar. And even then, it's not physics like you're taught in school.

    Stop creating pointless arguments please.
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    Yea, as I said, its not needed. It just helps to have it as you understand things a lot better. (I'm in Scotland so don't know whats in the GCSE course) Tbh you probably have done some A level physics without realising it as some of its just pure logic.
    As I said to the other guy, CAT scanners are an example of higher/alevel physics as you go into more detail and maybe understand it better/quicker as you know more about how it works before even learning about it. Without physics you maybe wouldn't know that x-rays are fired through you and seen by x-ray detectors or even that an x-ray is a wave.

    edit: adding something, most schools wouldn't care what subjects you take, some just want the grades as well as biology and chemistry.
    Now my O levels may have been eleventy-billion years ago, but I vaguely seem to remember something about X-rays and waves and.....nope, it's gone!
    I can order and read a CT scan though
    I am sure all Physics students will be pleased to hear that some of it is pure logic, saves them going to all the classes! Must be easy if I have just been doing it all this time without knowing.
    I think you'll find they ALL just want the grades, though not all want biology and chemistry
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    You want to get into medicine and you've already chosen the most suitable combination. If you can handle Physics then take it, however, understand that it is a complex subject. Personally, I believe Physics would be a better alternative as it would compliment the trio. Remember that you can always drop Physics. Keep Maths, Chem, and Biology as your priority, they are all equally hard.
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    (Original post by GANFYD)
    I have never heard a CT scanner talk about anything! Even on my "Ionising Radiation" Courses. Fancy that being Physics! Who knew??? And THAT is what a sphyg is for?? I wish this had been explained to us poor doctors before *sigh* Seems Physics is all around us
    I am glad we are all agreed it isn't necessary.........
    As we say, if you enjoy Physics, by all means study it, but you don't need it for medicine
    I said you don't need it in the first place, I ain't doing medicine yet, I'm just assuming things on what I've read on the application areas on university websites.
    As for your sarcastic comment about the sphyg, I was just using that as an example to show that even if you don't pay that much attention to things and that physics is still there.
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    As I said all courses could be different in certain ways, you may actually be doing physics without realising it. For example: CAT scanners involve physics as they talk about waves and radiation. Pressure is also to do with physics as well a sphygmomanometer (blood pressure meter) is used to measure the blood pressure of a patient, yes you may not need to use pressure formulaes in med school to find out their blood pressure but that is still physics. Knowing physics helps to understand it but it isnt necessary as you can figure out how things work without it, it just helps according to some schools.
    Cool, but how will A-Level Physics specifically help with that?

    We didn't cover CT scans in my A-Level physics, for example, and we need to just be able to interpret them rather than worry about how they work. Similarly with measuring blood pressure - we've been taught how to do it but the physics behind it is something that we don't need to worry about at all.

    I do agree that there is a lot of Physics in Medicine, but don't agree that A-Level Physics will help at Medical School because that stuff is mostly irrelevant for us.
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    Imperial won't mind if you have 3 or 4 a levels so it literally doesn't make a difference.

    UCL prefers a non science subject so Economics would probably be good for it.

    Cambridge doesn't require 4 a levels, but looking at freedom of information requests, a fair few applicants/offer holders had Physics A-level. (Google whatdotheyknow plus whatever uni you want to find out about and check what subjects the offer holders have yourself).
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    I said you don't need it in the first place, I ain't doing medicine yet, I'm just assuming things on what I've read on the application areas on university websites.
    As for your sarcastic comment about the sphyg, I was just using that as an example to show that even if you don't pay that much attention to things and that physics is still there.
    And I was just thanking you for your very patronising comments that are based on a website you read and a total lack of knowledge of med school or life as a doctor. And were very unhelpful for the OP, as may lead him to believe that physics is necessary for medicine, or even, as per your original statement, there is a lot of it in medicine (as opposed to there just being a lot of it in life *breathes in and out* #physicsinaction)
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    (Original post by Appleorpear)
    I'd say do physics.

    If you're doing medicine, it goes Chemistry>Biology>Physics/Maths. In an extremely competitive application process you need measurable advantages. Remember that a large proportion of maths will be essentially like physics as well, and chemistry helps a lot with physics and vice versa. It's not a completely new A level like economics. So much content will be in maths and chemistry.
    Not really there are areas of crossover like a 6th of maths is similar to like an 8th of physics (basic mechanics) and a couple things that that in both chemistry and physics but mostly they are different subjects. I'd say rather than the slight overlap, the advantage to maths, phys and chem is that they all reinforce each other and require similar skills.
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    Oml calm down yh
    Just do the easier one and the one your more passionate about
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    Cool, but how will A-Level Physics specifically help with that?

    We didn't cover CT scans in my A-Level physics, for example, and we need to just be able to interpret them rather than worry about how they work. Similarly with measuring blood pressure - we've been taught how to do it but the physics behind it is something that we don't need to worry about at all.

    I do agree that there is a lot of Physics in Medicine, but don't agree that A-Level Physics will help at Medical School because that stuff is mostly irrelevant for us.
    Well, if that's the case then he should do what he wants, (I was just recommending physics due to some unis saying it's useful). Maybe the Higher course in Scotland is different to A-Level, in that we talk about a reasonable amount of medicine. We went over how CT scanners work, and how ionizing radiation helps with other things too. (though it was only briefly)
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    (Original post by GANFYD)
    (and UCL actively state they favour a non-science 3rd A level
    Where do you get this from? There's no mention of that in their 2018 entry requirements, and TSR's medicine requirements is about 4 years old
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    (Original post by GANFYD)
    And I was just thanking you for your very patronising comments that are based on a website you read and a total lack of knowledge of med school or life as a doctor. And were very unhelpful for the OP, as may lead him to believe that physics is necessary for medicine, or even, as per your original statement, there is a lot of it in medicine (as opposed to there just being a lot of it in life *breathes in and out* #physicsinaction)
    *inhales* *puts hands down* "Boi"
    How was me mentioning how I thought physics was useful patronising?
    I didn't try to make him doubt himself in what he chose by recommending physics. I was just telling him something I assumed or thought would be useful, its a thread where you offer your input and I offered mines. He doesn't need to take it. I wasn't trying to make him "believe that physics is necessary for medicine" as on a ton of websites and university application pages it says "physics is useful though not needed", which he probably knows/has seen since he wants to do medicine.
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    (Original post by amaraub)
    Where do you get this from? There's no mention of that in their 2018 entry requirements, and TSR's medicine requirements is about 4 years old
    Not checked UCLs admission criteria since change to linear A levels, so may well be different, was still there last year, but if you have read and it's not this year, then they have changed it
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    *inhales* *puts hands down* "Boi"
    How was me mentioning how I thought physics was useful patronising?
    I didn't try to make him doubt himself in what he chose by recommending physics. I was just telling him something I assumed or thought would be useful, its a thread where you offer your input and I offered mines. He doesn't need to take it. I wasn't trying to make him "believe that physics is necessary for medicine" as on a ton of websites and university application pages it says "physics is useful though not needed", which he probably knows/has seen since he wants to do medicine.
    I have not seen this on a "ton of university application pages" and as I am frequently asked for advice regarding admissions, would be interested to know which ones are suggesting this. Thank you
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    (Original post by GANFYD)
    I have not seen this on a "ton of university application pages" and as I am frequently asked for advice regarding admissions, would be interested to know which ones are suggesting this. Thank you
    Alrighty, I'll post them here:
    *I'll get a bunch rather than them all as its time consuming and boring*
    https://gyazo.com/67bd1a6fdf16d7d3c8468f219cb5c794 (from dundee)
    https://www.dundee.ac.uk/study/ug/medicine/ (so you can check(
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    (Original post by Relentas)
    Alrighty, I'll post them here:
    *I'll get a bunch rather than them all as its time consuming and boring*
    https://gyazo.com/67bd1a6fdf16d7d3c8468f219cb5c794 (from dundee)
    https://www.dundee.ac.uk/study/ug/medicine/ (so you can check(
    Right, that's one, what are the rest of them?

    And to put what you have posted in context, it follows on form this:

    • "If Biology has not been passed at Higher or A-Level this subject must normally have been passed as indicated under entry requirements.
      A good pass in Combined or Dual Science at GCSE may be accepted instead of a single GCSE pass in Biology.
      A Physics qualification is not an entry requirement. However, knowledge of Physics is helpful to students on the course."

    Which I would interpret them as implying a knowledge at GCSE level would be adequate, as it is in a section where they comment that GCSE Biology would be adequate. Certainly doesn't state an A level would be useful.
    Anyway, this is irrelevant to the original question, so if you just let us know what other med schools have said they feel Physics beyond GCSE would be beneficial, THAT may help OP to decide
 
 
 
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